Butterfly side breathing???

Butterfly side breathing???

Post by JRLu » Tue, 30 Dec 1997 04:00:00


Hello,

As a butterflier, I have been breathing comfortably to my side for nearly 5
years now.  When I breath front, it feels awkward.  I am a sprinter and hope to
improve my times in Indianapolis this May.  My question is:  Can I improve my
times by breathing front?  Coaches, fliers...your suggestions are welcome.

Thanks,
J. Luker

 
 
 

Butterfly side breathing???

Post by Brian L. Deideric » Tue, 30 Dec 1997 04:00:00

Quote:

> Hello,

> As a butterflier, I have been breathing comfortably to my side for nearly 5
> years now.  When I breath front, it feels awkward.  I am a sprinter and hope to
> improve my times in Indianapolis this May.  My question is:  Can I improve my
> times by breathing front?  Coaches, fliers...your suggestions are welcome.

> Thanks,
> J. Luker


If it ain't broke, don't fix it.  I would, instead, look to decrease the
number of breaths that you take.

 
 
 

Butterfly side breathing???

Post by Julian » Fri, 02 Jan 1998 04:00:00

As a butterflyer and side breather, I recommend you do what is natural to you.
If you change it might distrupt your stroke.  It is not to say that breathing
in front is bad, I breath on my side 90% of the time but do look forward
sometimes to get distance marks.  I would learn to do both but stick with your
strong ability.

 
 
 

Butterfly side breathing???

Post by Adam DiBartol » Fri, 02 Jan 1998 04:00:00

Quote:

> Hello,

> As a butterflier, I have been breathing comfortably to my side for nearly 5
> years now.  When I breath front, it feels awkward.  I am a sprinter and hope to
> improve my times in Indianapolis this May.  My question is:  Can I improve my
> times by breathing front?  Coaches, fliers...your suggestions are welcome.

> Thanks,
> J. Luker


I've messed around with side breathing a little but never could get comfortable
with it.  It seemed like it pulled my stroke off balance.  But if you are
comfortable doing it I would not recommend changing, it is supposedly better than
forward breathing.  Pros:  Easier to turn head to the side than lift forward; less
surface resistance to water.  Cons:  Hard to see competitors on opposite side
(unless you can alt).

--
_____________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________
Adam R. DiBartolo

_____________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________

 
 
 

Butterfly side breathing???

Post by Robert Baker-Sel » Mon, 05 Jan 1998 04:00:00



Quote:
>I've messed around with side breathing a little but never could get comfortable
>with it.  It seemed like it pulled my stroke off balance.  But if you are
>comfortable doing it I would not recommend changing, it is supposedly better
>than
>forward breathing.  Pros:  Easier to turn head to the side than lift forward;
>less
>surface resistance to water.  Cons:  Hard to see competitors on opposite side
>(unless you can alt).

Another Con : You run a serious risk of dropping your opposite shoulder
- I wouldn't recommend racing without a lot of time spent with a coach
if you're planning to switch to side breathing.

A Pro - less pressure on the neck as you breath - It is possible to
injure yourself being a bit keen on the front breathing (trust me -its
embarrasing to say you injured your neck breathing)

Journeyman swimmer and COBOL programmer extraordinaire

 
 
 

Butterfly side breathing???

Post by Keith Sto » Tue, 06 Jan 1998 04:00:00


Quote:

>Another Con : You run a serious risk of dropping your opposite shoulder
>- I wouldn't recommend racing without a lot of time spent with a coach
>if you're planning to switch to side breathing.

>A Pro - less pressure on the neck as you breath - It is possible to
>injure yourself being a bit keen on the front breathing (trust me -its
>embarrasing to say you injured your neck breathing)

Long long ago in a galaxy far far away when I used to swim butterfly
competetively and coach, I found that front breathing problems were
usually associated with a poor finishing kick. A clean, strong kick during
the stroke puts your head in the right position to breath straight on
without having to lift the head much.

If you have your stroke working right, I feel it would be more effort to
breath to the side, so I feel the cons outweigh the pros by quite a bit.

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