Days getting shorter <=> Winter is coming

Days getting shorter <=> Winter is coming

Post by ScoobyDo » Sun, 28 Jun 2009 06:13:57


Have a safe and happy summer

<SD>

 
 
 

Days getting shorter <=> Winter is coming

Post by Repairma » Sun, 28 Jun 2009 21:10:56

I'm walking past the Ski Doo to get to the Sea Doo now.
With all the rain this summer we better have some left over to make some
friggin snow.........


Quote:
> Have a safe and happy summer

> <SD>


 
 
 

Days getting shorter <=> Winter is coming

Post by JWentwort » Tue, 30 Jun 2009 07:48:44

"Days getting shorter <=> Winter is coming"
 Now here's an optimist!

 
 
 

Days getting shorter <=> Winter is coming

Post by ScoobyDo » Mon, 13 Jul 2009 23:04:33

Always - when it concerns snow :o)

<SD>


Quote:
> "Days getting shorter <=> Winter is coming"
> Now here's an optimist!

 
 
 

Days getting shorter <=> Winter is coming

Post by JWentwort » Wed, 15 Jul 2009 21:13:38

It's almost time for the annual guessing game "What will Winter be like?".
Accuweather will release their 2009-2010 winter forecast tomorrow.

Northern New England is having a cold, wet, spring and summer to this point,
with averages temperatures down by about 5 +. Recently, nighttime lows have
been in the high-40's, low-50's, with daytime highs only about 70 .
Accuweather says that "In some cases, at various locations throughout the
region, data suggests that cold winters follow cool summers." So, there you
have it; an iron-clad guarantee of a cold winter in New England! In some
cases, at various locations.

 
 
 

Days getting shorter <=> Winter is coming

Post by JWentwort » Thu, 16 Jul 2009 03:50:24


Quote:
>    I think that cool, cloudy summers and cold falls are bad for snow
> production in the midwest and northeast.
>    If the water temperature in the Great Lakes is high enough, then
> there's a lot of moisture available when the cold, dry winds come across
> the Great Plains and down from Canada.
>    If the water temperature in the Great Lakes is low, you get less
> evaporation... and god forbid that Lake Superior (or any of them for that
> matter) freezes over; because then there is virtually no moisture
> available and all you get are frigid, dry winds all winter.

I think that might be true for upstate New York and parts of Vermont, but we
in New Hampshire tend to get our moisture for big winter storms from the
Atlantic Ocean. A typical big winter storm starts as a low moving east until
it hits the coast and then heading north. We do get snow from Canada, we
call them clippers, but usually they don't deliver a big payload.
 
 
 

Days getting shorter <=> Winter is coming

Post by JWentwort » Fri, 17 Jul 2009 03:09:24


Quote:
> It's almost time for the annual guessing game "What will Winter be like?".
> Accuweather will release their 2009-2010 winter forecast tomorrow.

Joe Bastardi of AccuWeather is calling for cold and snow for the North-East
this winter. He feels the current El Ni o will fade over the winter and will
probably not play as much of a role in the overall weather pattern. The
storm track that could develop this year will bring storms up the Eastern
Seaboard. This type of storm track will differ from that of the past two
years, when storms tended to take a track farther west from Texas into the
Great Lakes. That track into the Great Lakes brought unseasonably mild
weather to the major East Coast cities, keeping them on the more rainy side
of the storms. The track this year right along the Eastern Seaboard would
put the major cities on the cold, wintry side of the storms. The areas that
will be hit hardest this winter by cold, snowy weather will be from New
England through the Appalachians and mid-Atlantic, including North Carolina.

On the other hand, he's calling for less-than-normal snows in the Pacific
Northwest and northern Plains.

I know, a winter forecast in July has about as much weight as a helium
balloon.