Avalanche takes eight.....

Avalanche takes eight.....

Post by D War » Wed, 31 Dec 2008 08:50:48


FERNIE, B.C. - Police say six bodies have been recovered from the scene of
two avalanches that struck 11 snowmobilers in southeastern B.C.

The six bodies are being removed from the scene near Fernie by helicopter.

Two men are still unaccounted for.

Three other men had survived and walked to safety after the back-to-back
avalanches on Sunday.

Police had said earlier that they still had hope for the men, all in their
mid-20s and from Sparwood, but time was not on their side.

Search efforts were delayed by the need to bomb snow in the area to reduce
the chance of more avalanches impeding rescuers.

 
 
 

Avalanche takes eight.....

Post by D War » Wed, 31 Dec 2008 08:56:02

This is what happens when nobody has the proper gear (avalanche beacons),
nobody has had any training, and nobody heeded the extreme avalanche
warnings posted all weekend....

I feel for the people of Sparwood ( a neighboring  town ).  This is a
sledding community and very tight - most people work at the mine (Elk Valley
Coal).  They work hard and play harder.  To lose this many in one fell swoop
must be just awful.

 
 
 

Avalanche takes eight.....

Post by Doug Bisset » Thu, 01 Jan 2009 03:07:10

Quote:

> This is what happens when nobody has the proper gear (avalanche beacons),
> nobody has had any training, and nobody heeded the extreme avalanche
> warnings posted all weekend....

> I feel for the people of Sparwood ( a neighboring  town ).  This is a
> sledding community and very tight - most people work at the mine (Elk Valley
> Coal).  They work hard and play harder.  To lose this many in one fell swoop
> must be just awful.

The reports are saying, that all of them were well prepared, and
experienced.

Just shows that it can happen to anybody, at any time, when you go to
play in the big hills, and nature has the last swing at the bat. I am
just glad that my mountain snowmobiling happened 30 years ago, when we
couldn't get to the dangerous spots (I quit going, about 6 years ago,
because the old body just couldn't take it any more). Now, almost
anybody can get to the bottom (or the top), of those big slide areas,
and it seems to be fun to do that (fun, but not smart).

My condolences to the families, and friends, but they went out having
fun, doing something that they enjoyed. Hopefully, I will do the same
(but I will avoid the avalanche areas).

I don't, usually, use tag lines, in the news groups, but this one
seems to be appropriate:

Life's Journey is not to arrive at the grave safely in a well
preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, totally worn out,
shouting,  ' Holy sh!t... What a Ride!! '

--

reply)
Polaris 2000 500RMK

 
 
 

Avalanche takes eight.....

Post by D War » Thu, 01 Jan 2009 10:58:28

Yes, Doug, I was reacting to the earliest reports, before the true stories
came out.  They were all experienced mountain riders, and almost every one
of them was equipped with a beacon.  Friday's avalanche report put the risk
at "moderate" but could change quickly if the right conditions were to
happen.  The right conditions happened, and it went from moderate to extreme
in a couple of hours.  That is how fast things can change in the mountains
here.

Like you, I quit doing the extreme riding a few years ago.  I'm fifty one
this year and it hurts everywhere after getting banged around on a sled even
trail riding now....


Quote:

>> This is what happens when nobody has the proper gear (avalanche beacons),
>> nobody has had any training, and nobody heeded the extreme avalanche
>> warnings posted all weekend....

>> I feel for the people of Sparwood ( a neighboring  town ).  This is a
>> sledding community and very tight - most people work at the mine (Elk
>> Valley
>> Coal).  They work hard and play harder.  To lose this many in one fell
>> swoop
>> must be just awful.

> The reports are saying, that all of them were well prepared, and
> experienced.

> Just shows that it can happen to anybody, at any time, when you go to
> play in the big hills, and nature has the last swing at the bat. I am
> just glad that my mountain snowmobiling happened 30 years ago, when we
> couldn't get to the dangerous spots (I quit going, about 6 years ago,
> because the old body just couldn't take it any more). Now, almost
> anybody can get to the bottom (or the top), of those big slide areas,
> and it seems to be fun to do that (fun, but not smart).

> My condolences to the families, and friends, but they went out having
> fun, doing something that they enjoyed. Hopefully, I will do the same
> (but I will avoid the avalanche areas).

> I don't, usually, use tag lines, in the news groups, but this one
> seems to be appropriate:

> Life's Journey is not to arrive at the grave safely in a well
> preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, totally worn out,
> shouting,  ' Holy sh!t... What a Ride!! '

> --

> reply)
> Polaris 2000 500RMK