2 cycle oil

2 cycle oil

Post by emery starkweath » Mon, 18 Nov 1996 04:00:00


I have 5 quarts of castrol 2-cycle oil thats formulated for dirt bikes, my
question being can I use this oil in my sled ?? or is it too cold out ? or if
I do will I destroy my motor ?


 
 
 

2 cycle oil

Post by Derek Este » Mon, 18 Nov 1996 04:00:00

Quote:

> I have 5 quarts of castrol 2-cycle oil thats formulated for dirt bikes, my
> question being can I use this oil in my sled ?? or is it too cold out ? or if
> I do will I destroy my motor ?

I have 2 stroke outboard oil. It seems to work fine. A lot of people
seem to be mistaken when they say they have 2 cycle. I am not sure of
what 2 cycle exacly is, but it is not in snowmobiles. 2 Stroke I think
is regular engines cars. One cycle is the exhaust-up and gas-down;
compression-up and power-down. What you are refering to is 2 stroke.
--
http://www.sover.net/~restey/ Descent stuff, snowmobile stuff
Cow pics and facts

 
 
 

2 cycle oil

Post by Rob Van Drune » Mon, 18 Nov 1996 04:00:00

Quote:
> > I have 5 quarts of castrol 2-cycle oil thats formulated for dirt bikes, my
> > question being can I use this oil in my sled ?? or is it too cold out ? or if
> > I do will I destroy my motor ?

> I have 2 stroke outboard oil. It seems to work fine. A lot of people
> seem to be mistaken when they say they have 2 cycle. I am not sure of
> what 2 cycle exacly is, but it is not in snowmobiles. 2 Stroke I think
> is regular engines cars. One cycle is the exhaust-up and gas-down;
> compression-up and power-down. What you are refering to is 2 stroke.

Two cycle IS THE SAME as saying two stroke. Automobiles are four stroke
or four cycle (you say potAto, I say potato). Use a good TCW-3 rated oil
in your snowmobile, it will thak you in the long run. If you want to use
outboard motor oil or two stroke(cycle) motorcycle oil make sure the oil
has a low cold pour point, say -45 or so. This will allow the oil to
flow even at extreme temperatures. Most snowmobile oil is rated for a
good cold pour point. FWIW

Rob Van Drunen
1996 Ultra SP
1993 XLT SP

 
 
 

2 cycle oil

Post by Scott C. Sulliv » Mon, 18 Nov 1996 04:00:00

In a galaxy far, far away, Derek Estey typed:

Quote:
> I have 2 stroke outboard oil. It seems to work fine. A lot of people
> seem to be mistaken when they say they have 2 cycle. I am not sure of
> what 2 cycle exacly is, but it is not in snowmobiles. 2 Stroke I think
> is regular engines cars. One cycle is the exhaust-up and gas-down;
> compression-up and power-down. What you are refering to is 2 stroke.

Two-stoke and two-cycle both refer are both shorthand for the
same thing -- the two-stoke per cycle engine.  Time for Shop 101.
A stroke is when the piston travels in the cylinder from top to
bottom (or bottom to top).  One revolution of the flywheel (which
is connected to the crankshaft, which moves the piston) moves the
piston through 2 strokes -- on ANY internal combustion engine.
So, on a two-stroke, one revolution of the crankshaft brings the
piston through its entire power cycle.  On a car, 2 revolutions
of the crankshaft are needed to bring the piston through its
entire cycle (hence 4 strokes per cycle).  A cycle is the following:
1.      intake -- the gas & air mix is sucked into the engine
2.      compression -- the piston moves from bottom to top,
                compressing the fuel/air mix
3.      power -- the spark ignites the fuel/air mix, driving
                the piston down the cylinder
4.      exhaust -- the burned up gases are removed

Now, on a car engine (4 stroke/cycle), this is exactly how
the steps are followed in the engine.
On a 2 stroke/cycle, though, steps 1 and 4 occur at the same
time.  Those holes at the bottom of the cylinder are called
ports, and when the piston uncovers them, gas/air is blown
into the cylinder from one side, blowing the exhaust out the
ports on the other side.  How does the gas/air mix get blown
into the cylinder?  When the piston moves down the cylinder,
it compresses the fuel/air in the crank-case, which got
there from the carburetor.  So, by nature of the design,
the crankcase can't hold any oil like a 4 stroke/cycle
engine can (or it would all get blown into the cylinder!!!).
So, the oil is mixed with the gas to lubricate all the parts
inside the engine.  And, as we all know (some more than others :)
engines don't tend to run very long without oil.  So, in
conclusion -- why did I write this?  Oh, yeah.  If the oil
for your dirt-bike meets the standards for the engine on your
snowmobile (TCW-III or something), then mix it to the proper
ratio (or maybe even a little extra oil) and use it up.
If it doesn't meet the requirements, or you're unsure about
using it, then go out and buy a couple-a-quarts of a good,
brand name, snowmobile specific oil (especially if you have
oil-injection).  After all, if you wreck your sled, it
probably wasn't worth trying to save the $6 to $12 by using
up the old oil you have.  Just my $.02 (and then some)!!!  
Please follow this up with any corrections, calculations, or
other generally useful information.  Send all flames to

--

  Michigan Tech -- Home of the Yooper, the Pasty, and SNOW!!!
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       ,_/_|                       "Protected by the most
     d}     \{              __    powerful theft deterrents
   /`   372  \_____________/_|_    known to man:  old age,
  ============\__|__'69___(__|  obsolescence, and oxidation."
   `\__________\___Polaris___|
O    ._/_. "    \__Mustang__/   ,-~
 \__/_____\___  (0_0_0_0_0_0),-~

 
 
 

2 cycle oil

Post by Doug Mill » Sat, 23 Nov 1996 04:00:00


Quote:
>other generally useful information.  Send all flames to

Great post!
One thing I learned on the list. Not all oils have the same cold
weather pouring temperature, not a big deal for bikes, but a bummer if
the oil jells on your snowmobile.
Seems like I read that if the bottle says it is OK for snowmobiles, it
is probably fine. If it doesn't, maybe you shouldn't use it.
-Doug Miller
 
 
 

2 cycle oil

Post by Shane Zeppeli » Sun, 01 Dec 1996 04:00:00

Actually, 2 cycle and 2 stroke are the same thing.  2 cycle (or 2 stroke)
refers to how many times the piston travels in the cylinder when intaking
fuel or exhausting burnt fumes.  In a 2 cycle, the piston travels down to
both exhaust the fumes and push new fuel into the compression chamber, and
up to compress the fuel and vacuum more fuel into the crank case.  In a 4
cycle, the piston travels up once to compress the fuel, then down again and
up again to exhaust the fumes and down again to get ready to compress new
fuel.  This is done through mechanical valves.  In a 2 cycle, the piston is
used as the valve when transfering fuel from the crank case to the
compression chamber and as an exhaust valve.

4 cycle motors use a manifold to mix the raw fuel with air, while 2 cycle
motors use the crank case as the manifold to mix fuel.

Shane Zeppelin :-)
Litchfield, Mn



Quote:

> > I have 5 quarts of castrol 2-cycle oil thats formulated for dirt bikes,
my
> > question being can I use this oil in my sled ?? or is it too cold out ?
or if
> > I do will I destroy my motor ?

> I have 2 stroke outboard oil. It seems to work fine. A lot of people
> seem to be mistaken when they say they have 2 cycle. I am not sure of
> what 2 cycle exacly is, but it is not in snowmobiles. 2 Stroke I think
> is regular engines cars. One cycle is the exhaust-up and gas-down;
> compression-up and power-down. What you are refering to is 2 stroke.
> --
> http://www.sover.net/~restey/ Descent stuff, snowmobile stuff
> Cow pics and facts