Cross topic from RSSIF -- Easier to turn artist into athlete, or vice versa?

Cross topic from RSSIF -- Easier to turn artist into athlete, or vice versa?

Post by Jane » Fri, 10 Dec 2004 08:42:28


Came across an intriguing question on other group:  Is it easier to
turn an artistic skater into an athletic one?  Or turn the athletic
skater into an artistic one?

I'll preface my opinions by first saying I am *most definitely* neither
and artistic nor athletic skater!  I'm hoping for some of each before I
hit 80!

Comparing the *** skaters I know, I have seen each type.  I think if
one is blessed with speed, power, and can use it on decent edges, it is
the best starting point.  I know one *** skater who is very
expressive, has great "in between" skating and flow, but has not made
strides in jump height, speed, etc., which will increase her
competitive edge.  I know another *** skater who is all power and
speed, and has learned, even if it is convincing imitation, artistry in
her moves. This is very interesting to observe, and impressive to see
when you knew what this skater was like before.

I know my coach has had a bear of a time trying to get speed and power
out of me.  It seems I have "smoothness" and the occasional "graceful
arms".  The power is coming, but slowly.  The speed is getting better.
I wish I'd had each, and that coach was trying instead to get artistry
out of me.

 
 
 

Cross topic from RSSIF -- Easier to turn artist into athlete, or vice versa?

Post by DBNY » Fri, 10 Dec 2004 12:29:49

IMO, it's easier for an athletic skater to learn artistry than the other way
around.  This was an issue for my daughter, who was very athletic, and pushed
her jumps and spins way past her basic skating.  She was eventually forced to
work on the artistic side and improved significantly.  I observed many other
kids who were artistic but lacked athleticism.  The axel is generally their
stopping point.
DB

 
 
 

Cross topic from RSSIF -- Easier to turn artist into athlete, or vice versa?

Post by john » Sun, 12 Dec 2004 18:28:52

It is all about body style. I never believed there was
much difference in mentality except that a thin long-boned
graceful skater is never going to be much of a jumper, and
a stocky short boned somewhat tight skater is never
going to be very graceful. Each one has to make the
best of what they have. The real problem is the sport
itself being biased to one or the other, and having no
depth or scope which allows each to optimize their
gifts. There is the real artistic question. Are the judges,
coaches, and founders of the sport intelligent enough
to appreciate the qualities of each style? The obvious
answer is, "NO!"  A high level dancer will never beat
a high level jumper in this sport. But they certainly
should be able to if this sport is going to be anything
other than merely a skating sport with no sense of art
at all. And that is possible in a point system if the
advantages of each are offset by requireds from each
style. We did that in gymnastics in the compulsories ..
esp on beam. A dancer style could express great amplitude in held positions,
while a more dynamic style
could offset that with strong high leaps ... but would
generally take deductions for lack of flexibility of her
legs above the horizontal in her leaps. The dancers
leaps would be lower, but have greater amplitude in
the height of her legs above horizontal. Each could bring
their own special gifts to our sport.

johns

 
 
 

Cross topic from RSSIF -- Easier to turn artist into athlete, or vice versa?

Post by Jane » Mon, 13 Dec 2004 07:54:07

I had the good fortune to watch a competition where exactly what
usually does *not* happen, happened.  Meaning, the "dancer" beat the
"jumper", or jumper*s*, in this case.  About two years ago, during a
USFSA showcase competition, a large group (I think 7 or 8) of ***aged
female skaters was won by a skater who had not one jump in her program.
To me, it was obvious she would be the winner, and I was very happy to
see the judges acknowledge the quality, speed, power, and beautiful
choreography of her program.  I believe she did the Senior Move (I
don't know what it's called, and am too lazy to go get my rulebook
right now) which travels diagonally across the ice.  It was stunning.
With speed, power and grace.  Like in my dreams how I wish I could
skate.  So.......it does happen, but more frequently it does not.
 
 
 

Cross topic from RSSIF -- Easier to turn artist into athlete, or vice versa?

Post by john » Fri, 17 Dec 2004 12:34:08

My little Class III dancer use to draw the Class I elites
out of hiding to come watch her. Her floor routines were
filled with dive cartwheels into fast back walkovers ..
basically not much in the tumbling world ... but the Class
I coaches would tell them .." Go look like THAT !"

johns