Dear Lifetime Network: Thank you, thank you, thank you!!!!!

Dear Lifetime Network: Thank you, thank you, thank you!!!!!

Post by Trudi Marrapo » Tue, 19 Nov 2002 02:34:45


I am amazed.

When I first saw and heard Nancy Kerrigan opening this season's skating
coverage on Lifetime, talking about what we were going to see on the Skate
Canada pairs and dance finals, I fully feared that this channel had
returned to its old wicked ways...you know, the days when they covered
skating more as a soap opera than as a sport. The days in which they
showed us more of what was going on backstage, and teams giving dirty
looks to their rivals, and lengthy phluphy profiles of teams depicting
their histories in hyperdramatic terms, than of what was taking place on
the competitive ice. The days when they had to rerun the top short
programs/ODs over again before finally showing us long programs and free
dances. In short, "Lifetime: Cheesy Skating Television for Women."

But...not so! Not so at all! They did everything right!

1. They relegated Nancy to doing intros, summaries, interviews and other
little phluphy snippets...and yet, they kept those to an incredible
minimum, considering. For example, the Quebec City "travelogue" took about
10 seconds, and the profile of Langlois & Archetto about 20 or 30. No
syrupy sappiness to it, no going on forever, no crap. What's more, Nancy
looked good and even spoke fairly well, for Nancy. Wonder if they gave her
voice lessons for this? All in all, she came off looking very good and
appealing, for the most part, if a little out of her element when talking
to dance teams. The intro clip with her primping in the reflection of a
skate blade was even cute. They may just have succeeded in saving a
reputation damaged by the snarky pre-Lillehammer podium/Mickey Mouse
comments of 1994. Today's Nancy looks happy and content and in charge. And
I was impressed by the little soliloquy she delivered at the opening of
the whole thing...that was well written, whoever wrote it.

2. They stuck with the***, Peggy and Terry team for the actual
play-by-play. And they didn't tape it on filmy-looking tape, it actually
looked like videotape. They skipped showing us any of the SPs or ODs again
and went right to the final action. Hurray!

3. The longest phluph piece on the entire broadcast was...INTERESTING. The
interview with Vera Wang and how she designed Nancy's revolutionary
costumes. Yeah, it was chick stuff, but what chick stuff! This chick is
very happy they seem to have picked up on this trend. Next week, it's the
story of Peggy Fleming's chartreuse-green Olympic dress. Cool. And best of
all, there was TIME for this phluph...I didn't get the feeling that they
were chacking important competition coverage to bring me trivia. They
really showed me just about everybody I would have liked to see, with the
possible exception of Kalesevich & Parchem.

4.***'s jaunty pink bow tie cracks me up.

5. With the exception of Peggy's bizarrely unrealistic comment "There
should not be injuries in sports" (nice save, Terry, who added the comment
"At least not with this frequency in skating" or some such thing), and
***'s rather lame conclusion to his sermon about dance judging (that we
only care about the marks from the sporting side, and that we should just
watch dance for its beauty or some such thing??), the commentary was quite
good. There were at least two quotable Buttonisms, one of which I just had
to make my new sig because it's so great. As long as this team can keep me
laughing, I will forgive them any other shortcomings.

6. The entertainment value provided by the dancers' costumes--and by their
fans. Little did I know that Marie-France Dubreuil's "Weasels Ripped My
Dress" costume has got nothing on Maxim Staviyski's golden chest scorpion
(at first I wondered "What are they skating to, 'Rock Lobster'?"). It was
even better than Kati Winkler's "And They Say You Can't Wear a
Bridesmaid's Dress Again After the Wedding!" OD costume at Nations Cup.
And considering all the snake-charmer saxophone in Denkova & Staviyski's
music, it seemed only appropriate that someone tossed them a stuffed snake
for Maxim to wrap around himself in the kiss 'n' cry.

What does it all mean? That I am looking forward to Sunday mornings on
Lifetime all season long. Keep up the good work, people!
--
Trudi

"Every skater goes through a thousand CDs until they find a piece that they like--and then, all too often, they end up with 'Carmen.'"
--Dick Button

 
 
 

Dear Lifetime Network: Thank you, thank you, thank you!!!!!

Post by Laura La Gass » Tue, 19 Nov 2002 07:33:54

Quote:

> What does it all mean? That I am looking forward to Sunday mornings on
> Lifetime all season long. Keep up the good work, people!

Thanks for the review, Trudi!  I usually fast-forward through everything
except for the actual skating, but thanks to your review, I plan to
watch the *entire* show (well, sans commercials).

Laura

 
 
 

Dear Lifetime Network: Thank you, thank you, thank you!!!!!

Post by Krok » Tue, 19 Nov 2002 10:20:44

I envy you both!  For some reason best known to itself Dish network aired the
show at 7 a.m. instead of at 10 as shown in local listings here in Sacramento.
Thus the Easter Egg hunt of figure skating coverage continues.

 
 
 

Dear Lifetime Network: Thank you, thank you, thank you!!!!!

Post by Junc » Tue, 19 Nov 2002 12:43:03

      Another, "Well done, LIF". Thanks ever so much. Also thanks to the
sponsors who bought airtime and enabled us to see this coverage.

Arthur

 
 
 

Dear Lifetime Network: Thank you, thank you, thank you!!!!!

Post by Hele » Wed, 20 Nov 2002 02:38:30

I must add an enthusiastic "well done!" -- what a delight this program was.
They fit in a lot of skating and I loved the segment on Vera Wang and
Nancy's costumes.  Amazing that they had to send her ***/sequins Olympic
costume to Austria (?) for application of the sequins.  Nancy seems so
comfortable in this role and at ease with herself now, it's great to see.

My father used to love "Breakfast at Wimbledon"; now it's like I have the
same enjoyment, with my favorite sport.  Thank you Lifetime!

Helen


Quote:

>       Another, "Well done, LIF". Thanks ever so much. Also thanks to the
> sponsors who bought airtime and enabled us to see this coverage.

> Arthur

 
 
 

Dear Lifetime Network: Thank you, thank you, thank you!!!!!

Post by Laura La Gass » Wed, 20 Nov 2002 04:02:54

Quote:

> Amazing that they had to send her ***/sequins Olympic
> costume to Austria (?) for application of the sequins.

They were heat-set lead crystal rhinestones, not sequins.  At the
time Swarovski was developing their "hot fix" rhinestones, and so
Wang sent the dress to them for stoning.  Nowadays (8 years later)
you can buy the hot fix stones and the heat setter very easily.  I
spent about $40 on the tool, and the Swarovski lead crystal hot fix
rhinestones run about $12-$18 per gross (144 pieces), depending on color
and who you buy from.  I'd guess there were about 30 gross on that
dress.  I can heat-set about 2.5 gross per hour (and I'm not terribly
fast), so it probably took about 10-12 hours just to put the stones on.

Laura

 
 
 

Dear Lifetime Network: Thank you, thank you, thank you!!!!!

Post by timpaned » Wed, 20 Nov 2002 04:55:56

Quote:

> I am amazed.

I so agree - it was great coverage and the "human interest" stuff was
kept to a minimum and so was actually a) intersting and b)not too
annoying.  I loved the info on the dress - its part of FS so its kinda
fun to hear about it (although yes, it is, total chick stuff LOL)
 
 
 

Dear Lifetime Network: Thank you, thank you, thank you!!!!!

Post by Mind » Wed, 20 Nov 2002 04:53:24

I, too thought that Nancy looked comfortable, and she looked great!
I noticed she wears her hair streight, and I like that way better.

About Nancy & Vera Wang, the piece was interesting, but I have never been
a big fan of her costume.
Vera Wang said that she liked the white costume the best, but when I saw
Nancy skated with that costume, I thought Nancy looked faded in bright white
ice rink.
I remember once Yuka Sato said that it is nice for a costume to have a bit
of color on regular competition setting. That way, the costume can stands
out on white background.

Quote:

>I must add an enthusiastic "well done!" -- what a delight this program was.
>They fit in a lot of skating and I loved the segment on Vera Wang and
>Nancy's costumes.  Amazing that they had to send her ***/sequins Olympic
>costume to Austria (?) for application of the sequins.  Nancy seems so
>comfortable in this role and at ease with herself now, it's great to see.

 
 
 

Dear Lifetime Network: Thank you, thank you, thank you!!!!!

Post by cmh.. » Wed, 20 Nov 2002 06:38:39



Quote:

>> Amazing that they had to send her ***/sequins Olympic
>> costume to Austria (?) for application of the sequins.
>They were heat-set lead crystal rhinestones, not sequins.  At the time
>Swarovski was developing their "hot fix" rhinestones, and so Wang sent
>the dress to them for stoning.  Nowadays (8 years later) you can buy the
>hot fix stones and the heat setter very easily.  I spent about $40 on the
>tool, and the Swarovski lead crystal hot fix rhinestones run about
>$12-$18 per gross (144 pieces), depending on color and who you buy from.
>I'd guess there were about 30 gross on that dress.  I can heat-set about
>2.5 gross per hour (and I'm not terribly fast), so it probably took about
>10-12 hours just to put the stones on.

Very interesting information. There's an odd geology connection to all
this and, that is the term "rhinestone" in the strictest sense actually
refers to a crystalline mineral called sanidine (it's a quenched, high
temperature version of potassium feldspar), which is common in volcanic
deposits in the Eifel volcanic field in Germany. Some crystals are quite
large, measuring several inches long in some cases. These are in the Rhine
graben, hence the name rhinestone. They are shiny and cheap, so I think
the term became more generic over the years, so a lead crystal version
(which is actually a bit glass, not a crystalline material) could very
reasonably be called a rhinestone.

I ran into this bit of trivia because I helped to work out the method of
finding the ages of individual "rhinestones" (which turns out to be
extremely useful). Now, back to skating ...

--
Chris M. Hall, Assistant Research Scientist
Dept. of Geological Sciences, University of Michigan

Quando omni flunkus moritati

 
 
 

Dear Lifetime Network: Thank you, thank you, thank you!!!!!

Post by WIsi » Wed, 20 Nov 2002 07:17:21

Very cool reply.  Thanks for the info.  Now, maybe you can answer a physics
question that is skating related.

Since Nancy's dress was covered in crystals, I am guessing that is weighed
about 4-5 pounds.  Would this alter her ability to jump or spin as opposed to a
dress that weighed a few ounces?

 
 
 

Dear Lifetime Network: Thank you, thank you, thank you!!!!!

Post by cmh.. » Wed, 20 Nov 2002 07:28:37



Quote:
>Very cool reply.  Thanks for the info.  Now, maybe you can answer a
>physics question that is skating related.
>Since Nancy's dress was covered in crystals, I am guessing that is
>weighed about 4-5 pounds.  Would this alter her ability to jump or spin
>as opposed to a dress that weighed a few ounces?

Well, any weight will impede jump height, so other than psycological
factors, the best jump height would happen when you're *** ;-). That
seems awfully heavy, but a dress covered in lead crystal (which can have a
very high lead content), could get pretty heavy. Let's assume a skater
weight of ca. 110 pounds, and that the crystals add an additional 1-2
pounds (seems like a lot). Then the acceleration at jump time would be
reduced by 1-2%. This seems to be small enough to be in the "noise", so it
would probably not be a big factor. As for spin speed, this would go as
the moment of inertia, but as most of the additional weight would be near
the centre of mass, this would also be a small effect. Any stones on the
arms would increase moment of inertia before the spin/jump, but would be
reduced when that mass was brought in. My gut feel would be that it's not
going to make much difference, especially if one gets used to this sort of
weight with a similarly weighted practice dress.

--
Chris M. Hall, Assistant Research Scientist
Dept. of Geological Sciences, University of Michigan

Quando omni flunkus moritati

 
 
 

Dear Lifetime Network: Thank you, thank you, thank you!!!!!

Post by Laura La Gass » Wed, 20 Nov 2002 07:56:17

Quote:

> Since Nancy's dress was covered in crystals, I am guessing that is weighed
> about 4-5 pounds.  Would this alter her ability to jump or spin as opposed to a
> dress that weighed a few ounces?

A 10-gross pack of 20ss (5mm, the most commonly used stone size for
dance and skating costuming) hot fix Swarovski lead crystal rhinestones
weighs just about four ounces.  I estimate, based on the pictures I've
seen, that there are about 30 gross of stones on it -- that's over
4300 individual stones.  That's only about 12 ounces in weight.  The
entire rest of the dress was probably less than about 12-14 ounces (this
based on me weighing an undecorated costume that I have laying around),
so the whole thing comes to well under a pound, even with all those
stones on it.  I'm sure a dress weighing less than a pound posed no
problem!

Laura

 
 
 

Dear Lifetime Network: Thank you, thank you, thank you!!!!!

Post by Trudi Marrapo » Thu, 21 Nov 2002 11:01:50

Quote:



> >Very cool reply.  Thanks for the info.  Now, maybe you can answer a
> >physics question that is skating related.

> >Since Nancy's dress was covered in crystals, I am guessing that is
> >weighed about 4-5 pounds.  Would this alter her ability to jump or spin
> >as opposed to a dress that weighed a few ounces?

> Well, any weight will impede jump height, so other than psycological
> factors, the best jump height would happen when you're *** ;-). That
> seems awfully heavy, but a dress covered in lead crystal (which can have a
> very high lead content), could get pretty heavy.

Not to mention possibly exposing the wearer to a chemical known by the
State of California to cause cancer, birth defects or other reproductive
harm. (Hey, that's what my box of Christmas lights with the white coated
wires says, I'm just repeating it.) Especially if sweating caused lead to
leach out of the crystals onto the wearer's skin. But I suppose Nancy got
away all right, given that Matthew appears to be just fine.

Quote:
> Let's assume a skater
> weight of ca. 110 pounds, and that the crystals add an additional 1-2
> pounds (seems like a lot). Then the acceleration at jump time would be
> reduced by 1-2%. This seems to be small enough to be in the "noise", so it
> would probably not be a big factor. As for spin speed, this would go as
> the moment of inertia, but as most of the additional weight would be near
> the centre of mass, this would also be a small effect. Any stones on the
> arms would increase moment of inertia before the spin/jump, but would be
> reduced when that mass was brought in. My gut feel would be that it's not
> going to make much difference, especially if one gets used to this sort of
> weight with a similarly weighted practice dress.

OK, but this doesn't answer the real question: if a Chinese male pair
skater throws her, how far would such a skater go, and what would be the
drag coefficient?
--
Trudi

"Every skater goes through a thousand CDs until they find a piece that they like--and then, all too often, they end up with 'Carmen.'"
--Dick Button

 
 
 

Dear Lifetime Network: Thank you, thank you, thank you!!!!!

Post by Ruth Lafle » Thu, 21 Nov 2002 15:06:41


Quote:
> I envy you both!  For some reason best known to itself Dish network aired
the
> show at 7 a.m. instead of at 10 as shown in local listings here in
Sacramento.
> Thus the Easter Egg hunt of figure skating coverage continues.

<begin public service message> For cable channels that have both and east
and west coast feed (including Lifetime, but not ESPN, which shows live
programming and thus only has one feed), Dish always shows the east coast
feed, so lots of stuff is on three hours earlier for Dish network watchers
than people watching on cable. Always check the onscreen program guide
rather than using the local listings, which are for cable, not satellite.
<end public service message>

--Ruth

 
 
 

Dear Lifetime Network: Thank you, thank you, thank you!!!!!

Post by cmh.. » Thu, 21 Nov 2002 23:03:33



Quote:
>OK, but this doesn't answer the real question: if a Chinese male pair
>skater throws her, how far would such a skater go, and what would be the
>drag coefficient?

Ha. Don't know about that, but I think I have spotted a trick they are
doing in their twist lifts which can help lead to quad twist lifts (which,
I believe Z&Z are working on). Hint: think diving and gymnastics. As for
lead, I'll bet you can get Pb crystal in Ca, and it can run 20-30% Pb!
Don't use them for any liquids with a low Ph!

--
Chris M. Hall, Assistant Research Scientist
Dept. of Geological Sciences, University of Michigan

Quando omni flunkus moritati