Russian splits (the jump, not the couples)

Russian splits (the jump, not the couples)

Post by Julia C » Wed, 03 May 1995 04:00:00


I'm looking for advice on how to (safely) do a Russian split jump.  I
can do a regular split, but it's pretty wimpy because I'm not all that
flexible that way.  I'm much better in a side split position, but the
idea of stopping my rotation halfway through the jump, then starting it
again is weird.  I can't get a feel for it in my mind, so I'm afraid to
do it with my body.  My coach is not particularly helpful here.  I've
been assuming that the takeoff and landing are just like a regular
split, but with the body rotated sideways and the hips open during the
actual split.  Any suggestions on training techniques?  Are there some
obvious components of this jump that I'm missing?
 
 
 

Russian splits (the jump, not the couples)

Post by Kevin Anders » Thu, 04 May 1995 04:00:00

Quote:

>I'm looking for advice on how to (safely) do a Russian split jump.  I
>can do a regular split, but it's pretty wimpy because I'm not all that
>flexible that way.  I'm much better in a side split position, but the
>idea of stopping my rotation halfway through the jump, then starting it
>again is weird.  I can't get a feel for it in my mind, so I'm afraid to
>do it with my body.  My coach is not particularly helpful here.  I've
>been assuming that the takeoff and landing are just like a regular
>split, but with the body rotated sideways and the hips open during the
>actual split.  Any suggestions on training techniques?

Try practicing it on the ground.  It feels a lot safer and you get a pretty
good idea for the feel of the thing.  From a standstill jump into the Russian
split position and try and touch your toes.  Once you get the hang of it
on the ground you might have more confindence to try it on the ice.

Kevin

 
 
 

Russian splits (the jump, not the couples)

Post by George Robbi » Thu, 04 May 1995 04:00:00

Quote:


> >I'm looking for advice on how to (safely) do a Russian split jump.  I
> >can do a regular split, but it's pretty wimpy because I'm not all that
> >flexible that way.  I'm much better in a side split position, but the
> >idea of stopping my rotation halfway through the jump, then starting it
> >again is weird.  I can't get a feel for it in my mind, so I'm afraid to
> >do it with my body.  My coach is not particularly helpful here.  I've
> >been assuming that the takeoff and landing are just like a regular
> >split, but with the body rotated sideways and the hips open during the
> >actual split.  Any suggestions on training techniques?

> Try practicing it on the ground.  It feels a lot safer and you get a pretty
> good idea for the feel of the thing.  From a standstill jump into the Russian
> split position and try and touch your toes.  Once you get the hang of it
> on the ground you might have more confindence to try it on the ice.

One other notion is that you're not "stopping" the rotation by assuming
the split position, just slowing it as you move mass aways from your
spin axis.  Likewise, when you move the mass towards the axis, the
rotation will automatically speed up.  Same deal as a spin...

--
George Robbins - not working for,     work:   to be avoided at all costs...
but still emotionally attached to:    uucp:   ...!uunet!tharsis.com!grr


 
 
 

Russian splits (the jump, not the couples)

Post by Christine Luka » Thu, 04 May 1995 04:00:00

Quote:


>>I'm looking for advice on how to (safely) do a Russian split jump.  I
>>can do a regular split, but it's pretty wimpy because I'm not all that
>>flexible that way.  I'm much better in a side split position, but the
>>idea of stopping my rotation halfway through the jump, then starting it
>>again is weird.  I can't get a feel for it in my mind, so I'm afraid to
>>do it with my body.  My coach is not particularly helpful here.  I've
>>been assuming that the takeoff and landing are just like a regular
>>split, but with the body rotated sideways and the hips open during the
>>actual split.  Any suggestions on training techniques?

>Try practicing it on the ground.  It feels a lot safer and you get a pretty
>good idea for the feel of the thing.  From a standstill jump into the Russian
>split position and try and touch your toes.  Once you get the hang of it
>on the ground you might have more confindence to try it on the ice.

>Kevin

Another fun way to practice Russian splits is off a diving board, if
you have access to a pool, of course.  Russian splits are not easy!
You need to make sure you get your legs up, as opposed to pulling your
body down towards your feet.  So you need a fair amount of air time!
Before worrying about touching your hands to your toes, work on the
timing of squaring out your hips in front of you in the air and of
turning both feet straight up, which is very different from the
one-foot-in-front-one-foot-in-back (American split) timing.

Christine