Please explain this Buttonism

Please explain this Buttonism

Post by Blen » Wed, 29 Apr 1998 04:00:00


The thread on Buttonisms reminded me of one that's puzzled me for a
long time: During the initial pose for Moniotte and Lavanchy's free
dance (in 1995, maybe? - the one with the silver cut-out dress), the
camera did a close-up on Sophie Moniotte's face.  Dick said, "Doesn't
she look like a refugee from the Junior League!"  

?????? What did he mean?

--------------------------------------------------------------
~ blenda ~

 
 
 

Please explain this Buttonism

Post by TCAX » Wed, 29 Apr 1998 04:00:00

Quote:

>The thread on Buttonisms reminded me of one that's puzzled me for a
>long time: During the initial pose for Moniotte and Lavanchy's free
>dance (in 1995, maybe? - the one with the silver cut-out dress), the
>camera did a close-up on Sophie Moniotte's face.  Dick said, "Doesn't
>she look like a refugee from the Junior League!"  

>?????? What did he mean?

I'm not sure,but isn't there a junior league of young society women who
organize  charitable and social events?  I guess he was implying she had an
aristocratic," socialite" look to her.
TCAXEL

 
 
 

Please explain this Buttonism

Post by TCAX » Wed, 29 Apr 1998 04:00:00

Quote:
><HTML><PRE>Subject: Please explain this Buttonism

>Date: Tue, Apr 28, 1998 18:57 EDT

>The thread on Buttonisms reminded me of one that's puzzled me for a
>long time: During the initial pose for Moniotte and Lavanchy's free
>dance (in 1995, maybe? - the one with the silver cut-out dress), the
>camera did a close-up on Sophie Moniotte's face.  Dick said, "Doesn't
>she look like a refugee from the Junior League!"  

>?????? What did he mean


 
 
 

Please explain this Buttonism

Post by Mary E Tyle » Wed, 29 Apr 1998 04:00:00

Quote:

> >The thread on Buttonisms reminded me of one that's puzzled me for a
> >long time: During the initial pose for Moniotte and Lavanchy's free
> >dance (in 1995, maybe? - the one with the silver cut-out dress), the
> >camera did a close-up on Sophie Moniotte's face.  Dick said, "Doesn't
> >she look like a refugee from the Junior League!"

> >?????? What did he mean?

> I'm not sure,but isn't there a junior league of young society women who
> organize  charitable and social events?  I guess he was implying she had an
> aristocratic," socialite" look to her.
> TCAXEL

the junior league is a long standing souther tradition... the members
were the high society, the debutantes the daughters of the wealthy (or
genteely poor too) it has sort of a scarlett o'hara ring to it.

dejah, who knows that the junior league does some very worthwhile
charitable stuff...
--
to reply, delete nospam

i trust i make myself obscure, i have need of obscurity now- robert bolt

a heated exchange of unread mail would be welcomed by all- christensen

On The Edge:A Skating Melodrama is Copyright 1998, Mary E Tyler. All
Rights Reserved

 
 
 

Please explain this Buttonism

Post by Vesperti » Thu, 30 Apr 1998 04:00:00

Quote:
Blenda writes:

<<The thread on Buttonisms reminded me of one that's puzzled me for long time:
During the initial pose for Moniotte and Lavanchy's free dance (in 1995, maybe?
- the one with the silver cut-out dress), the camera did a close-up on Sophie
Moniotte's face.  Dick said, "Doesn't she look like a refugee from the Junior
League!" >>

     Well, as a long time member of the Junior League, I assume it was a
compliment! LOL!  Actually, the JL is a charitiable organization made up of
young women (after 45 you have to retire).  The "traditional junior league
type"of the past wass a woman who didn't work, and had plenty of free time to
devote to charity. In the past, this has generally meant someone of a
particular socio-economic status, which is assoiated with a sort of WASPy look.
I assumeButton thought  this skater looked like she  fit such a description.  

 
 
 

Please explain this Buttonism

Post by Louis Epste » Fri, 01 May 1998 04:00:00


: >
: > >
: > >The thread on Buttonisms reminded me of one that's puzzled me for a
: > >long time: During the initial pose for Moniotte and Lavanchy's free
: > >dance (in 1995, maybe? - the one with the silver cut-out dress), the
: > >camera did a close-up on Sophie Moniotte's face.  Dick said, "Doesn't
: > >she look like a refugee from the Junior League!"
: > >
: > >?????? What did he mean?
: >
: > I'm not sure,but isn't there a junior league of young society women who
: > organize  charitable and social events?  I guess he was implying she had an
: > aristocratic," socialite" look to her.
: > TCAXEL
:
: the junior league is a long standing souther tradition... the members
: were the high society, the debutantes the daughters of the wealthy (or
: genteely poor too) it has sort of a scarlett o'hara ring to it.
:
: dejah, who knows that the junior league does some very worthwhile
: charitable stuff...

It's not just Southern....national headquarters are in New York.

 
 
 

Please explain this Buttonism

Post by PosterBo » Fri, 01 May 1998 04:00:00

Quote:



>: >
>: > >
>: > >The thread on Buttonisms reminded me of one that's puzzled me for a
>: > >long time: During the initial pose for Moniotte and Lavanchy's free
>: > >dance (in 1995, maybe? - the one with the silver cut-out dress), the
>: > >camera did a close-up on Sophie Moniotte's face.  Dick said, "Doesn't
>: > >she look like a refugee from the Junior League!"
>: > >
>: > >?????? What did he mean?
>: >
>: > I'm not sure,but isn't there a junior league of young society women who
>: > organize  charitable and social events?  I guess he was implying she
had an
>: > aristocratic," socialite" look to her.
>: > TCAXEL
>:
>: the junior league is a long standing souther tradition... the members
>: were the high society, the debutantes the daughters of the wealthy (or
>: genteely poor too) it has sort of a scarlett o'hara ring to it.
>:
>: dejah, who knows that the junior league does some very worthwhile
>: charitable stuff...

>It's not just Southern....national headquarters are in New York.

  Well...if that is New York as in New York City...NYC IS in southern NY
(State).  <g>

Cheers.