Is there really an "easy" triple jump?

Is there really an "easy" triple jump?

Post by pc10 » Mon, 07 Oct 1996 04:00:00


I can't help but notice that certain skaters get criticized in this
newsgroup, because they don't attempt a lot of triple jumps in their
programs (professional ranks). People complain that so-and-so only does
one easy triple and a double axel or maybe the skater doesn't attempt
any triples at all.

If the triple Salchow and triple-toe (and double-axel?) are supposedly
easy jumps, then why do some of the best jumpers who have no problem
with a triple lutz mess up on an "easy" triple toe, Salchow, or double
axel?  Examples: Kristi Yamaguchi has no problem with a lutz but stays
away from the triple Salchow (the jump she fell on at the Olympics).
Oksana Baiul
who is capable of a triple lutz (at least during the Olympics) seemed to
have trouble with any triple all last season. On the otherhand, other
skaters can do -- they complete the jump more often than not -- a
Salchow, triple-toe, or other jump though they don't have a triple lutz
in their arsenal.   Is there really such a thing as an "easy" triple
jump? Shouldn't consistency in landing an "easy" jump be just as
important as making failed attempts of a "harder" triple?    If not,
then maybe Rosalynn Sumners, Jill Trenary, and Katarina Witt should put
triple lutzes in their programs just for the sake of getting higher
marks for the attempts.

I'd like to see comments about this from anyone who is in the judging
ranks of
competitive skating.

 
 
 

Is there really an "easy" triple jump?

Post by pc10 » Mon, 07 Oct 1996 04:00:00

Repost (problem with server, sorry):

Quote:

> I can't help but notice that certain skaters get criticized in this
> newsgroup, because they don't attempt a lot of triple jumps in their
> programs (professional ranks). People complain that so-and-so only does
> one easy triple and a double axel or maybe the skater doesn't attempt
> any triples at all.

> If the triple Salchow and triple-toe (and double-axel?) are supposedly
> easy jumps, then why do some of the best jumpers who have no problem
> with a triple lutz mess up on an "easy" triple toe, Salchow, or double
> axel?  Examples: Kristi Yamaguchi has no problem with a lutz but stays
> away from the triple Salchow (the jump she fell on at the Olympics).
> Oksana Baiul who is capable of a triple lutz (at least during the Olympics) seemed to
> have trouble with any triple all last season. On the otherhand, other
> skaters can do -- they complete the jump more often than not -- a
> Salchow, triple-toe, or other jump though they don't have a triple lutz
> in their arsenal.   Is there really such a thing as an "easy" triple
> jump? Shouldn't consistency in landing an "easy" jump be just as
> important as making failed attempts of a "harder" triple?    If not,
> then maybe Rosalynn Sumners, Jill Trenary, and Katarina Witt should put
> triple lutzes in their programs just for the sake of getting higher
> marks for the attempts.

> I'd like to see comments about this from anyone who is in the judging
> ranks of competitive skating.


 
 
 

Is there really an "easy" triple jump?

Post by Ralph R » Tue, 22 Oct 1996 04:00:00

Quote:

>> If the triple Salchow and triple-toe (and double-axel?) are supposedly
>> easy jumps, then why do some of the best jumpers who have no problem
>> with a triple lutz mess up on an "easy" triple toe, Salchow, or double
>> axel?  Examples: Kristi Yamaguchi has no problem with a lutz but stays
>> away from the triple Salchow (the jump she fell on at the Olympics).
>> Oksana Baiul who is capable of a triple lutz (at least during the Olympics) seemed to
>> have trouble with any triple all last season. On the otherhand, other
>> skaters can do -- they complete the jump more often than not -- a
>> Salchow, triple-toe, or other jump though they don't have a triple lutz
>> in their arsenal.   Is there really such a thing as an "easy" triple
>> jump?

It is my impression that each skater has a different "comfort rating"
with the various jumps.  While they tend to be taught in  a particular
order of "ease"  the individual strengths and weaknesses of a skater
will determine which jumps seem to " work best " for them.  My son ,
who is just working on his doubles, loves the flip but hates the loop
and finds it more difficult than an axel.  I've heard preferences like
these stated by skaters at all levels.  Often, the real determining
factor with how well a jump is handled is whether it has enough speed
and flow to be used in combination.



 
 
 

Is there really an "easy" triple jump?

Post by HILL JANET SW » Tue, 22 Oct 1996 04:00:00

Quote:
>>> If the triple Salchow and triple-toe (and double-axel?) are supposedly
>>> easy jumps, then why do some of the best jumpers who have no problem
>>> with a triple lutz mess up on an "easy" triple toe, Salchow, or double
>>> axel?  

Some skaters have more trouble with edge jumps, some have more trouble
with toe-assisted jumps.  Some are just plain "spooked" by particular
jumps.  It's specific to the skater.  On the other hand, there really is a
"normal" list of what's harder than what.  Listing the singles that are
commonly doubled or tripled it goes:  toeloop, salchow (approximately
equal); loop, flip, lutz, axel.  

For most skaters, the salchow is the first double learned, though it may
be the toeloop, and after those two comes the loop.  The order learned,
which is a function of what's usually easiest to learn, doesn't always
correspond to what's easier or more reliable for a particular skater once
he/she has LEARNED the jump.  Sometimes the things that came the hardest
turn into the most reliable jumps, simply because the skater worked so
long and hard at it that her/his body has EVERYTHING about the
jump "hardwired", and all the common mistakes have been filtered out.

Quote:
>>> Is there really such a thing as an "easy" triple jump?

NO.  Though the toeloop comes as close as any.  

        janet swan hill