Are Skaters really Artists ? (Long)

Are Skaters really Artists ? (Long)

Post by VINCE-KASPR.. » Sun, 01 Jun 1997 04:00:00




Quote:


> >Other examples of athletic non-sports:
> >Gymnastics, Diving, Freestyle skiing, ski jumping, Boxing (except when
> >there is a non-technical knockout)

Here is an interesting observation...

Karate, Kung-Fu etc... are all sports, they have competitions and are
even in the Olympics...

Karate et al is a sport under what is called "Martial Arts*"  ^^^
Interesting eh?  { : > )

- - -  Leaundra

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Are Skaters really Artists ? (Long)

Post by Kathleen Bratt » Sun, 01 Jun 1997 04:00:00

Quote:
> Mark:
> >It is not a sport because the winner is determined by judges and a
> >subjective scoring scale, not by value or points/goals/time/whatever
> >scored.  This takes nothing away from Figure skating or any of the other
> >non-sports, but it is a fact.  

Not according to my Funk & Wagnalls _Standard_ _Dictionary_, which defines
sport as:  "(1) that which amuses in general; diversion; pastime (2) a
particular game or play pursued for diversion; esp. an outdoor or athletic
game, as baseball, tennis, swimming, etc."

etc. etc. (about 4 more definitions which clearly have nothing to do with
sport in the athletic sense.)

What I though is interesting about this dictionary definition is that
skating might still not be included, because possibly a "game" is
a competition in which two people or teams play simultaneously.  So, then
(because I really don't want to work) I looked up "game"; it is:  "(1) a
contest governed by set rules (2) pl. athletic competitions (3) a single
context forming part of a fixed series."  etc. etc.

So, then I looked up "contest" and "competition".  A contest is a
"competition, game", and a competition is "a striving against another or
others for some object; rivalry; a contest.".  So, skating is certainly a
competition, and since it's athletic it is thus (at least by the
dictionary definition) a sport.

But I don't really care . . . as long as bowling remains a sport, *that's*
what *I* care about.

:)

-- Kate

 
 
 

Are Skaters really Artists ? (Long)

Post by VINCE-KASPR.. » Sun, 01 Jun 1997 04:00:00



Quote:



> >Me:
> >>>...I just get
> >>>the feeling that I could take Nicole Bobek, put her out on the ice
> >>>in sweats, pop in a tape of one of my songs that she's never heard
> >>>before, and she'd create magic to it.

> >NotDeby:
> >>So...you think she choreographs her own work? That she is an Isadora
> >>Duncan type? She may well have choreographic talent, but I'm not aware
> >>that she creates her own work...do you know that for sure?

Last year's TOC piece that Nicole did was indeed choeographed by Nicole.
Story has it that she and her mom went to see Cirque de Sole (sp???).
Nicole was so moved by the show that she went out and bought a cassete of
it on the way home.  While listening to it in the car, she made her mom
pull over, she got out and right there on the side of the road started to
create (choreograph) her TOC performance.

 I don't know if it is entirely true, but it does make for a neat story.

-- Leaundra

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Are Skaters really Artists ? (Long)

Post by Jun Ya » Tue, 03 Jun 1997 04:00:00

Quote:
> Here is an interesting observation...

> Karate, Kung-Fu etc... are all sports, they have competitions and are
> even in the Olympics...

> Karate et al is a sport under what is called "Martial Arts*"  ^^^
> Interesting eh?  { : > )

Believe it or not, Martial arts *are* artistic in a different way from
dance or figure skating.  It can be both choreography for exhibition or
utilized in real fighting situations to defend oneself.  So it can be both
performed on stage and have practical use in real life.  If you don't
think martial arts are beautiful, try to watch Jackie Chan's movies or
even Elvis Stojko's "Dragon--the Bruce Lee Story" long program.  

jun

 
 
 

Are Skaters really Artists ? (Long)

Post by Deborah Burgoyn » Tue, 03 Jun 1997 04:00:00

Quote:




> > >Other examples of athletic non-sports:
> > >Gymnastics, Diving, Freestyle skiing, ski jumping, Boxing (except when
> > >there is a non-technical knockout)

> Here is an interesting observation...

> Karate, Kung-Fu etc... are all sports, they have competitions and are
> even in the Olympics...

> Karate et al is a sport under what is called "Martial Arts*"  ^^^
> Interesting eh?  { : > )

> - - -  Leaundra

I've been following this thread off and on for a while, and finally feel
compelled to insert my 2 cents.

Whether an activity is dubbed a "sport," an "art," a "recreation" or
whatever, is based on the function and purpose of the activity, not the
mere act.  Therefore all of these activities are variously art, sport,
etc., depending on their function and purpose at that time.  So, for
example, when I am skating merely as an aerobic exercise, it is
"exercise."  When I am rehearsing a program for a competition, or
skating in that competition, it's a "sport."  When I am goofing around
on the ice with my friends, it's "recreation," and when I am performing
an exhibition, it's "art."  (Possibly bad art, but art nevertheless.)
Most physical activities fall in multiple categories, even for one
person, and certainly fall in multiple categories for different people.
And sometimes, of course, they fall in multiple categories
simultaneously, as when a skater competes artistically.  I just started
working out with weights, and for me that is exercise, and exercise only
- I'll never compete, although if I did, it would be a sport, and I'll
never like it, so it certainly isn't recreation for me.

An analogy from a sedentary activity - is reading "recreation,"
"education," or "work?"  For me, all three at various times - depends on
why I'm doing it and what I'm reading.  Often it fits into multiple
categories at the same time.  (Reading can also be art, of course, if
you're doing interpretive reading for an audience.)

Deborah J. Burgoyne
"640K ought to be enough for anybody." - Bill Gates, 1981

 
 
 

Are Skaters really Artists ? (Long)

Post by Notde » Wed, 04 Jun 1997 04:00:00


writes:

Quote:




>> >Frank:
>> >>>...I just get
>> >>>the feeling that I could take Nicole Bobek, put her out on the ice
>> >>>in sweats, pop in a tape of one of my songs that she's never heard
>> >>>before, and she'd create magic to it.

>> >NotDeby:
>> >>So...you think she choreographs her own work? That she is an Isadora
>> >>Duncan type? She may well have choreographic talent, but I'm not
aware
>> >>that she creates her own work...do you know that for sure?

>Last year's TOC piece that Nicole did was indeed choeographed by Nicole.
>Story has it that she and her mom went to see Cirque de Sole (sp???).
>Nicole was so moved by the show that she went out and bought a cassete of
>it on the way home.  While listening to it in the car, she made her mom
>pull over, she got out and right there on the side of the road started to
>create (choreograph) her TOC performance.

> I don't know if it is entirely true, but it does make for a neat story.

Good lord! I think an actual mythos is beginning to spring up around
Nicole Bobek. This sounds 'so' much like some of the legends that surround
legendary ballerinas. In particular, this sounds very much like one of the
stories about the ballerina Marie Taglioni, who, while travelling by coach
in Russia, was stopped by highwaymen and made to dance for them on a rug,
right then and there (they were enraptured, of course, and let her go
unharmed  ")  ).

Wow! This has 'big' potential in creating a whole new mystique and drama
around figure skaters and skating. Tell me more  ").

Really...anybody got any good apocryphal stories of skaters, living or
dead?

NotDeby

"What a luxury it is to be alive, and female, and in a liquid state because of such male beauty." - Various.

"(My mind is) like a high-speed computer. But it only doodles."
 - Rosie O'Donnell
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"But I don't want to go among mad people," Alice remarked.
"Oh, you can't help that," said the Cat: "we're all mad here. I'm mad. You're mad."
"How do you know I'm mad?" said Alice.
"You must be," said the Cat, "or you wouldn't have come here."
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~