On having and not having a coach/Button

On having and not having a coach/Button

Post by PosterBo » Thu, 19 Nov 1998 04:00:00


Quote:

>I seem to recall reading about or hearing Button speak about how he and his
>buddies developed in the midst of WWII all these new things because they
were
>isolated -- because normal athletic events were of course suspended owing
to
>the war. Does anyone know how Button's coach figured in this, did he have
one
>at the time, and how active was the coach in the incredibly inventive
process?
>I tried to find info on this but could not.  A source will do.

>Tmoms

   Serge (pronounced sir-gay') Lussi (lucy), probably still owner/manager,
Holiday Inn, Lake Placid, NY.  Son of***'s coach.
    Or, why not just mail/Email Candid Productions, personal-Dick Button??

Cheers.

 
 
 

On having and not having a coach/Button

Post by PosterBo » Thu, 19 Nov 1998 04:00:00

    Forgot to ask, in my preceding post.....
    My recollection is that...in the US, at least...national championships
were held in all the WWII years...'39-'45...except the last two (44 & 45).
So, in what way did*** say he was isolated?  He wasn't in the seniors
picture through '43, unless I'm mistaken.

Thanks.

Quote:

>I seem to recall reading about or hearing Button speak about how he and his
>buddies developed in the midst of WWII all these new things because they
were
>isolated -- because normal athletic events were of course suspended owing
to
>the war. Does anyone know how Button's coach figured in this, did he have
one
>at the time, and how active was the coach in the incredibly inventive
process?
>I tried to find info on this but could not.  A source will do.

>Tmoms


 
 
 

On having and not having a coach/Button

Post by Tmom » Fri, 20 Nov 1998 04:00:00

I seem to recall reading about or hearing Button speak about how he and his
buddies developed in the midst of WWII all these new things because they were
isolated -- because normal athletic events were of course suspended owing to
the war. Does anyone know how Button's coach figured in this, did he have one
at the time, and how active was the coach in the incredibly inventive process?
I tried to find info on this but could not.  A source will do.

Tmoms

 
 
 

On having and not having a coach/Button

Post by Sandra Loosemor » Fri, 20 Nov 1998 04:00:00

Quote:

> I seem to recall reading about or hearing Button speak about how he
> and his buddies developed in the midst of WWII all these new things
> because they were isolated -- because normal athletic events were of
> course suspended owing to the war. Does anyone know how Button's
> coach figured in this, did he have one at the time, and how active
> was the coach in the incredibly inventive process?  I tried to find
> info on this but could not.  A source will do.

Button's coach was Gus Lussi, who played a *serious* role in the
technical development of the sport.  Lussi was the one who first
advocated the back spin position in the air for jumps, in particular.
We kind of take it for granted as the proper jump technique now, but
even up into the 70's there were still folks who jumped with their
legs uncrossed, or even crossed the other way.  Lussi was also
famous for refining spin technique; if Button was his star pupil for
jumping, Ronnie Robertson was his champion spinner.  Dorothy Hamill
and Paul Wylie, among others, also got their fabulous spins from
Gus Lussi.

Oddly enough, Lussi's sports background was in ski jumping, not
skating!  He was a Swiss guy who settled in Lake Placid and ran a
training camp there in the 30's and 40's.  In those days it was one of
the few places in the country that had ice during the summer.

For more information, you can read Button's autobiography from the 50's.
There was also a documentary made several years back called "The Man Who
Changed Figure Skating" (or something like that) in which Button and
Hamill and others paid tribute to Lussi.  I think it was shown on PBS.

-Sandra

 
 
 

On having and not having a coach/Button

Post by Tmom » Fri, 20 Nov 1998 04:00:00

<<Forgot to ask, in my preceding post.....
    My recollection is that...in the US, at least...national championships
were held in all the WWII years...'39-'45...except the last two (44 & 45).
So, in what way did*** say he was isolated?  He wasn't in the seniors
picture through '43, unless I'm mistaken.

Thanks.>>

As I recall it, he said they were not involved in international competitions,
and "free" to experiment.  I don't have it on tape, but I recall it because it
really struck me as true.  Course, I may be overly impressed with Button's
summa***laude from Harvard.  LOL.

Tmoms

 
 
 

On having and not having a coach/Button

Post by Tmom » Fri, 20 Nov 1998 04:00:00

Thanks, Sandra!!!

Tmoms

Subject: Re: On having and not having a coach/Button

Date: Thu, Nov 19, 1998 08:26 EST

Quote:

> I seem to recall reading about or hearing Button speak about how he
> and his buddies developed in the midst of WWII all these new things
> because they were isolated -- because normal athletic events were of
> course suspended owing to the war. Does anyone know how Button's
> coach figured in this, did he have one at the time, and how active
> was the coach in the incredibly inventive process?  I tried to find
> info on this but could not.  A source will do.

Button's coach was Gus Lussi, who played a *serious* role in the
technical development of the sport.  Lussi was the one who first
advocated the back spin position in the air for jumps, in particular.
We kind of take it for granted as the proper jump technique now, but
even up into the 70's there were still folks who jumped with their
legs uncrossed, or even crossed the other way.  Lussi was also
famous for refining spin technique; if Button was his star pupil for
jumping, Ronnie Robertson was his champion spinner.  Dorothy Hamill
and Paul Wylie, among others, also got their fabulous spins from
Gus Lussi.

Oddly enough, Lussi's sports background was in ski jumping, not
skating!  He was a Swiss guy who settled in Lake Placid and ran a
training camp there in the 30's and 40's.  In those days it was one of
the few places in the country that had ice during the summer.

For more information, you can read Button's autobiography from the 50's.
There was also a documentary made several years back called "The Man Who
Changed Figure Skating" (or something like that) in which Button and
Hamill and others paid tribute to Lussi.  I think it was shown on PBS.

-Sandra

 
 
 

On having and not having a coach/Button

Post by HILL JANET SW » Fri, 20 Nov 1998 04:00:00

Quote:

>    My recollection is that...in the US, at least...national championships
>were held in all the WWII years...'39-'45...except the last two (44 & 45).
>So, in what way did*** say he was isolated?  He wasn't in the seniors
>picture through '43, unless I'm mistaken.

Isolated from Europe from where, up until then, most of the development
and advancement and domination of the sport had come.  As with the
wildlife on the Galapagos Islands, when Button was separated from
"influences" of skaters outside this continent, he "evolved" in the
direction best suited for the place he found himself in.  

As for the national championships ..... US skaters had (and still have)
more in common with each other, even across the continent, than they do
with skaters on other continents.  And recall that skating was a MUCH
smaller sport then, many fewer skaters, many fewer coaches, and many of
THEM the product of the same coaches.

        janet
--