A Short Treatise on the Art of Falling Gently and Other Methods of Injury Prevention

A Short Treatise on the Art of Falling Gently and Other Methods of Injury Prevention

Post by Jean » Sat, 31 Jul 2004 20:36:04


<< From: gonnaskate >>

<< Do you know of a way to do ab exercises without engaging the neck muscles?

Yes. There are ab rollers, Weider AB and others, that have a neck and head
support cushion built into the product.

<<  I haven't been able to do crunches or anything else like them since a car
hit my bike and I landed on my head and neck. >>

Wow. I think that's the reason I prefer off road biking.

<< I've even tried one of those situp frames you put your head on and use your
arms to assist which just made my neck hurt worse. >>

Then the AB roller might not suit you. I've had neck problems too in the past
but the AB roller works for me. If you press you head back into the roller or
just relax your neck and let your abs do all the work that might help. Or try
reverse curls, where your hips come up slightly and everything else remains on
the mat.

Jeanne

 
 
 

A Short Treatise on the Art of Falling Gently and Other Methods of Injury Prevention

Post by Isiaf » Sat, 31 Jul 2004 21:18:59

Quote:

>I wouldn't describe a well executed fall as either a rope or a slide, but
>rather
>as a spring-like absorbsion, much alike how cats move.  

Fall like a rope is a very good and common way to describe a safe way to fall.

Bones don't compress like springs.

Quote:
>Also, if one practices so that the line between keeping from falling and
>having to
>fall is a continuity then one's falls would be softer.  It's when one's body
>isn't
>flexible/strong enough to blur that line that one takes splatters.

Is this clear to anyone, but the person that wrote it?

Quote:
>I don't know how one can even describe a controlled fall in the texts, since
>by definition, falling is an unexpected (and usually undesired) event.

So is skydiving not a fall or unintentional?

Quote:
> For
>instance, while one may be able to remain relaxed post-fall in a rink, one
>may
>not be able to do so on a ski slope, to keep from sliding down uncontrolled
>hundreds of feet.

Or vice versa.  Sliding upside down and backwards on a open slope is no big
deal.  On the other hand, sliding toward the boards at speed head first might
just tweak one's ability to relax.

Sling Skate

My recommended reading for body fat control:
http://www.geocities.com/~slopitch/drsquat/fredzig.htm

 
 
 

A Short Treatise on the Art of Falling Gently and Other Methods of Injury Prevention

Post by avid_danc » Sun, 01 Aug 2004 05:16:24

Quote:

> Fall like a rope is a very good and common way to describe a safe way to fall.

> Bones don't compress like springs.

Bones don't bend like a rope either.  These descriptions relate primarily to the
soft tissues surrounding the bones that give them the "quality" of being
flexible or pliable.

The reason I shun the rope analogy is that it gives a connotation that falls
are passive.  I believe controlled falls are relatively active, with the
faller/fallee actively trying to "match" the impact energy to dissipate
its effects in the least harmful way.  Cat-like.

Quote:
> >Also, if one practices so that the line between keeping from falling and
> >having to
> >fall is a continuity then one's falls would be softer.  It's when one's body
> >isn't
> >flexible/strong enough to blur that line that one takes splatters.

> Is this clear to anyone, but the person that wrote it?

Being able to control one's balance around the fall-over point allows one to
take the fall gracefully/softly rather than as a hard plop, because one then
has time to readjust the body for the impact.  It's one taking a fall rather
than having the fall thrust upon one.

Quote:
> So is skydiving not a fall or unintentional?

I believe the falls under discussion were primarily the ones related to
along-surface activities.  Sky-diving, ski-jumping, water-diving, etc.,
are hence not covered, although the landing portion for the first
two is substantially along-surface.  Does anyone consider the entry into
water the "fall" under discussion even though the height loss is certainly
a fall?

There's a distinction between falls one can break verses those that one
can't do much above.  There just isn't much one can do when falling twenty
stories from a building (without a chute, which probably wouldn't
deploy anyway).

Quote:
> Or vice versa.  Sliding upside down and backwards on a open slope is no big
> deal.  On the other hand, sliding toward the boards at speed head first might
> just tweak one's ability to relax.

You have a point.  Which means there is really no substantial differences in
falls one can "break," making the surrounding circumstance rather than the
activity the determining factor of how the break is handled.

 
 
 

A Short Treatise on the Art of Falling Gently and Other Methods of Injury Prevention

Post by e-skat » Sun, 01 Aug 2004 05:19:07

Quote:


> >Also, if one practices so that the line between keeping from falling and
> >having to
> >fall is a continuity then one's falls would be softer.  It's when one's body
> >isn't
> >flexible/strong enough to blur that line that one takes splatters.

> Is this clear to anyone, but the person that wrote it?

    I'm with you.  What the heck does this mean?!

Quote:

> >I don't know how one can even describe a controlled fall in the texts, since
> >by definition, falling is an unexpected (and usually undesired) event.

> So is skydiving not a fall or unintentional?

> > For
> >instance, while one may be able to remain relaxed post-fall in a rink, one
> >may
> >not be able to do so on a ski slope, to keep from sliding down uncontrolled
> >hundreds of feet.

> Or vice versa.  Sliding upside down and backwards on a open slope is no big
> deal.  On the other hand, sliding toward the boards at speed head first might
> just tweak one's ability to relax.

> Sling Skate

I think there is a big deal to each type of fall, having had each type
of fall.  I've hit the boards hard, fortunately able to turn.  Yes,
sliding toward the boards at speed head first totally negates any
ability to relax, at least for me.  Also, sliding down an icy 40
degree ski slope, open, yet with drop offs on either side full of
trees is not fun.  Oddly it's kind of slow motion.  I found myself
working at getting myself at least onto my side, then stopping myself
with a huge, I don't know how many feet, skid on my ski edges, trying
to dig them in and stop.  Either way, I don't think I was relaxed, nor
did I find a way in the future to get myself to relax.
 
 
 

A Short Treatise on the Art of Falling Gently and Other Methods of Injury Prevention

Post by GonnaSka » Sun, 01 Aug 2004 06:25:17

Quote:




>> >Also, if one practices so that the line between keeping from falling and
>> >having to
>> >fall is a continuity then one's falls would be softer.  It's when one's
>body
>> >isn't
>> >flexible/strong enough to blur that line that one takes splatters.

>> Is this clear to anyone, but the person that wrote it?

>    I'm with you.  What the heck does this mean?!

Well, I think it means that if one resists falling to the point that they
stumble around doing that 10 step pinwheel free-fall -- you know the one that
we've all done where we clatter around, tap dance, flail our arms and twist
ourselves into all kinds of impossible positions? -- one eventually drives
oneself to the ice with more force than would have occurred if they'd just let
go immediately. Sometimes the desire to NOT fall makes the inevitable falls
worse because we fight them too hard. But if one never practices "holding on"
to a move, they don't develop the skill.

I believe that there needs to be a healthy balance between striving to stay
upright and being willing to fall. But this balance is also very delicate.

I'm way too close to the "I'm not going to fall" end of the spectrum. I refuse
to fall and therefore I don't push myself. I don't even allow myself to get
into the position where I might stumble a bit. I'm overly cautious.

On the other hand, I've seen people way too close to the other end of the
spectrum who get into the habit of bailing out of moves instead of developing
the strength and fight to hold on. These people also delay their progress and
develop bad habits.

I call it a balance or a spectrum, the original poster called it a continuity
line. IMO, both communicate.

Hope this helps.

Gonna Skate

 
 
 

A Short Treatise on the Art of Falling Gently and Other Methods of Injury Prevention

Post by Isiaf » Sun, 01 Aug 2004 07:03:15

Random thoughts on falling:

- gymnastics and freestyle both have the daredevil element.  For some tricks at
some point, you must throw your body into a moment of zero control and possible
bad outcome while relying upon faith in something, such as, your instructor,
your leadups, or whatever.

- for ice skating, I note that the better skaters are always better fallers

- to skate like the better skaters, I assume that I must learn to fall like
them

- I am much better at knowing when I am at risk of a fall, when I am actually
falling, and knowing how to save a bad fall.  To paraphrase: Save a fall when I
can, fall well when I can't, and have the wisdom to know the difference.

- When I fall, I try to fall like a rope and NOT LIKE A BOARD. That is, I want
to get on the surface completely flat, preferably rolling or sliding.  On the
way down, I want as much of my body to hit the ice at as many different times
as possible, like judo like a rope.

Sling Skate

My recommended reading for body fat control:
http://www.geocities.com/~slopitch/drsquat/fredzig.htm

 
 
 

A Short Treatise on the Art of Falling Gently and Other Methods of Injury Prevention

Post by grun » Sun, 01 Aug 2004 08:58:21

Quote:
> >That's when I automatically assume the crunch position to keep my head from
> >hitting the ice.
> I have pulled neck muscles during a fall while keeping my head off the ice.  I
> had not thought of crunches as helping the neck muscles for skating falls,
> makes mucho sense.

If I'm standing up, or starting to fall backwards, and I relax all the
muscles of my body, the neck falls forwards, and my whole body tucks
inwards, no muscles required. Then I apply just a little muscle in the
neck - less than is needed to hold the head up - to stop the neck from
snapping back against the ice.Could be you are over-compensating and
using way too much neck muscle.

(I admit this doesn't make my chin tuck into my chest, but that isn't
really needed in an ice fall.)

People who are a bit nervous about something, like a fall, commonly
tighten up the muscles on both sides of all the joints. Maybe you are
fighting that. If you take a yoga class (they have daily classes at
many aerobics centers)? They will help you see just how much tension
you have in your muscles all the time.

 
 
 

A Short Treatise on the Art of Falling Gently and Other Methods of Injury Prevention

Post by jsl.. » Sun, 01 Aug 2004 10:46:20

The other week I took a freak fall off the back of my blades working on the
Tango.  one of those falls that if you try and catch yourself as you go
down, you can actually do more damage, especially to wrists etc.

Anyways, the muscles across my lower back tightened up really quickly
afterwards, to the point where the next day it hurt to do certain
activities... luckily, a deep tissue massage, focusing on the tight muscles
helped immensely.


Quote:
> > >That's when I automatically assume the crunch position to keep my head
from
> > >hitting the ice.

> > I have pulled neck muscles during a fall while keeping my head off the
ice.  I
> > had not thought of crunches as helping the neck muscles for skating
falls,
> > makes mucho sense.

> If I'm standing up, or starting to fall backwards, and I relax all the
> muscles of my body, the neck falls forwards, and my whole body tucks
> inwards, no muscles required. Then I apply just a little muscle in the
> neck - less than is needed to hold the head up - to stop the neck from
> snapping back against the ice.Could be you are over-compensating and
> using way too much neck muscle.

> (I admit this doesn't make my chin tuck into my chest, but that isn't
> really needed in an ice fall.)

> People who are a bit nervous about something, like a fall, commonly
> tighten up the muscles on both sides of all the joints. Maybe you are
> fighting that. If you take a yoga class (they have daily classes at
> many aerobics centers)? They will help you see just how much tension
> you have in your muscles all the time.