A Short Treatise on the Art of Falling Gently and Other Methods of Injury Prevention

A Short Treatise on the Art of Falling Gently and Other Methods of Injury Prevention

Post by grun » Wed, 28 Jul 2004 14:28:06


I have recently posted a draft of

  A Short Treatise on the Art of Falling Gently
  and Other Methods of Injury Prevention

at

  http://www.geocities.com/grunes/falling.html

I request suggestions on how this may be improved.

 
 
 

A Short Treatise on the Art of Falling Gently and Other Methods of Injury Prevention

Post by Jean » Wed, 28 Jul 2004 21:35:27

I'm getting an error message "connection error".

Jeanne

 
 
 

A Short Treatise on the Art of Falling Gently and Other Methods of Injury Prevention

Post by Ellen Arnol » Wed, 28 Jul 2004 23:48:23



Quote:
> I have recently posted a draft of

> A Short Treatise on the Art of Falling Gently
> and Other Methods of Injury Prevention

> at

> http://www.geocities.com/grunes/falling.html

Unlike Jeanne, I had no problem accessing this and it was wonderful. Thank
you for sharing it with us. I would be interested to read johns' take on
this, as well as Sling Skates' -- IIRC one of them always talks about
"falling like a rope, not like a board" which goes along with your
recommendations.

I know that fear of falling (and the possible sequelae thereof) really
limits my skating progress. I'm afraid to skate faster, to push myself, and
let's not even talk about jumping :D

Ellen

 
 
 

A Short Treatise on the Art of Falling Gently and Other Methods of Injury Prevention

Post by GonnaSka » Thu, 29 Jul 2004 03:23:17

Quote:

> A Short Treatise on the Art of Falling Gently
>  and Other Methods of Injury Prevention
>I request suggestions on how this may be improved.

Good for you for tackling this topic. It is important.

My first comment is that I've been reading for several minutes (even skimming
certain parts) and I still have yet to read anything about how to fall gently.
I can see how this other stuff might be interesting, but I don't consider it to
be particularly on the topic you've stated in your title. IMO, your actual
essay begins with the sentence, "Falls are mastered and maintained through
practice." I'd consider splitting the other stuff off to a separate article.

About this section:
"The ISI Skaters and Coaches Manual advises that you fall back directly onto
your rear end and stop. This places a tremendous stress on the sit bone and
lower spine."

I have taken the Learn to Skate classes at an ISI rink and I was not taught to
fall as you describe. I'm not sure if the coaches were not following the
manual, or if the manual has been updated since you've seen it. But to be
specific, I was told to AVOID falling backwards (exactly the opposite of what
you report) and shown how to do so. I was also taught that if I felt myself
going over backwards to tuck my chin to my chest. The instructors demonstrated
falling like a rope instead of a board (using a sideways fall in the examples).
They also demonstrated sliding through the fall to distribute the impact and
had us practice this. But most importantly, they showed us how to avoid falling
by keeping our hands low in front while skating, pressing down with our palms,
and to dip and place our hands on our knees if we felt ourselves going off
balance.

So I'm not sure that the following sentences are fair or accurate, "There are
two major organizations to which ice skaters in the USA belong, the ISI and the
USFSA. At last check, the instruction manuals of both organizations teach falls
that I consider dangerous, perhaps because they want something easy to teach in
60 seconds to a group, perhaps because many who write manuals for athletic
organizations do not participate in the sport itself, or perhaps because the
volunteers who write them are not always the best authors and teachers."

Most importantly, I'm a bit confused about your target audience. I'd suggest
splitting the information into different disciplines. Falling while ice skating
and possibly while roller skating or roller blading is a very different thing
than falling in other arenas. Doing that forward stepping, pinwheel free-fall
on skates can generate a sudden burst of speed and momentum which can really
increase an injury. Therefore, "letting go" in a skating fall is a key element.
I call it "getting low and letting go." I'm not sure that a kayaker would enjoy
reading the skating stuff, and vice versa. Right now, the article reads like it
is written by a skater with some general interest in other sports.

I'm not sure suggesting using mouse pads cut to size outside of the unwritten
section on protective gear is particularly helpful. Then there are two
unwritten sections on Protective Gear which could probably be combined into
one. I'd move the mouse pad suggestion into the Protective Gear section.

I might include a section on how to properly address an *** or child who has
just fallen so people can avoid the "evil" *** syndrome while still being
socially responsible. I personally believe it is important to remind children
to not do things which might injure themselves or others (like running and
sliding into the barrier at the skating rink) yet you seem to encourage it. I'm
not sure I agree with this philosophy.

I skipped the "Other Methods for Injury Prevention" sections because I didn't
have time to give them a considered response.

This seems to be an ambitious project and I think that determining your target
audience (as suggested above) would help you trim and organize it for more
effect.

Again, good for you for tackling this project! Good luck finishing it.

Gonna Skate

 
 
 

A Short Treatise on the Art of Falling Gently and Other Methods of Injury Prevention

Post by e-skat » Thu, 29 Jul 2004 06:06:26

Quote:

> I have recently posted a draft of

>   A Short Treatise on the Art of Falling Gently
>   and Other Methods of Injury Prevention

> at

>   http://www.geocities.com/grunes/falling.html

> I request suggestions on how this may be improved.

I would like post a link to your draft on my skating page if it's ok
with you.  If you want to check out my skating page first it's:
http://www.geocities.com/e_sk8r   I think this would be so helpful to
many people.

I would be glad to offer suggestions except I'm certainly not
knowledgable in this area, except in falling the wrong ways. My
husband, who was in martial arts for many years, tried working with me
on falling.  It might have helped a little...maybe.....

I think rssir posters "johns" or "sling skate" might be able to offer
you something.

 
 
 

A Short Treatise on the Art of Falling Gently and Other Methods of Injury Prevention

Post by Jean » Thu, 29 Jul 2004 23:02:29


<<   A Short Treatise on the Art of Falling Gently
  and Other Methods of Injury Prevention >>

Very interesting, thanks for posting.

<<The *** Athlete
A lucky few people are athletic throughout their lives>>

Keeping fit really isn't luck. Sometimes staying healthy is though.

I've book marked your site to read later. I'm hoping there's something in there
about the importance of strong abs and neck muscles for *** skaters who want
to keep their heads off the ice. I've found my neck to be my best friend -

Also, sideways falls are the worst for ***s. Those one foot hockey stops
where you are jolted sideways with little chance of recovering and land smack
sideways on your hip.

Great start to your draft.
Jeanne

 
 
 

A Short Treatise on the Art of Falling Gently and Other Methods of Injury Prevention

Post by Jean » Fri, 30 Jul 2004 21:06:30

<< From: grunes >>

<< Can you explain this in more detail? >>

<< >I'm hoping there's something in there

Quote:
>about the importance of strong abs and
>neck muscles >>

Sure. When I do an ab crunch I lift my shoulders off the mat as well as my
head. When I take a backwards fall I pretty much assume that position. Ab
crunches will work the neck muscles as well so I don't bother targeting just
the neck, it's already toned and strengthened from my ab exercises. A few times
my shoulders have hit the ice first and my feet have been higher than my head.
That's when I automatically assume the crunch position to keep my head from
hitting the ice. Hope this helps.

Jeanne

 
 
 

A Short Treatise on the Art of Falling Gently and Other Methods of Injury Prevention

Post by GonnaSka » Sat, 31 Jul 2004 04:11:33

quoting from me:

Quote:
>>they showed us how to avoid falling
>>by keeping our hands low in front while
>>skating, pressing down with our palms,
>>and to dip and place our hands on our
>>knees if we felt ourselves going off
>>balance

Then from grunes:

Quote:
>I am not a judge or coach, but would guess that pose is not always
>acceptable.

You might be making a joke here, but I wasn't suggesting the coaches at my rink
have us use this "pose" as a feature in our competitive programs when we feel
ourselves falling out of our toe-loops. It is just a way to get a first timer
(young or old or in-between) safely around the rink without flailing their arms
up and over their heads and thereby knocking themselves over backwards or
sideways. It works great and helps a skater get into the habit of tucking and
getting low before falling down. And honestly, the safety dip doesn't look half
bad, either. I've seen lots of skaters, elite or otherwise, do something
similar in their competitive programs.

I believe the art of NOT falling deserves a place in your essay. A brief
section on how to maintain control and balance and how to quickly drop into a
"safe" stance would be very helpful, IMO. And then a transition into learning
when to "let go" into a fall so you don't make things worse by stumbling around
picking up speed (assuming this is written for skaters).

But I don't want to suggest you take the essay in a direction you don't want to
go by dismissing all the stuff on physics and biology and whatnot. If that is
what you are really into, go for it, you just might want to change the title to
accommodate that slant.

I understand your desire to mimic textbook format, but I understood that you
wanted this to be a shorter piece. Could be another title issue, actually.

Perhaps the only thing you need to change is the title. ;-)

Again, good luck!

Gonna Skate

 
 
 

A Short Treatise on the Art of Falling Gently and Other Methods of Injury Prevention

Post by GonnaSka » Sat, 31 Jul 2004 04:21:08

Quote:

>Ab
>crunches will work the neck muscles as well so I don't bother targeting just
>the neck, it's already toned and strengthened from my ab exercises.

Do you know of a way to do ab exercises without engaging the neck muscles? I
haven't been able to do crunches or anything else like them since a car hit my
bike and I landed on my head and neck. Every time I try to do sit-ups my neck
seizes up and I can't do anything for a week or so. I've even tried one of
those situp frames you put your head on and use your arms to assist which just
made my neck hurt worse. This is a problem even when I'm doing my neck PT like
I'm supposed to. Then during my back problems I had to constantly push out my
tummy or my back hurt (to put it mildly). The result is that now my belly
button is a lot further away from my spine than I'd like it to be. Before all
of this I might have had a huge rear, but I always had nice, flat abs.

Skating seems to have toned my upper abs and around my ribcage pretty well, but
the mid and lower abs ... oy!

Gonna Skate

 
 
 

A Short Treatise on the Art of Falling Gently and Other Methods of Injury Prevention

Post by Isiaf » Sat, 31 Jul 2004 06:05:25

Quote:

>That's when I automatically assume the crunch position to keep my head from
>hitting the ice.

I have pulled neck muscles during a fall while keeping my head off the ice.  I
had not thought of crunches as helping the neck muscles for skating falls,
makes mucho sense.

Sling Skate

My recommended reading for body fat control:
http://www.geocities.com/~slopitch/drsquat/fredzig.htm

 
 
 

A Short Treatise on the Art of Falling Gently and Other Methods of Injury Prevention

Post by avid_danc » Sat, 31 Jul 2004 17:02:21

Quote:

> be particularly on the topic you've stated in your title. IMO, your actual
> essay begins with the sentence, "Falls are mastered and maintained through
> practice." I'd consider splitting the other stuff off to a separate article.

Duh... aren't most activities?

Quote:
> About this section:
> "The ISI Skaters and Coaches Manual advises that you fall back directly onto
> your rear end and stop. This places a tremendous stress on the sit bone and
> lower spine."

I guess if one has a really big and padded tush that one is willing to bruise,
then this may be permissible.  Otherwise, I would think that only on certain
falls where the landing angles are just right can one just use the butt.

Quote:
> I have taken the Learn to Skate classes at an ISI rink and I was not taught to
> fall as you describe. I'm not sure if the coaches were not following the
> manual, or if the manual has been updated since you've seen it. But to be
> specific, I was told to AVOID falling backwards (exactly the opposite of what
> you report) and shown how to do so. I was also taught that if I felt myself
> going over backwards to tuck my chin to my chest. The instructors demonstrated
> falling like a rope instead of a board (using a sideways fall in the examples).
> They also demonstrated sliding through the fall to distribute the impact and

I wouldn't describe a well executed fall as either a rope or a slide, but rather
as a spring-like absorbsion, much alike how cats move.  Note that house cats can
often jump downward some 10 feet without much ado.  The action consists of
maneuvering the body in such a way that some point makes contact with the
surface first and then the impact ripples through the rest of the body.
Naturally, body flexibility helps in this maneuvering and timing is the key
factor.  For instance, it's much more preferable to tuck something just at the
right time than prematurely, as the premature movement causes imbalance
and greater impact.

Also, if one practices so that the line between keeping from falling and having to
fall is a continuity then one's falls would be softer.  It's when one's body isn't
flexible/strong enough to blur that line that one takes splatters.

Quote:
> had us practice this. But most importantly, they showed us how to avoid falling
> by keeping our hands low in front while skating, pressing down with our palms,
> and to dip and place our hands on our knees if we felt ourselves going off
> balance.

> So I'm not sure that the following sentences are fair or accurate, "There are
> two major organizations to which ice skaters in the USA belong, the ISI and the
> USFSA. At last check, the instruction manuals of both organizations teach falls
> that I consider dangerous, perhaps because they want something easy to teach in
> 60 seconds to a group, perhaps because many who write manuals for athletic
> organizations do not participate in the sport itself, or perhaps because the
> volunteers who write them are not always the best authors and teachers."

I don't know how one can even describe a controlled fall in the texts, since
by definition, falling is an unexpected (and usually undesired) event.

Quote:
> Most importantly, I'm a bit confused about your target audience. I'd suggest
> splitting the information into different disciplines. Falling while ice skating
> and possibly while roller skating or roller blading is a very different thing
> than falling in other arenas. Doing that forward stepping, pinwheel free-fall
> on skates can generate a sudden burst of speed and momentum which can really
> increase an injury. Therefore, "letting go" in a skating fall is a key element.
> I call it "getting low and letting go." I'm not sure that a kayaker would enjoy
> reading the skating stuff, and vice versa. Right now, the article reads like it
> is written by a skater with some general interest in other sports.

In the thousands of falls I've taken in life, I find that the general "texture"
of the falls to be similar.  It's the after-fall actions that may differ.  For
instance, while one may be able to remain relaxed post-fall in a rink, one may
not be able to do so on a ski slope, to keep from sliding down uncontrolled
hundreds of feet.