Head of the Charles TV project

Head of the Charles TV project

Post by Bryan Barne » Wed, 24 Aug 1994 09:44:37


Next week I am going to get on the river and start scouting out camera
placements for my thesis project on the Head of the Charles.
(For those of you who don't know about this there is a posting on this
board somewhere, if you can't find it just write and I'll tell you the
details of the program.)
I would like to hear from those of you who have raced in the HOTC to
give me your thoughts on the placements. Where on the course are the critical
areas?  Where are the places most difficult to pass?  Where are the most
challenging areas to turn?  Where does the body start to give out?
I'll have eight cameras the day of the race, one at the start, one at the
finish, so I would like to hear you ideas on where the other six should
go and why.

I've already received so much help from all of you.  I'm keeping a list of
those folks who have been particularly helpful and you'll all get a free
copy of the finished product.

Oh by the way, I have never rowed before (crew is not a big sport in
semi-rural Georgia where I grew up) but because of this project I am
falling in love with the sport.  I've been working out on a Concept II
(nearly lost my lunch after a 2500 once,) and hope to try my hand on
the river when I get back to Boston.  

Thanks again for all the help.

Bryan Barnett

 
 
 

Head of the Charles TV project

Post by Jeffrey Jason Wooda » Thu, 25 Aug 1994 00:10:40

Camera placement.

Inside embuckment, Week's Footbridge.

 
 
 

Head of the Charles TV project

Post by Bryan Barne » Thu, 25 Aug 1994 01:28:15


: Camera placement.

: Inside embuckment, Week's Footbridge.

Thanks for the info.  What makes that spot a good place to put a camera?
I need some idea of what I will see there on the day of the race and
how it will make for good TV.  Hope to hear from you.
Bryan

 
 
 

Head of the Charles TV project

Post by Ed Ku » Thu, 25 Aug 1994 02:17:05

Bryan,

My suggestions for camera angles would be:

Start (as you indicated BU boathouse roof would work)
BU Bridge or somehow near Magazine Beach (good crowd of rowers here)
Near Riverside Boathouse (again crowd of people and good view of straight
                         shot through powerhouse stretch)
Western Ave Bridge looking towards Weeks Footbridge
          Lots of action here as people set up for the turn under the bridge
Near Radcliffe Boathouse
          Pick up the consequences of the choice of course and maybe some
          carnage.
Anderson Bridge looking west toward Harvard Boathouse
          Again crews setting up course for crucial corner in a straight
          section
Cambridge Boathouse
          Great crowd and definitely carnage as crews miss judge the sharp
          corner here. This turn is quite interesting if there is traffic.
Finish (of course)

 The suggestions are all based on places where there will be plenty of time
to see the crews coming and then follow them past. Also these spots are
where most of the crowd is and you get a good feel for the tactical aspects
of the Charles. Good luck with the project.

Ed Kupa

 
 
 

Head of the Charles TV project

Post by gbenn.. » Thu, 25 Aug 1994 23:10:13

You should contact Canadian Broadcasting Corp to inquire about the
stern-mounted in-boat cameras they have used for regatta coverage.  This would
permit start to finish coverage of your chosen crew & works well with
television.  It does suggest if you wa
nt to pick a crew which will pass a number of boats, you should coordinate with
regatta management.  Seedings take place fairly close to race day, which would
conflict with your thoughts
o
 
 
 

Head of the Charles TV project

Post by Jo Wa » Fri, 26 Aug 1994 05:27:40

Quote:


>Subject: Re: Head of the Charles TV project
>Date: 23 Aug 1994 16:28:15 GMT

>: Camera placement.
>: Inside embuckment, Week's Footbridge.
>Thanks for the info.  What makes that spot a good place to put a camera?
>I need some idea of what I will see there on the day of the race and
>how it will make for good TV.  Hope to hear from you.
>Bryan

...another good place is Weld Boathouse - if you can get on the balcony, there
are usually a few "good" collisions at the bridge in front of the boathouse.
 
 
 

Head of the Charles TV project

Post by Bryan Barne » Thu, 01 Sep 1994 12:00:01

: Bryan -

: I agree with most of Ed's placements (by the way, Hi Ed.  Long time no
: talk!). You should definitely, though, have one camera placed either on
: the Weeks footbridge looking downstream (i.e. toward start) or on the
: Boston side of the river just prior to the bridge.  In my experience, this
: bridge has some of the best carnage of the race and also tends to produce
: some of the biggest coxing mistakes in terms of steering.  (I can say this
: with confidence having contributed to the carnage and made many mistakes
: at this bridge!)  You might even find it worthwhile having a camaera
: looking upstream from the bridge towards Anderson bridge.  I always found
: that from just before Weeks to the past Newell Boathouse (the Harvard
: men's boathouse) was the most crucial part of the race (especially from a
: coxswain's point of view).  The spacing is so tight, also, that you should
: get some good side by side shots.

: That's my two cents.

: Travis Metz

I found a nifty spot just beyond Weeks on the Cambridge shore.  It looks
right through the Weeks arches with a good view of the river behind.  This
position can pan with action to a side view following the crews all the
way up to Anderson.
Thanks for the tip!

Bryan Barnett

 
 
 

Head of the Charles TV project

Post by Bryan Barne » Thu, 01 Sep 1994 12:05:08

: You should contact Canadian Broadcasting Corp to inquire about the
: stern-mounted in-boat cameras they have used for regatta coverage.           : This would permit start to finish coverage of your chosen crew & works well  : with television.  
: o

I'm currently investigating this option.  It could get pricey though, so I'm
shopping around.  Also in the USRowing rulebook it has a statement somewhere
in it that no device can transmit information from the boat during a race.
If I had a signal delivering the picture to a remote recorder, would this
violate that rule, and for that matter how strict is the HOTC on this?

Bryan Barnett

 
 
 

Head of the Charles TV project

Post by bma.. » Thu, 01 Sep 1994 23:04:57

Quote:


>: You should contact Canadian Broadcasting Corp to inquire about the
>: stern-mounted in-boat cameras they have used for regatta coverage

>I'm currently investigating this option.  It could get pricey though, so I'm
>shopping around.  Also in the USRowing rulebook it has a statement somewhere
>in it that no device can transmit information from the boat during a race.

Plus, it either better be a light camera or an understanding crew for them
to lug the extra weight for the distance.

BTW, don't forget that for the Championship 8 race, the banks will be
crammed with people (unless it's a *** day).  What may be a good location
for your camera now may be frustrating if you have a crowd in front.

Also, I don't know if anyone has mentioned just past the Eliot Bridge.  At
that point, there's a sharp turn to port.  Crews are supposed to take the
center arch, because if they don't, they often wind up crashing into the
BBN dock.  I'm hoping that Community Rowing will be at the American
Legion Hall all day (they were there last year).  This is on the
river just past the bridge and offers a great view close to the finish.
It would be worth talking to them to see how they might help.  Their
number is 617-782-9091.

Beth Mazur

Beth Mazur

 
 
 

Head of the Charles TV project

Post by Jay Feen » Fri, 02 Sep 1994 19:02:23

Quote:



>>: You should contact Canadian Broadcasting Corp to inquire about the
>>: stern-mounted in-boat cameras they have used for regatta coverage

>>I'm currently investigating this option.  It could get pricey though, so I'm
>>shopping around.  Also in the USRowing rulebook it has a statement somewhere
>>in it that no device can transmit information from the boat during a race.

>Plus, it either better be a light camera or an understanding crew for them
>to lug the extra weight for the distance.

.
.
.

These cameras have been used at the World Championships and the Goodwill Games
and the rule is set up so that a cox and/or crew can not communicate with a
coach on shore.  In this case it is a one way street even if someone wanted to
pick up the signal.  For people that have not seen these, they are not much
bigger than the rear 'pole light' that you see on small motor boats and also
used by some crews on the Charles for those late evening practices in the fall.

Cheers,

-Jay Feenan