way or weigh?

way or weigh?

Post by Lauren T. Sla » Fri, 21 Jul 1995 04:00:00


I'm almost positive it's "weigh" enough, or it least that was the way it
was spelled in the photocopied packet I got when I started coxing.....

I'd be interested to know the origins of this phrase either way.

Regards,
Lauren Slawe
University of Pennsylvania alum turned grad student.

 
 
 

way or weigh?

Post by Stuart Fo » Fri, 21 Jul 1995 04:00:00

I guess this depends on time and place.  An old Webster's Collegiate
(hardly the definitive source) lists "under weigh" as a variant of
"under way".  I presume "way enough" means to cease being "under way".
I'm sure the spelling varies outside of the United States.

I prefer to think "way enough" means stop rowing and "weigh enough"
means stop eating.

--
Stuart Fogg
Diablo Valley College
Pleasant Hill, CA 94523


 
 
 

way or weigh?

Post by Kendal Wol » Sat, 22 Jul 1995 04:00:00

Quote:
> I guess this depends on time and place.  An old Webster's Collegiate
> (hardly the definitive source) lists "under weigh" as a variant of
> "under way".  I presume "way enough" means to cease being "under way".
> I'm sure the spelling varies outside of the United States.

                ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Isn't it an American phrase anyway?  Over the pond here, the cox would
(should) say "Easy there" or "Easy oars"....

Trev

Sudbury RC

              ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
One could just say, "let her run." I like to use this command when there
is no need to be afraid if the rowers don't stop. In my oppinion, "weigh
enough" (that's how I was taught) should only be used when there is a
hint of concern. My rowers know this and and are ready to "check it
down" to hold us still in the water. Just my $.02.


 "to row is human,         <==O=O=O=O==>-
 to cox is divine"           /   /    ---        Smile  :-)  Smile

 
 
 

way or weigh?

Post by Joel Furt » Sat, 22 Jul 1995 04:00:00



Quote:
> I'm almost positive it's "weigh" enough, or it least that was the way it
> was spelled in the photocopied packet I got when I started coxing.....

> I'd be interested to know the origins of this phrase either way.

> Regards,
> Lauren Slawe
> University of Pennsylvania alum turned grad student.

Here goes...

It's "weigh", as in "Weigh anchor".  It means lift.  You weigh enough to allow
the boat to run, and then let fall or drop, etc.

Nautical in origin, like gunwale and the port/starboard thing.

joel

Joel A. Furtek     Coach, Novice Women's Rowing    On Yule Farm
YLC - EARC 89,90     University of ***ia          with Carol
Grad Ex Phys           Varsity in 1995-6!           Kona & Elsa

 
 
 

way or weigh?

Post by STEVEGAN » Sun, 23 Jul 1995 04:00:00

This is entirely unverified, but I have heard that the command was
originally something to the effect of 'weigh and up', whereupon the crew
manning the oars on a whaleboat or similar craft that was nearing the pier
would stop rowing, and lift the oars away from the sides of the boat, to a
vertical position to avoid interfering with the docking of the boat.  This
goes along the same lines as the origin for port, that is, the side of the
boat that lands at the dock, and starboard, from steer board, or the side
of the boat where the steering rudder was held, especially if it was not
of a fixed-in-place variety, which might commonly be directly astern...
 
 
 

way or weigh?

Post by William Wadswort » Tue, 25 Jul 1995 04:00:00

Quote:

> > I guess this depends on time and place.  An old Webster's Collegiate
> > (hardly the definitive source) lists "under weigh" as a variant of
> > "under way".  I presume "way enough" means to cease being "under way".
> > I'm sure the spelling varies outside of the United States.
>                 ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

> Isn't it an American phrase anyway?  Over the pond here, the cox would
> (should) say "Easy there" or "Easy oars"....
>                              ^^^^^^^^^^^^

> Trev

> Sudbury RC

     "Easy oars" is a corruption of "Easy all" (as opposed to "Easy Bow four" etc.)

W.W.
ECBC (Oxon.)

 
 
 

way or weigh?

Post by Hamilton Richards Jr » Tue, 25 Jul 1995 04:00:00


Quote:

>It's "weigh", as in "Weigh anchor".  It means lift.  You weigh enough to allow
>the boat to run, and then let fall or drop, etc.

That's where the confusion comes from, I think. A ship "weighs anchor" in order to
get "under way". My Pocket Oxford defines "under way" (under "way" :-) as "not
anchored, in motion, in progress". And among its definitions of "way" is "advance
in some direction, impetus, progress".

So the forward motion of a boat is its "way", and the command "way enough" means
"that's motion enough", i.e., let the boat cease moving.

--Ham

 
 
 

way or weigh?

Post by BradInD » Wed, 26 Jul 1995 04:00:00

Since the nature of a command is that it is spoken rather than written
(save in an instruction book) it is immaterial how you spell "way enough".
Same problem as "forward HACH"
:=>
Brad Gaylord
 
 
 

way or weigh?

Post by Rachel Quarre » Wed, 26 Jul 1995 04:00:00


Quote:

>               ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
> One could just say, "let her run." I like to use this command when there
> is no need to be afraid if the rowers don't stop. In my oppinion, "weigh
> enough" (that's how I was taught) should only be used when there is a
> hint of concern. My rowers know this and and are ready to "check it
> down" to hold us still in the water. Just my $.02.


>  "to row is human,         <==O=O=O=O==>-
>  to cox is divine"           /   /    ---        Smile  :-)  Smile

Except that if you have been in crews or listened to coaches who use the
phrase "let her run" to squeeze out more time on the recovery (the concept
of the boat "running underneath you" being to do with flow and rhythm of
the recovery/slide) then you can get in all sorts of trouble.  

But this is an Anglo/American disagreement.  I tend to use our standard
"easy oars/easy all" followed by "let it glide" rather than "drop" if I
specifically want the crew to glide balanced (eg for a pretty landing..;)
If not, you tend to get someone shifting their weight or leaning around,
which rather spoils the picturesque effect.

RQ.
Oxford.

http://sable.ox.ac.uk/~quarrell/
_________________________________________________
Just row it.

 
 
 

way or weigh?

Post by Wolfram Thie » Fri, 28 Jul 1995 04:00:00

Hey there!
I did write something! Where did it go?
Anyway it was something to the extend of this:

I've really enjoyed reading about "way or weigh?". Especially the
response that "weigh enough" means "Stop eating".
I'm positive that someone from Britain told me that it's "weigh". An
American from Southern California told me that the proper command would
be "let her run".
Here in Long Beach our coxwain used "let it run" for stops with the
blades off the water and "weigh enough" for letting the blades drag. That
was pretty confusing I tell you. There were few times when I got it right.

In German we only have one command:"Ruder halt!" And there is no question
about spelling. So clean up your language!

Wolf Thiele

P.S.: Don't take me too seriously!

 
 
 

way or weigh?

Post by David Sima » Fri, 28 Jul 1995 04:00:00

[hack, chop]

Quote:

>Here in Long Beach our coxwain used "let it run" for stops with the
>blades off the water and "weigh enough" for letting the blades drag. That
>was pretty confusing I tell you. There were few times when I got it right.

>In German we only have one command:"Ruder halt!" And there is no question
>about spelling.

I've always taken 'weigh enough' to mean 'stop whatever it is you are
doing NOW', as in "WEIGH ENOUGH!!" (heard from somewhere just before
slamming into a channel bouy).

For 'stop rowing, blades off the water' I use 'strike it'.  I'm not sure
where I first heard this phrase.  Anybody else use it?

David S.

 
 
 

way or weigh?

Post by Ihan K » Sat, 29 Jul 1995 04:00:00

This has been my take on the subject:

'weigh enough' means stop rowing and let the blades rest on the water.
'let it run' means stop rowing and keep the blades off the water, w/ layback,
  arms away (elbows locked).
'hold water" means stop rowing immediately and check down the boat with the
  blades. (to avoid one obstacle or another). usually preceded by "OH SH*T!!"

ihan

amherst college ra

 
 
 

way or weigh?

Post by fredp.. » Thu, 03 Aug 1995 04:00:00

My daughter returned from Ithaca College Crew Camp with the command " Weigh and Up"  which when
put into 'swainese could be either "Waynuh" or "Weighnuh" . Issued when rowing it is "Down to the
gunwales", when carrying a boat, stop.

Viking Rowing Club, Ventnor, NJ uses "Let her run" to stop rowing and lay blades flat or to stop walking
when carrying.

 
 
 

way or weigh?

Post by D. Brent Wils » Thu, 03 Aug 1995 04:00:00

Quote:

>My daughter returned from Ithaca College Crew Camp with the command " Weigh and Up"  which when
>put into 'swainese could be either "Waynuh" or "Weighnuh" . Issued when rowing it is "Down to the
>gunwales", when carrying a boat, stop.
>Viking Rowing Club, Ventnor, NJ uses "Let her run" to stop rowing and lay blades flat or to stop walking
>when carrying.

Actually the command is "weigh enough".  Granted, it sounds like
waynuff...etc.  We actually use the term on land as well, so we stop
while carrying the boat when we hear this command.

Brent Wilson