Architectural student still has boat house design question !

Architectural student still has boat house design question !

Post by muff.. » Wed, 26 Feb 1997 04:00:00


I am a second year architecture student in Philadelphia.  Our second
project this semeter involves designing a boathouse.  I have never rowed
or been inside a boathouse so I was looking for some input.  What do you
like in th boathouses you have been in or used?  What don't you like?
What do you wish you had in your boathouse? What exactly do you use the
boathouse for?

Thanks


 
 
 

Architectural student still has boat house design question !

Post by UserNam » Sat, 01 Mar 1997 04:00:00

Quote:

> project this semeter involves designing a boathouse.  I have never rowed
> or been inside a boathouse so I was looking for some input.  What do you
> like in th boathouses you have been in or used?  What don't you like?
> What do you wish you had in your boathouse? What exactly do you use the
> boathouse for?

> Thanks



As an architect and a rower, some things to consider:
-separate the big boats (8's and 4's) from the singles and doubles. Best to have separate bays
-Make sure there's adequate maneuver room between racked boats and boats coming out of the boat house.
-Provide a big space out of bay space for oar racks
-Don't rack boats too high. not a good idea if the crew has to get up on a ladder to unrack
-Best boathouses are two story. 1st floor is all bay with storage in back for gear. Second floor should be locker room, erg room,
 weight room, bathroom and shower and if you've got some dollars, a large room with balcony overlooking
 the water.

need more??

 
 
 

Architectural student still has boat house design question !

Post by Chri » Sat, 01 Mar 1997 04:00:00

I'm not an archetect, but the best place for long 8's oars are deeply
(2'-3' down) recessed 4'-5' square sections in the slab.  To hold the
oars upright, use wooden racks w/ holes.  Locate one storage area
between each set of doors, but touching the outside wall.  This probably
won't be enough space for all the oars, hence additional racks (rolling
and/or fixed) could be needed for sculler's oars.  Make the boathouse
much bigger than you think you need, since most boathouses grow quickly
once there's a decent facility for members to use.

best of luck,
chris

 
 
 

Architectural student still has boat house design question !

Post by POWER » Mon, 03 Mar 1997 04:00:00

With all the good suggestions for this wonderful boathouse, unfortunately,
do not forget an excellent security system, including a magnetic card or
code setup that goes directly to a proprietary location and then to 911
upon activation.  We have had a felony theft of approx $ 10,000--all of
our engines.  Motion detectors and smoke detectors are essential these
days--dad but true.

Gordon L. Pizor
CoDirector/Head Coach
Wilmington Youth Rowing Assn
Gordon L. Pizor
power10

 
 
 

Architectural student still has boat house design question !

Post by Robert Eik » Mon, 03 Mar 1997 04:00:00

Don't forget to spec out a washer and dryer.

--

"That's the sound of a paradigm shifting without a clutch."    -- Dogbert

 
 
 

Architectural student still has boat house design question !

Post by Koster J.A » Tue, 04 Mar 1997 04:00:00

I once saw a boathouse with a huge metal rack full of boats up against
the sealing. This rack could be lowered with some sort of wynch system.
Looked to work pretty well as a space saver.
--
  Adriaan Koster
  A.S.R. Nereus,
  Computerscience, VU Amsterdam

  voice: +31 20 4447666

 
 
 

Architectural student still has boat house design question !

Post by RowerD » Sat, 08 Mar 1997 04:00:00

Quote:

>I'm not an archetect (sic), but the best place for long 8's oars are
deeply
>(2'-3' down) recessed 4'-5' square sections in the slab.  To hold the
>oars upright, use wooden racks w/ holes..... <other stuff left out>

I'm not an architect either, but... Yes indeed, the traditional way of
storing oars has been with the handle down, with the blades up.  However,
since the advent of composite blades, which tend to develop leaks around
the blade and accumulate water, and thus rot out the handles, I think a
better way would be to store them upside down, handle down and blade up. I
suggested this to the guy at our club who is in charge of such things, and
he frowned, since this is a more difficult problem....but using his MIT
engineering background, he designed such a rack where the oars are
supported by the buttons with the blades down. This seems to have worked
well.  I have also been a member of a club with blades set in holes in the
slab where such holes in the slab were regularly flooded by water, rotting
the handles from the other end.

Lots of good suggestions in this thread. I would tend NOT to look at the
houses on Boathouse Row as models...these were built piecemeal over
decades in the late 1800's, and may be functionally suboptimal, though
they may nonetheless have a lot of character. I would suggest going to the
Row and seeing what the rowers do and how they function, etc., (this
includes loading onto trailers, etc....i recall in particular lifting
boats over fences) and designing your boathouse accordingly. Then i would
run your design by an oarsman, just to be sure you didn't do anything
stupid.

My favorite architectural feature on Boathouse Row are the 2 men's toilets
in Vesper,  which face each other open in a little octagon shaped
room..."hey, buddy, you done with that sports section?"

Greg P.

 
 
 

Architectural student still has boat house design question !

Post by rodlaw.. » Sun, 09 Mar 1997 04:00:00

Quote:

>Yes indeed, the traditional way of
>storing oars has been with the handle down, with the blades up.  However,
>since the advent of composite blades, which tend to develop leaks around
>the blade and accumulate water, and thus rot out the handles, I think a
>better way would be to store them upside down, handle down and blade up.

They say there's no such thing as a new invention; they've all been thought of
before.

Rod.
Disclaimer; the opinions expressed above are not necessarily yours.

 
 
 

Architectural student still has boat house design question !

Post by RowerD » Tue, 11 Mar 1997 04:00:00


Quote:

> ...
>They say there's no such thing as a new invention; they've all been
thought of
>before.

Hey, I didn't claim i invented the idea of storing oars blades down...this
just seems like common sense to me, even though people still do it the
other way.

Greg P.

 
 
 

Architectural student still has boat house design question !

Post by rodlaw.. » Thu, 13 Mar 1997 04:00:00

Quote:

>> ...
>>They say there's no such thing as a new invention; they've all been
>thought of
>>before.

>Hey, I didn't claim i invented the idea of storing oars blades down...this
>just seems like common sense to me, even though people still do it the
>other way.

Check what you actually wrote, and maybe you'll see what I mean ..... :-)
I was only joking. BTW, we store ours horizontally, so we get the best of both
worlds.

Rod.
Disclaimer; the opinions expressed above are not necessarily yours.

 
 
 

Architectural student still has boat house design question !

Post by ooo.. » Tue, 18 Jan 2005 12:00:54

You might try
http://www.ScienceOxygen.com/design59.html
http://www.ScienceOxygen.com/design77.html

It is just with a collection of links about
boat design and house design.  You might just
take a look for information...

Quote:

> I am a second year architecture student in Philadelphia.  Our second
> project this semeter involves designing a boathouse.  I have never
rowed
> or been inside a boathouse so I was looking for some input.  What do
you
> like in th boathouses you have been in or used?  What don't you like?
> What do you wish you had in your boathouse? What exactly do you use
the
> boathouse for?

> Thanks



 
 
 

Architectural student still has boat house design question !

Post by Donal Cas » Tue, 18 Jan 2005 19:44:38

Due to proximity of water flooding is potentially a problem in many
locations.
Personally Im looking at designing/building a boat house or picking up
someone elses design and building.

The systems Im particularly interested in are:-

Systems to automatically raise racks as flood water ingresses.
OR to raise the whole building as water levels rise.

In holland they have houses built with this type of system so not
beyond the wit of man to mitigate flood damage to boats. A stocked
boat house can easily have 250000 worth of boats so its an area worth
lookiing at in detail.

Anyone who is similarly interest please feel free to keep in contact.

Regards

Donal

 
 
 

Architectural student still has boat house design question !

Post by Kit Davie » Tue, 18 Jan 2005 21:10:16

Quote:

> You might try
> http://www.ScienceOxygen.com/design59.html
> http://www.ScienceOxygen.com/design77.html

> It is just with a collection of links about
> boat design and house design.  You might just
> take a look for information...


>>I am a second year architecture student in Philadelphia.  Our second
>>project this semeter involves designing a boathouse.  I have never

> rowed

>>or been inside a boathouse so I was looking for some input.  What do

> you

>>like in th boathouses you have been in or used?  What don't you like?
>>What do you wish you had in your boathouse? What exactly do you use

> the

>>boathouse for?

>>Thanks



This thread may be of interest to you

http://groups-beta.google.com/group/rec.sport.rowing/browse_frm/threa...

Kit

 
 
 

Architectural student still has boat house design question !

Post by Joseph Meeha » Tue, 18 Jan 2005 23:21:52

Quote:

>> I am a second year architecture student in Philadelphia.  Our second
>> project this semeter involves designing a boathouse.  I have never
>> rowed or been inside a boathouse so I was looking for some input.
>> What do you like in th boathouses you have been in or used?  What
>> don't you like? What do you wish you had in your boathouse? What
>> exactly do you use the boathouse for?

>> Thanks



    I have two factors that are important to me personally.

    First is the practical.
        Easy safe access and safe storage of the boats
        Possible separation of club owned and privately owned boats and
equipment
        Room for activities such as training or social activities
        Storage for other equipment

    Second is the look and feel.  Efficiency is important and it must work,
but somehow the feel of the old boathouse has a value that can not be
measured.

--
Joseph Meehan

    Waiting for the thaw ...

 
 
 

Architectural student still has boat house design question !

Post by Sime » Thu, 20 Jan 2005 04:47:47

Quote:

> I am a second year architecture student in Philadelphia.  Our second
> project this semeter involves designing a boathouse.  I have never
rowed
> or been inside a boathouse so I was looking for some input.  What do
you
> like in th boathouses you have been in or used?  What don't you like?
> What do you wish you had in your boathouse? What exactly do you use
the
> boathouse for?

> Thanks



As a former club bar steward (yes, I have heard that one before)I'd say
don't forget about the economics of running a rowing club.  For a lot
of UK clubs around half of the annual income comes from the bar and
from hiring out a room for parties, exercise classes etc. I don't know
who the occupiers of your clubhouse are to be, but even if they are
supported entirely by grants and subscriptions extra cash is always
useful.  The ability to accommodate 50 plus party guests is crucial to
the survival of many clubs.  However, they must be separated from the
boats and gym equipment. The room used for such events can be a
warm-up/ergo/circuit training area during normal club use, provided all
of the equipment in it can be moved to another room or stacked up out
of the way (i.e. no heavy gym machines in this area).  A small room
downstairs for the beer kegs is a good idea.

As a construction project manager I work with a lot of architects.  The
simple fact that you're seeking out a "virtual user group" means you're
already on the right track.  Good luck!