advice for a beginner?

advice for a beginner?

Post by John Greenl » Mon, 04 Feb 2013 15:37:33


I think I'll start a new thread with Carl's remarks about speed, stability, weight, strength, etc,
and some new questions from me.

--John G

 
 
 

advice for a beginner?

Post by John Greenl » Tue, 05 Feb 2013 00:43:33


Am 31.01.2013 18:14, schrieb John Greenly:
this is fantastic- I'm so happy to have engaged your interest, and I have lots of questions, will need some time to think first.  I can't believe I can actually talk about things like this with one of the great designers!!

Maybe you should then get into one of Carl's shells meanwhile?

Some months back, a couple of juniors on a training camp at our boathouse approached me and asked if the CD shells are any good. I only replied to them 'well, I bought two of them, does that answer your question?'.

So, I had a good time fiddling around with the two beauties, even though it was just in the boathouse and I only swapped riggers from one to the other (they share a rack so only one can sleep fully rigged).

Now I didn't need the second because the first one was beaten up by the time. Quite the contrary - my older boat (still my primary boat) has seen HEAVY use and has been the object of some more or less intentional tests for rigidity. I only couldn't let go of it to get a sectional boat. So much for boat love...
BTW, the boat in question features quite prominently on Darryl Strickler's book (twice!, spot the second pic).

Another story: I had a friend who needed sculling lessons for university. So I had her come to our boathouse and gave her a couple of lessons in our beginners plastic shells. Soon I thought that progress was too slow for the limited time and sat her in my boat. From that point on she started sculling, not fighting to survive. Since then, I repeatedly put beginners in my boat to give them confidence and something to aim for. It always helped people to get the feel for the essential parts of sculling and what to strive for. The boat is very responsive and 'helpful' (Charles can elaborate).

Contact the CD3 guys, you will enjoy the experience.

 
 
 

advice for a beginner?

Post by John Greenl » Sat, 09 Feb 2013 00:18:34

I'd like to say  a very big Thank You!  to all who have welcomed me to RSR and taken the time to think about and contribute to this discussion.  I think I now have a much more realistic idea of what to expect, and what to look for, as I venture into other boats.  I hope I can come up with some useful things to contribute to RSR myself in the future.

again,
very many thanks,
John G

Quote:

> this thread is a classic example of why RSR has lasted for 20 years and is in rude health (as debated in the other ongoing thread posted by Alistair P).  Someone new to RSR has come in with questions for consideration, and the collected experts out there have welcomed them, and replied in detail, seriously, and at length.  I had much the same experience with my first post 11 years ago (asking a very basic question about "an Idiot's guide to rigging").  Tends to make you want to hang around.


 
 
 

advice for a beginner?

Post by Charles Carrol » Tue, 12 Feb 2013 06:36:45



Am 31.01.2013 18:14, schrieb John Greenly:
this is fantastic- I'm so happy to have engaged your interest, and I have
lots of questions, will need some time to think first.  I can't believe I
can actually talk about things like this with one of the great designers!!

Maybe you should then get into one of Carl's shells meanwhile?

Some months back, a couple of juniors on a training camp at our boathouse
approached me and asked if the CD shells are any good. I only replied to
them 'well, I bought two of them, does that answer your question?'.

So, I had a good time fiddling around with the two beauties, even though it
was just in the boathouse and I only swapped riggers from one to the other
(they share a rack so only one can sleep fully rigged).

Now I didn't need the second because the first one was beaten up by the
time. Quite the contrary - my older boat (still my primary boat) has seen
HEAVY use and has been the object of some more or less intentional tests for
rigidity. I only couldn't let go of it to get a sectional boat. So much for
boat love...
BTW, the boat in question features quite prominently on Darryl Strickler's
book (twice!, spot the second pic).

Another story: I had a friend who needed sculling lessons for university. So
I had her come to our boathouse and gave her a couple of lessons in our
beginners plastic shells. Soon I thought that progress was too slow for the
limited time and sat her in my boat. From that point on she started
sculling, not fighting to survive. Since then, I repeatedly put beginners in
my boat to give them confidence and something to aim for. It always helped
people to get the feel for the essential parts of sculling and what to
strive for. The boat is very responsive and 'helpful' (Charles can
elaborate).

Contact the CD3 guys, you will enjoy the experience.