I've seen it all now

I've seen it all now

Post by colmc » Fri, 31 Oct 2003 03:02:12


Usually when I go to my local gym I see some pretty bizzarre techniques on
the concept 2, but tonight I saw something that really took the biscuit...
not so much bad technique as just...well simply OuT Of ThiS WorLd! Imagine a
little terrier dog manically trying to hump a stick, and you're still a
million miles away from the unique viewing experience I encountered. Must
have been obvious that i found this amusing as some guy went (and I quote
verbatim) "ha!, you laughing at that woman on the rowing machine, ha ha!"

anyway...

 
 
 

I've seen it all now

Post by James Blyth » Fri, 31 Oct 2003 04:10:05

I can imagine that if I have to... just can't imagine how you could do an
action like that on a C2. What represents the terrier dog? The woman? The
machine? Assuming that you mean the woman, is the 'stick' the machine or the
handle? Was she sat on the machine in the usual manner (i.e. on the seat)
while she was 'manically humping' it or had she failed to grasp even that
element of using it? Has she been corrected in her technique, or banned from
the gym for trying to procreate with the equipment?

And what happened to the poor terrier?

I'd ask for precise details of what she was doing, but I'm about to cook tea
so perhaps not. Anyway...

James.


Quote:
> Usually when I go to my local gym I see some pretty bizzarre techniques on
> the concept 2, but tonight I saw something that really took the biscuit...
> not so much bad technique as just...well simply OuT Of ThiS WorLd! Imagine
a
> little terrier dog manically trying to hump a stick, and you're still a
> million miles away from the unique viewing experience I encountered. Must
> have been obvious that i found this amusing as some guy went (and I quote
> verbatim) "ha!, you laughing at that woman on the rowing machine, ha ha!"

> anyway...


 
 
 

I've seen it all now

Post by Richard Packe » Fri, 31 Oct 2003 04:03:39


Quote:
> I can imagine that if I have to... just can't imagine how you could do an
> action like that on a C2.

The most out-of-this-world technique I've yet seen went something like this:

Start at frontstops but with an exaggerated forward body lean.

Bum-shove without changing the body angle at all, all the way to backstops.

Draw the handle back, at chin height (elbows out), finishing with a very
exaggerated backwards body lean.

Return to frontstops by first bending the legs, then following it with the
body.

Repeat at a 1:1 stroke / recovery ratio, rating mid 20s for about 2 minutes.

It had to be seen to be believed.

Richard

 
 
 

I've seen it all now

Post by James Blyth » Fri, 31 Oct 2003 07:12:39

Quote:

> Draw the handle back, at chin height (elbows out), finishing with a very
> exaggerated backwards body lean.

> Return to frontstops by first bending the legs, then following it with the
> body.

> Repeat at a 1:1 stroke / recovery ratio, rating mid 20s for about 2
minutes.

> It had to be seen to be believed.

Ah but you've forgotten the whole 'hold the handle from underneath for 10
strokes because that works different muscles (sic)' trick. I love that one.

But does any of this resemble a terrier manically humping a stick? Let's
stay on-topic here.

James.

 
 
 

I've seen it all now

Post by David Gillar » Fri, 31 Oct 2003 18:52:39

Quote:
> Ah but you've forgotten the whole 'hold the handle from underneath for 10
> strokes because that works different muscles (sic)' trick. I love that

one.

Best expression I've heard is gym-jesters. Haven't you forgotten to mention
the fingerless weightlifting gloves and chicken legs (only ever workout the
upper body)?

 
 
 

I've seen it all now

Post by colmc » Fri, 31 Oct 2003 19:40:31

Quote:
>Best expression I've heard is gym-jesters. Haven't you forgotten to mention
>the fingerless weightlifting gloves and chicken legs (only ever workout the
>upper body)?

haha!

col

 
 
 

I've seen it all now

Post by Paul » Fri, 31 Oct 2003 22:10:42

Quote:



> > I can imagine that if I have to... just can't imagine how you could do an
> > action like that on a C2.

> The most out-of-this-world technique I've yet seen went something like this:

> Start at frontstops but with an exaggerated forward body lean.

> Bum-shove without changing the body angle at all, all the way to backstops.

> Draw the handle back, at chin height (elbows out), finishing with a very
> exaggerated backwards body lean.

> Return to frontstops by first bending the legs, then following it with the
> body.

> Repeat at a 1:1 stroke / recovery ratio, rating mid 20s for about 2 minutes.

> It had to be seen to be believed.

> Richard

Hey, they were probably told "Legs, body, arms" and they followed it.
[;o)

Did you mean they bum shoved without moving the handle? Or maybe I
misunderstand the "bum shoving" term.

I often thought that assembling a video documentary titled "The Good,
The Bad, and the Ergly" could be quite fun.

- Paul Smith

 
 
 

I've seen it all now

Post by colmc » Fri, 31 Oct 2003 22:25:01

one thing I forgot to add...this woman somehow managed to .... pauses to
control fits of giggles...still pull the chain with her
arms...while...somehow....moving the rest of her body... forward...

col

 
 
 

I've seen it all now

Post by David Gillar » Fri, 31 Oct 2003 22:44:51

Quote:

> Hey, they were probably told "Legs, body, arms" and they followed it.
> [;o)

They hadn't been coached by Henning's friend, Hans Bodyslide, then?

So bad it's good? No, you're right, I should shut up.

 
 
 

I've seen it all now

Post by Ed » Sat, 01 Nov 2003 00:16:51

The problem with that would be?  I just listened to a rower talk about
thinking palms up at the catch to keep the shoulders from hunching.
What better way to get the "feeling" than to do the actual motion.
Quote:
>Ah but you've forgotten the whole 'hold the handle from underneath for 10
>strokes because that works different muscles (sic)' trick. I love that one.

 
 
 

I've seen it all now

Post by RuftyTuf » Sat, 01 Nov 2003 00:38:38

Quote:


> > Draw the handle back, at chin height (elbows out), finishing with a very
> > exaggerated backwards body lean.

> > Return to frontstops by first bending the legs, then following it with the
> > body.

> > Repeat at a 1:1 stroke / recovery ratio, rating mid 20s for about 2
>  minutes.

Think I know the girl. She has other talents
 
 
 

I've seen it all now

Post by Henry La » Sat, 01 Nov 2003 00:52:22


Quote:
>I often thought that assembling a video documentary titled "The Good,
>The Bad, and the Ergly" could be quite fun.

I'm a bit more humble as of yesterday.  I'm doing an erg in a hotel
with two machines, another guy turns up and starts thrashing away on
the ergo next door.  Early 40s I guess, very moderate technique, 2:00
splits.   We get chatting, he asks me do I want a race - loser buys
beer.   "Fine" I say.  We agree on 2K.  "Something short" he says,
ominously.

Turns out over the beer that *I* bought that he does 30 mins static
bike, 30 mins treadmill run, 20 mins ergo and some weights every day.
Technique is important ... but so is being ***y strong and ***y
fit!

He was from the Netherlands, as it happened.  I told him I could put
him in touch with some rowing clubs that would appreciate him!

 
 
 

I've seen it all now

Post by Hihih » Sat, 01 Nov 2003 05:41:32


Quote:
> one thing I forgot to add...this woman somehow managed to .... pauses to
> control fits of giggles...still pull the chain with her
> arms...while...somehow....moving the rest of her body... forward...

> col

I think I see that more often. They start the recover, but still pull with
their arms. strange...

Higs,

Hihihi

--
To reach me use Hihihi at mail2blonde dot com

 
 
 

I've seen it all now

Post by Paul » Sat, 01 Nov 2003 06:02:27

Quote:

> one thing I forgot to add...this woman somehow managed to .... pauses to
> control fits of giggles...still pull the chain with her
> arms...while...somehow....moving the rest of her body... forward...

> col

Oh, I've seen this, the stick that was being humped was the handle?
Basically no flywheel rotation going on, but a lot of motion around
the handle as if it were nearly fixed in space....

Reminds me of people that get on the Erg and even appear to be rowing,
but at a 3:30 pace, I can't let my legs straighten out under the force
of gravity and go that slowly, it must be a real exercise in
'control'. LOL

- Paul Smith

 
 
 

I've seen it all now

Post by Nick Sues » Sat, 01 Nov 2003 13:24:20


Quote:



> > one thing I forgot to add...this woman somehow managed to .... pauses to
> > control fits of giggles...still pull the chain with her
> > arms...while...somehow....moving the rest of her body... forward...

> > col

> I think I see that more often. They start the recover, but still pull with
> their arms. strange...

Yes, that's what I occasionally see with non-rowers on ergs. The leg
movement and upper body (including arms) movements are almost totally out of
phase, resulting in very little movement of the handle. The body folds
forwards as the legs straighten (ie bum shove) and the arms at the same time
extend. Then the reverse happens.

Trouble is that very few gym instructors have a clue about rowing technique.
A friend in Sydney once told me she had started working out on the erg and
proudly said she was now doing her 2000 metre pieces in under 15 minutes!
She's a quack, so I asked her a medical question. "Has rigor mortis set in?"

Anyway, it transpired she was doing these pieces at ratings in the high 30s
at the instruction of her "personal trainer", and was clearly bucketing up
and down much as described above without the flywheel really going round at
all. Like me she's over 50, and unlike me she's over 100kg (yes a quack
ought to know better about avoiding obesity, but there you are), so the
thought of her wobbling around like that was just a little mind boggling. I
guess that the amplitude of her slide motion was pretty small. I carefully
explained to her the elements of good technique, and to drop the rating to
about 22. Sure enough, she soon got her 2000m down close to 10 mins, and was
delighted, but then she told her "personal trainer" who was furious that I
had dared question his fitness programme for her, and stressed the
importance of that high rating for "good" technique. Proof that you don't
need a lot of knowledge to set yourself up as a personal trainer!