Boats on roof-racks and the Law UK.

Boats on roof-racks and the Law UK.

Post by Mike Wats » Tue, 17 Sep 1996 04:00:00


Hi Folks,

Coming back from the Boston Marathon yesterday afternoon with a double scull on the roof-rack I got stopped by a policeman who was mightily unimpressed with this arrangement. I told him that there was a special dispensation in law for the carriage
of boats allowing a 3 metre overhang rather than the normal 1.8m, he baught this at the time and let me carry on but no doubt will be checking up ! This is not a total
fabrication on my part, I'm sure I've read about this 3 meter limit somewhere. If anyone can can find a reference to this (before I'm hauled before the Beak) I would be grateful.

Thanks,

Mike,

Leicester Rowing Club.

--
                      Mike Watson (Software Engineer)
         Camtec Electronics Ltd. 18 Melton St., Leicester, UK, LE1 3NB
            Phone: +44(0) 116 2537534   FAX: +44(0) 116 2537920

 
 
 

Boats on roof-racks and the Law UK.

Post by Ken Hastie, Tyneside U » Wed, 18 Sep 1996 04:00:00



Quote:
>Hi Folks,

>Coming back from the Boston Marathon yesterday afternoon

I hope you completed the course OK.  I did it once (never again!) in
1975 and this week, my son did it in 2 hours less!!.  He was in the
octuple scull that won the event overall though!  They were chuffed to
bits because they beat the octuple that had most of the GB Junior
scullers from the worlds by 9 minutes.

Quote:
>with a double scull on
>the roof-rack I got stopped by a policeman who was mightily unimpressed with
>this arrangement. I told him that there was a special dispensation in law for
>the carriage
>of boats allowing a 3 metre overhang rather than the normal 1.8m, he baught this
>at the time and let me carry on but no doubt will be checking up

I left this posting for a day or two to see if you got an informed
response.  You haven't got one yet, so here's my two pennyworth. You are
right.  From memory, I believe anyone is allowed a one metre overhang
(used to be three feet until glorius european metrication) providing you
have a brightly coloured tow rag one metre square, or a white light for
front overhang and red light for rear overhang if travelling in
darkness.

'Boats propelled by oars' are allowed a three metre overhang (used to be
ten foot) providing they have the same tow rag, and also inform the
police chief of every county that they are travelling through.  This
last requirement is a bit of a tall order...

I would suggest you contact the ARA who have a really good booklet
covering advice for people who tow boat trailers.  I think it was John
Buchan who put it together, but it is really good, and tells you how to
stay within the law.
Hope this allays your concern.  I doubt very much if you hear any more
from the nice police officers...

When we travelled to the Boston Marathon in 1975 we also attracted the
attention of the police.  We carried a sectioned four in two halves on
two mini vans, and for a laugh we parked at a service station with the
vans parked end to end in such a fashion that the boat looked a one
piece.  It was attracting loads of attention as people wondered how we
could drive one boat on two separate vehicles.  Mr. Plod also turned up,
and got out his car to have a closer inspection, and left scratching his
head.. We watched from the cafe window creasing ourselves ....!
--
Ken Hastie, Tyneside UK

 
 
 

Boats on roof-racks and the Law UK.

Post by Chris Harriso » Wed, 18 Sep 1996 04:00:00

Quote:

> Coming back from the Boston Marathon yesterday afternoon with a double
> scull on the roof-rack I got stopped by a policeman who was mightily
> unimpressed with this arrangement. I told him that there was a special
> dispensation in law for the carriage
> of boats allowing a 3 metre overhang rather than the normal 1.8m, he
> baught this at the time and let me carry on but no doubt will be
> checking up ! This is not a total
> fabrication on my part, I'm sure I've read about this 3 meter limit
> somewhere. If anyone can can find a reference to this (before I'm
> hauled before the Beak) I would be grateful.

Firstly, if you're going to compete in the Boston Marathon then count
yourself lucky they're not sectioning you, just be thankful it's only a
traffic cop!

I haven't an immediate reference to hand, but I'm fairly sure that a
while ago (c. 1.5 - 2 years) there was a piece in Regatta about
transporting boats, written by a traffic policman if memory serves,
which covered all the legal points.

--
chris harrison.
ic-parc, william penney laboratory, imperial college, london, sw7 2bz.
http://www-icparc.doc.ic.ac.uk/~cah1/

 
 
 

Boats on roof-racks and the Law UK.

Post by Mark Rusc » Fri, 20 Sep 1996 04:00:00




: >with a double scull on
: >the roof-rack I got stopped by a policeman who was mightily unimpressed with
: >this arrangement. I told him that there was a special dispensation in law for
: >the carriage
: >of boats allowing a 3 metre overhang rather than the normal 1.8m, he baught this
: >at the time and let me carry on but no doubt will be checking up

: I left this posting for a day or two to see if you got an informed
: response.  You haven't got one yet, so here's my two pennyworth. You are
: right.  From memory, I believe anyone is allowed a one metre overhang
: (used to be three feet until glorius european metrication) providing you
: have a brightly coloured tow rag one metre square, or a white light for
: front overhang and red light for rear overhang if travelling in
: darkness.

: 'Boats propelled by oars' are allowed a three metre overhang (used to be
: ten foot) providing they have the same tow rag, and also inform the
: police chief of every county that they are travelling through.  This
: last requirement is a bit of a tall order...

: I would suggest you contact the ARA who have a really good booklet
: covering advice for people who tow boat trailers.  I think it was John
: Buchan who put it together, but it is really good, and tells you how to
: stay within the law.
: >

The diagram we have on the wall in the club (I guess from the ARA booklet)
list the following for boats propelled by oars:

Projection < 1.0m - OK
Projection 1.0 - 3.05 m - Must be clearly marked so that it is visible from
the front/rear and sides.
Projection > 3.05m - Clearly marked as above and must be arranged with police
as Ken describes.

Mark (Furnivall SC).