Interesting new development for a rowing biomechanics commercial device

Interesting new development for a rowing biomechanics commercial device

Post by thomas.k.car.. » Sat, 02 Mar 2013 19:47:50


Thought I would link this here as well for peoples information, I have recently started using the Rowing in Motion app for iOS which is an application that uses an iPhones GPS and accelerometer to measure how the boat accelerates and decelerates through the stroke and also how fast you are going. I have written about using the app and how I have found it:

http://rowingmusings.wordpress.com/2013/02/09/rowing-in-motion-v2-0-a...

There is also a companion coach app that allows you to link via bluetooth/wifi two iOS devices (i.e. iphone/iPad) so that the coaches device reflects exactly what is being displayed by the athletes app (simiarly to the NK XL3 although the iOS app has the advantage that you can use the iPad's camera to film the rowing) and also an analytics website that you can upload your outing data to afterwards to analyse how the pieces went and things to work on in the future.

What is interesting is that rowing in motion have just announced they have come to an arrangement with OarInspired which is a company looking to bring a wireless gate to the market which can measure the power output of the rower

http://www.rowinginmotion.com/cooperation-with-oarinspired/

So now it looks like in the near future you will be able to buy a product that will be able to measure the power output you apply apply, record how the boat responds to that power output, and all that using wireless technology and a system based around apples easy to use iOS interface. Colour me interested.

 
 
 

Interesting new development for a rowing biomechanics commercial device

Post by Carl » Sat, 02 Mar 2013 20:45:01


Quote:
> Thought I would link this here as well for peoples information, I have recently started using the Rowing in Motion app for iOS which is an application that uses an iPhones GPS and accelerometer to measure how the boat accelerates and decelerates through the stroke and also how fast you are going. I have written about using the app and how I have found it:

> http://rowingmusings.wordpress.com/2013/02/09/rowing-in-motion-v2-0-a...

> There is also a companion coach app that allows you to link via bluetooth/wifi two iOS devices (i.e. iphone/iPad) so that the coaches device reflects exactly what is being displayed by the athletes app (simiarly to the NK XL3 although the iOS app has the advantage that you can use the iPad's camera to film the rowing) and also an analytics website that you can upload your outing data to afterwards to analyse how the pieces went and things to work on in the future.

> What is interesting is that rowing in motion have just announced they have come to an arrangement with OarInspired which is a company looking to bring a wireless gate to the market which can measure the power output of the rower

> http://www.rowinginmotion.com/cooperation-with-oarinspired/

> So now it looks like in the near future you will be able to buy a product that will be able to measure the power output you apply apply, record how the boat responds to that power output, and all that using wireless technology and a system based around apples easy to use iOS interface. Colour me interested.

Just a small techno-quibble:

I'd suppose what'd be measured would be force at the gate, not power?
Force profile is important, especially in getting crews to row together
& in developing techniques to concentrate the application of force into
those parts of the stroke whose propulsive efficiency may be greater
but, unless appropriately combined with a relevant speed, cannot give
you the power.  Also, the force at the gate is also not the force which
actually moves the boat.

Looks like a handy piece of kit.

Cheers -
Carl

--
Carl Douglas Racing Shells        -
     Fine Small-Boats/AeRoWing Low-drag Riggers/Advanced Accessories
Write:   Harris Boatyard, Laleham Reach, Chertsey KT16 8RP, UK
Find:    tinyurl.com/2tqujf



 
 
 

Interesting new development for a rowing biomechanics commercial device

Post by thomas.k.car.. » Sat, 02 Mar 2013 21:08:13

Quote:



Ah yes Carl, my mistake, it is force that it is measuring at the gate not power.

Boat speed in the app I use is currently measured using the iPhones GPS, although the full OarInspired system shows an impeller which would be a much better solution for me as it means less of an affect of the stream on the recorded boat speed

 
 
 

Interesting new development for a rowing biomechanics commercial device

Post by Carl » Sat, 02 Mar 2013 21:46:10


What is interesting is that rowing in motion have just announced they have come to an arrangement with OarInspired which is a company looking to bring a wireless gate to the market which can measure the power output of the rower > > http://www.rowinginmotion.com/cooperation-with-oarinspired/ > > So now it looks like in the near future you will be able to buy a product that will be able to measure the power output you apply apply, record how the boat responds to that power output, and all that using wireless technology and a system based around apples easy to use iOS interface. Colour me interested. > Just a small techno-quibble: I'd suppose what'd be measured would be force at the gate, not power? Force profile is important, especially in getting crews to row together & in developing techniques to concentrate the application of force into those parts of the stroke whose propulsive efficiency may be greater but, unless appropriately combined with a relevant speed, cannot give you the

Quote:

> Ah yes Carl, my mistake, it is force that it is measuring at the gate not power.

> Boat speed in the app I use is currently measured using the iPhones GPS, although the full OarInspired system shows an impeller which would be a much better solution for me as it means less of an affect of the stream on the recorded boat speed

Apologies for the pedantry, Tom :)  Just best to get things right.

In relation to which, I've been asked a pile of questions of this kind
as a result of the gibberish with which some who offer forward wing
riggers seek to justify that particular design.

In particular, unscrupulous & technically illiterate vendors of such
devices tend to spout on their websites about the "power passing in the
right direction down the rigger stay".

All that stuff like that tells any even half-competent engineer is that
its author was either a fool or a knave.

However, the broad majority of rowers have non-technical backgrounds, so
to them such nonsense can sound highly plausible.  They are the intended
targets of this plausible lie.

For the avoidance of doubt:
All that is transmitted to the boat by any rigger arrangement is force.
  Not power, not work.  The path taken by that force, & whether it
conveyed by tension or compression, is entirely irrelevant - unless
elements within that path measurably change their length or form under
the applied loads.  Otherwise no power or work passes through any
well-made rigger.  And no power or work is lost.

That said, the longer you make a rigger stay, the more flexible it must
be.  It's end-on (push-pull) flexibility will probably be so slight as
to be irrelevant, but its flexural (bending) & torsional (twisting)
instability is _very_ dependent on the length of the stay or stays
concerned.  In particular, a structure which is a simple cantilever
(e.g. an oar or a single-stay rigger) is inherently very much less rigid
than a structure which is properly triangulated (a conventional 2-stay
rigger forms 2 sides of a triangle, the boat forming the 3rd side).

It's OK - we row for fun.  If we buy something because we like its
looks, that's fine.  But it is never OK to sell stuff on a dishonest
prospectus - as snake oil used to be sold as a cure-all.  And it is
deeply disappointing that, in our clean and open sport, so much snake
oil is still being sold.

Cheers -
Carl

--
Carl Douglas Racing Shells        -
     Fine Small-Boats/AeRoWing Low-drag Riggers/Advanced Accessories
Write:   Harris Boatyard, Laleham Reach, Chertsey KT16 8RP, UK
Find:    tinyurl.com/2tqujf