Question on boating crews in larger boats

Question on boating crews in larger boats

Post by Ed » Fri, 25 Aug 2000 04:00:00


I have a question on placing smaller crews (individuals) in larger
weight class boats.  Is it an advantage or disadvantage to boat
(singles and doubles) people in boats in larger (higher weight class)
shells.

 I have observed that when we place rowers  in the appropriate weight
class small boats (lightweights in lightweight boats) that the sterns
and the bows of these shells naturally dip at the catch and finish
positions.  I have also seen that when an undersized crew (my example
is a heavy women's double (160 lb average) ) were placed in a larger
weight class hull (heavyweight men's shell) there was a better weight
distribution and the bow and stern tended to ride level.  I lurk in
this group on a daily basis and I seem to remember Carl making a
statement that a crew is better off in a shell that matches  their
weight, but I am also of the understand that the dipping of the bow
and stern were detrimental to boat speed (isn't this the advantage
that a bowloader gives a crew).  Since the overall weight of a
heavyweight and midweight boat are approximately independent of the
weight class of the hull, would it not be advantageous to boat a crew
in a slightly larger shell.

Thanks
Ed

P.S.  I have been watching the CII adjustable oar discussion.  We have
three sets of adjustable Dreher Sculls.  I don't have Braca oars, but
if the are similar to the Drehers, I would prefer them.  I have seen
people adjusting the CII's and I have adjust our sculls several times
to suit individual scullers.  The Drehers are quicker to adjust
(loosen screw, adjust length, tighten screw) and so far, they have
been shown to be quite durable (the oars are 2-3 years old, used
heavily, and zero repairs).  I liked the sculls so much, our  program
has purchased 10 of the adjustable Apex oars.

 
 
 

Question on boating crews in larger boats

Post by Joe Tyn » Sat, 26 Aug 2000 04:00:00

Quote:

>I have a question on placing smaller crews (individuals) in larger
>weight class boats.  Is it an advantage or disadvantage to boat
>(singles and doubles) people in boats in larger (higher weight class)
>shells.

> I have observed that when we place rowers  in the appropriate weight
>class small boats (lightweights in lightweight boats) that the sterns
>and the bows of these shells naturally dip at the catch and finish
>positions.  I have also seen that when an undersized crew (my example
>is a heavy women's double (160 lb average) ) were placed in a larger
>weight class hull (heavyweight men's shell) there was a better weight
>distribution and the bow and stern tended to ride level.  I lurk in
>this group on a daily basis and I seem to remember Carl making a
>statement that a crew is better off in a shell that matches  their
>weight, but I am also of the understand that the dipping of the bow
>and stern were detrimental to boat speed (isn't this the advantage
>that a bowloader gives a crew).  Since the overall weight of a
>heavyweight and midweight boat are approximately independent of the
>weight class of the hull, would it not be advantageous to boat a crew
>in a slightly larger shell.

>Thanks
>Ed

>P.S.  I have been watching the CII adjustable oar discussion.  We have
>three sets of adjustable Dreher Sculls.  I don't have Braca oars, but
>if the are similar to the Drehers, I would prefer them.  I have seen
>people adjusting the CII's and I have adjust our sculls several times
>to suit individual scullers.  The Drehers are quicker to adjust
>(loosen screw, adjust length, tighten screw) and so far, they have
>been shown to be quite durable (the oars are 2-3 years old, used
>heavily, and zero repairs).  I liked the sculls so much, our  program
>has purchased 10 of the adjustable Apex oars.

I think that it would be best for a crew to row a boat the is made for
their size. An example:

In our boathouse is a women's 8 that is a one-of-a-kind boat, in that
it is made for women who are about 5'4, since at the time this boat
was raced, most of the women that rowed out of our boathouse were not
what most rowers would consier competition material.  This 8 is about
6 feet shorter than your regular women's 8. It has won so many races
that it has been retired.  This shows what advantages a boat that is
fitted for the crew that rows it holds, instead of rowing a boat that
is too large. True, the bow and stern don't dip on a larger boat with
a smaller crew, but that is cancelled out by the additional weight,
surface area, and rigging issues that the smaller crew has to deal
with.

Joe

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Question on boating crews in larger boats

Post by Ed » Wed, 30 Aug 2000 04:00:00

....snip...

Quote:

>I think that it would be best for a crew to row a boat the is made for
>their size. An example:

>In our boathouse is a women's 8 that is a one-of-a-kind boat, in that
>it is made for women who are about 5'4, since at the time this boat
>was raced, most of the women that rowed out of our boathouse were not
>what most rowers would consier competition material.  This 8 is about
>6 feet shorter than your regular women's 8. It has won so many races
>that it has been retired.  This shows what advantages a boat that is
>fitted for the crew that rows it holds, instead of rowing a boat that
>is too large. True, the bow and stern don't dip on a larger boat with
>a smaller crew, but that is cancelled out by the additional weight,
>surface area, and rigging issues that the smaller crew has to deal
>with.

>Joe

Joe:

With the FISA weight limits it doesn't really matter what weight class
the shell is, they are all generally the same weight (within 1-2 lbs).
The truth is that alot of lower weight class boats are the heavier
class boats just with the center of gravity lowered in the shell. The
question really boils down to wetted surface vs.  bow-stern dip.  I
like to rig my crews high, so the rigging issues actually come into
play when their average weight is on the upper end of the shell's
weight class.

Ed

 
 
 

Question on boating crews in larger boats

Post by Maarten Heckma » Thu, 31 Aug 2000 04:00:00

snip...

Quote:

> With the FISA weight limits it doesn't really matter what weight class
> the shell is, they are all generally the same weight (within 1-2 lbs).
> The truth is that alot of lower weight class boats are the heavier
> class boats just with the center of gravity lowered in the shell. The
> question really boils down to wetted surface vs.  bow-stern dip.  I
> like to rig my crews high, so the rigging issues actually come into
> play when their average weight is on the upper end of the shell's
> weight class.

> Ed

I agree, there is one other thing involved: balance. If the crew is lighter
than the design weight of the boat, you will be higher above the water and
balance can be (a lot) more difficult.

Maarten

 
 
 

Question on boating crews in larger boats

Post by Ed » Fri, 01 Sep 2000 22:46:59

Maarten:

You have me on the balance issue.  I am assuming that the crew is able
to balance the shell.

Ed  

Quote:

>I agree, there is one other thing involved: balance. If the crew is lighter
>than the design weight of the boat, you will be higher above the water and
>balance can be (a lot) more difficult.

>Maarten