pricing a shell

pricing a shell

Post by JDwyer98 » Wed, 06 Mar 1996 04:00:00


Shells - Especially singles do not deprecaite as a car does.  Usually the
price of a new boat is increased each year and therefore your single will
hold it's value.  Also if you cannot wait on a list for one to be built
and you need one NOW then you will pay accordingly.  I usually buy a new
boat every 2 to 3 years and sell it for at least what I paid for it.  Then
buying the new boat costs $500-1000 more!

Jim Dwyer

 
 
 

pricing a shell

Post by Row » Wed, 06 Mar 1996 04:00:00

I think it's just simply supply and demand. They charge that much because
people pay that much. If I cant sell something for $4000.00, then my price
will come down, but if it sells, then there is no problem.
Brad

 
 
 

pricing a shell

Post by william bee » Thu, 07 Mar 1996 04:00:00

        It would seem to me that shells should depreciate at about the
same rate as other boats (I'm thinking of a 30 foot sailboat,
specifically).  When one buys the boat brand new, it is instantly
depreciated about 30% (my figures could be off by a few percent).
Then, if kept in good condition, it slowly gains back the lost 30% due
to inflation.  So, depending on the type of shell, the blades, and
other extras such as a stroke coach (especially if the boat comes with
decent blades), it seems to me that a three year old shell kept in
'like new' condition would sell for close to a thousand dollars less
than a brand new shell (once again depending on how much it cost
originally).  I could be way off here, since I'm not majoring in
economics.  At anyrate, it is true that a boat stored correctly for five
years will come out just as competitive as it went in, and will still
appear new.  Just my thoughts.

William V. Beery '98
Skidmore Crew
Skidmore College
Saratoga Springs, NY 12866-1632