Junior rowers diet

Junior rowers diet

Post by Bird » Fri, 22 Mar 2002 04:40:12


Perhaps this is the wrong forum but I would like to know the typical diet
for the athlete who is in training for crew.  I am asking out of concern for
my 17 year old son who is 6'2" and weighs 160 lb.  To be at top performance
I think he needs a more substantial diet, high in protein since he is still
building muscle.

His typical diet is a bowl of cereal and fruit with a piece of toast in the
morning.  He isn't big on eggs.
Lunch consists of a deli sandwich, chips and fruit for lunch
A typical dinner might be pasta with a salad and bread.  I always add
protein into the evening meal with some form of meat.
He is usually too busy to do much snacking in between meals but after a full
day of school and then several hours on the water x 7, there isn't much fuel
left for growth or performance, IMHO.

Any suggestions would be appreciated.

 
 
 

Junior rowers diet

Post by Neil Wallac » Fri, 22 Mar 2002 02:48:20


Quote:
> Perhaps this is the wrong forum but I would like to know the typical diet
> for the athlete who is in training for crew.  I am asking out of concern
for
> my 17 year old son who is 6'2" and weighs 160 lb.  To be at top
performance
> I think he needs a more substantial diet, high in protein since he is
still
> building muscle.

> His typical diet is a bowl of cereal and fruit with a piece of toast in
the
> morning.  He isn't big on eggs.
> Lunch consists of a deli sandwich, chips and fruit for lunch
> A typical dinner might be pasta with a salad and bread.  I always add
> protein into the evening meal with some form of meat.
> He is usually too busy to do much snacking in between meals but after a
full
> day of school and then several hours on the water x 7, there isn't much
fuel
> left for growth or performance, IMHO.

> Any suggestions would be appreciated.

That sounds like a pretty good diet to me.

Have you ever calculated the calorie intake in all that, and broken it down
a bit to ascertain the "quality" of those calories.
 A "deli- sandwich" with chips could easily be well over 1800Kcals. quite a
meal.

What is his fluid intake?

Oh and not snacking between meals is great from a dental perspective at
least. My hobby horse that one.

regards

Neil

 
 
 

Junior rowers diet

Post by Bird » Fri, 22 Mar 2002 06:28:36

I guess I over-stated the deli sandwich.  Really just 2 slices of white
bread with a couple ounces of deli meat.  Maybe 350 cal worth.

His fluid of choice is water!  Not much milk and probably 8 glasses per day
of water.  For a kid his age and with his activity level, I want to ensure
his calorie intake is high enough to fuel growth as well as performance.

Thanks, kk

Quote:



> > Perhaps this is the wrong forum but I would like to know the typical
diet
> > for the athlete who is in training for crew.  I am asking out of concern
> for
> > my 17 year old son who is 6'2" and weighs 160 lb.  To be at top
> performance
> > I think he needs a more substantial diet, high in protein since he is
> still
> > building muscle.

> > His typical diet is a bowl of cereal and fruit with a piece of toast in
> the
> > morning.  He isn't big on eggs.
> > Lunch consists of a deli sandwich, chips and fruit for lunch
> > A typical dinner might be pasta with a salad and bread.  I always add
> > protein into the evening meal with some form of meat.
> > He is usually too busy to do much snacking in between meals but after a
> full
> > day of school and then several hours on the water x 7, there isn't much
> fuel
> > left for growth or performance, IMHO.

> > Any suggestions would be appreciated.

> That sounds like a pretty good diet to me.

> Have you ever calculated the calorie intake in all that, and broken it
down
> a bit to ascertain the "quality" of those calories.
>  A "deli- sandwich" with chips could easily be well over 1800Kcals. quite
a
> meal.

> What is his fluid intake?

> Oh and not snacking between meals is great from a dental perspective at
> least. My hobby horse that one.

> regards

> Neil


 
 
 

Junior rowers diet

Post by Robin Walke » Fri, 22 Mar 2002 04:54:07

My 15 year old son is similar in height, but weighs 91Kg, which I think is
nearly 200lbs. People often ask us what we feed him, and the answer is
'everything, all the time'. He trains between 8 and 11 sessions per week,
depending on training cycle. He is naturally big, but a typical day might
be:

Pre-breakfast - yogourt or fruit desert plus 1/2 litre of Ribena
10k water outing or ergo
Breakfast of ham and cheese sandwich plus banana, more Ribena
Lunch - 2 sandwiches, cake, fruit, crisps, juice
PM training -  water or ergo and/or weights
Tea snack - cake, yesterday's leftovers, whatever he can find in the fridge
Homework
Dinner - whatever we eat, but twice as much - usually protein and veg with
rice, pasta or potato. desert is usually fruit yogourt, mousse or fruit
He also usually has something to eat before he goes to bed.

The above is probably a nutritionists nightmare, but he is doing Ok - 6.19.6
for a 2k ergo, and still growing.

For the nutritionist's viewpoint, I recommend the following website:
www.diet-coaching.com

Best regards

Robin Walker

 
 
 

Junior rowers diet

Post by Bird » Fri, 22 Mar 2002 08:04:39

Thank you so much Robin for the tips.  They grow them big where you live!
I love the pre breakfast idea of yogurt.  I will also try the ham and cheese
for breakfast.  that is doable and would up the protein.  Also, thanks for
the link.
kk

Quote:
> My 15 year old son is similar in height, but weighs 91Kg, which I think is
> nearly 200lbs. People often ask us what we feed him, and the answer is
> 'everything, all the time'. He trains between 8 and 11 sessions per week,
> depending on training cycle. He is naturally big, but a typical day might
> be:

> Pre-breakfast - yogourt or fruit desert plus 1/2 litre of Ribena
> 10k water outing or ergo
> Breakfast of ham and cheese sandwich plus banana, more Ribena
> Lunch - 2 sandwiches, cake, fruit, crisps, juice
> PM training -  water or ergo and/or weights
> Tea snack - cake, yesterday's leftovers, whatever he can find in the
fridge
> Homework
> Dinner - whatever we eat, but twice as much - usually protein and veg with
> rice, pasta or potato. desert is usually fruit yogourt, mousse or fruit
> He also usually has something to eat before he goes to bed.

> The above is probably a nutritionists nightmare, but he is doing Ok -
6.19.6
> for a 2k ergo, and still growing.

> For the nutritionist's viewpoint, I recommend the following website:
> www.diet-coaching.com

> Best regards

> Robin Walker

 
 
 

Junior rowers diet

Post by Walter Martindal » Fri, 22 Mar 2002 05:49:35

6'2" and 72.5 kg is pretty light.  If he grows taller and eats more, he could
get to be a big fellow.
Most athletes, training during growing time, are on a "see-food" diet.  They see
food, and eat it.
Most athletes, indeed most humans, do just fine on 2-3 'servings' of 'meat or
meat substitutes' a day.  A 'serving' is a piece of meat about the size of a
deck of cards.

If you're in the U.S., there's some kind of food triangle or pyramid put out by
the gov't - essentially what you do for an athlete is double or triple the
sources of carbohydrate (starchy stuff, fruit, vegetables) and leave the
meat/dairy alone.  this applies for the "Canada Food Guide" as well.  The human
body makes use of the amino acids in breads, pastas, spuds, beans, peas, and
meats in combined meals to make protein in the muscles, and it makes use of the
vitamins and minerals and other goodies in the fruits, veggies, and all the rest
of it to make all of the body work properly - build bone, muscle, tendon, nerve,
***, and so on.  It's pretty smart.  The big thing is to keep enough calories
(kiloJoules) of energy coming in, mainly from carbohydrate sources.  If the body
doesn't have enough carbohydrate to train and to recover from training, it
starts using up it's own protein sources to make carbohydrate for the exercise.

"see food diet".
Rowing Canada's sport science consultant says that athletes in training can't
afford to just drink water - some form of sports drink or other carbo snack is
needed before,  DURING, after, and between training to keep energy levels high
enough so that a) the training can be done hard enough to get a benefit.  b) the
training can be done for a long enough time at the required intensity to get the
benefit, and c) the person can recover from the training without metabolizing
muscle and bone to replace the energy.

High carbohydrate diets allow better recovery from training, so that the next
training session can be valuable.  Diets that have the same amount of energy,
but provided by fat allow slower recovery from training, and declining
performance (hence declining training effects) as the training week progresses.
While your son's teeth may struggle a bit if he snacks through the day, that's a
better way to keep the energy levels even than to have surges caused by the big
stomach load (although if he's on a 'see food' diet, he'll have those too) - he
can also carry a toothbrush in his book bag if that's necessary.

Oops - look at the time, better get back at work.
Walter

Quote:

> Perhaps this is the wrong forum but I would like to know the typical diet
> for the athlete who is in training for crew.  I am asking out of concern for
> my 17 year old son who is 6'2" and weighs 160 lb.  To be at top performance
> I think he needs a more substantial diet, high in protein since he is still
> building muscle.

> His typical diet is a bowl of cereal and fruit with a piece of toast in the
> morning.  He isn't big on eggs.
> Lunch consists of a deli sandwich, chips and fruit for lunch
> A typical dinner might be pasta with a salad and bread.  I always add
> protein into the evening meal with some form of meat.
> He is usually too busy to do much snacking in between meals but after a full
> day of school and then several hours on the water x 7, there isn't much fuel
> left for growth or performance, IMHO.

> Any suggestions would be appreciated.

 
 
 

Junior rowers diet

Post by Lin DeNoy » Fri, 22 Mar 2002 12:36:34

Quote:
>Lunch consists of a deli sandwich, chips and fruit for lunch
>Any suggestions would be appreciated.

I would start by fixing that lunch.  When my last rower was a junior

were usually whole grain bread, filled with cooked veggies (i.e. grilled
red peppers, grilled eggplant, cold green beans, or whatever I had for
leftovers, plus sometimes a chicken or tuna.  Then yoghurt and fruit.
Since my rower left at 5:30AM for some early AM training, this meant getting
up early for me.  (I still value those precious AM moments together).
Also, my rower liked not having to waste time in the school lunch line.

Do you think your rower will accept packed lunches?  

Sincerely,
Rowers' Mom

 
 
 

Junior rowers diet

Post by Rob Colling » Fri, 22 Mar 2002 19:49:05

Quote:

> I guess I over-stated the deli sandwich.  Really just 2 slices of white
> bread with a couple ounces of deli meat.  Maybe 350 cal worth.

> His fluid of choice is water!  Not much milk and probably 8 glasses per day
> of water.

I'd get that up into litres. At least 2 but 5 is nice!

Rob.

 
 
 

Junior rowers diet

Post by Stuart Jone » Sun, 24 Mar 2002 09:19:11


Quote:
> My 15 year old son weighs 91Kg
> he is doing Ok - 6.19.6
> for a 2k ergo, and still growing.

Shall we expect to see him in the Worlds/Olympics one day then!!?!?  I
didn't hit 91kg until I was 18, (am 110kg now), and *still* haven't hit
6:19.6!!!  Then again I've only been training for about 14 months, being
previously a couch potato!  Sounds like a good diet anyway, and one that I
*will* acquire the willpower to stick to something similar - so much harder
when you're in catered Uni accommodation though...  I'd rather eat soil
somedays than the stuff they produce ;-)

Wish him my luck anyway - the British Record for J18 2km, held by a guy who
was at my local club, is 5:59.0, so your son looks as though he could be
well on target for that anyway!  Incidentally, he's also the reigning Junior
World Champion in a 1x...  Oh how miffed I am that I didn't learn to row
until I was 18...

Stu

 
 
 

Junior rowers diet

Post by Walter Martindal » Sun, 24 Mar 2002 15:19:36

Quote:
>  Incidentally, he's also the reigning Junior
> World Champion in a 1x...  Oh how miffed I am that I didn't learn to row
> until I was 18...

> Stu

Relax Stu.  I know a few people with more than one O****ic gold medal who
started rowing at university (One with 2 gold medals started at 19)
Train,
train,
be patient
train some more,
train smart,
and make SURE your blade-seat timing at the catch, and the start of the drive
are efficient.
Walter
 
 
 

Junior rowers diet

Post by Walter Martindal » Sun, 24 Mar 2002 15:20:20

Quote:

> >  Incidentally, he's also the reigning Junior
> > World Champion in a 1x...  Oh how miffed I am that I didn't learn to row
> > until I was 18...

> > Stu

> Relax Stu.  I know a few people with more than one O****ic gold medal who
> started rowing at university (One with 2 gold medals started at 19)
> Train,
> train,
> be patient
> train some more,
> train smart,
> and make SURE your blade-seat timing at the catch, and the start of the drive
> are efficient.
> Walter

Oops, it's actually 3 gold medals.
 
 
 

Junior rowers diet

Post by Stuart Jone » Tue, 26 Mar 2002 07:46:05


Quote:

> > Relax Stu.  I know a few people with more than one O****ic gold medal
who
> > started rowing at university (One with 2 gold medals started at 19)

True, but still frustrating given that my school had a boathouse, yet I was
never encouraged to go along...  The Games Teacher at school told me when I
was 14 that I was the laziest most useless person he'd ever come across and
that I'd never be good at anything (this was mainly to do with my inability
to play football - he used to be a professional footballer, and my lack of
desire to play rugby or generally run anywhere - it made my knees hurt!)

Quote:
> > Train,
> > train,

Did 74km on the water training last week, and HORR in London...

Quote:
> > be patient

Umm, that's probably my problem ;-)

Quote:
> > train some more,
> > train smart,

Am working on it.  90min UT2 ergs here I come...

Quote:
> > and make SURE your blade-seat timing at the catch, and the start of the
drive
> > are efficient.

Again, practice makes perfect.  Just need to keep practicing...

Quote:
> > Walter

Cheers Walter :-)

Quote:

> Oops, it's actually 3 gold medals.

3, 2, same difference :-P  I'd be ecstatic with an appearance in the
Ol***ics as it stands!!
 
 
 

Junior rowers diet

Post by Robin Walke » Wed, 27 Mar 2002 06:31:34


little snippage.

Quote:

> Shall we expect to see him in the Worlds/Olympics one day then!!?!?  I
> didn't hit 91kg until I was 18, (am 110kg now), and *still* haven't hit
> 6:19.6!!!

Thanks for your kind comments Stuart - Andrew is doing fine so far - just
got back from a good weekend at GB Junior Spring assessments, which went
well

Quote:

> Wish him my luck anyway - the British Record for J18 2km, held by a guy
who
> was at my local club, is 5:59.0,

He knows he stiill has a long way to go to match Mr Langridge, but that
won't stop him trying.

I would echo Walter's comments that you don't need to be an outstanding
junior to be successful at senior level - the ***, sweat and tears can
start whenever you want, and if you are at Northwich, you have some
excellent water and good coaches. Keep up the good work!

Best regards

Robin