origin: "weigh enough"

origin: "weigh enough"

Post by Arthur Pearc » Sun, 13 Oct 1996 04:00:00


Does anyone have any information about the origins of this term? Is this
how it is written?

Thank you.

SP

 
 
 

origin: "weigh enough"

Post by Hcrun » Tue, 15 Oct 1996 04:00:00

I've always understood it to be "way enough"--"way" in the sense of
forward progress, as in "to get under way" or "to have steerage way"
(i.e., to have sufficient speed through the water to make the rudder
effective for steering).

Howard Runyon
Chicago

 
 
 

origin: "weigh enough"

Post by R. Hughe » Tue, 15 Oct 1996 04:00:00


Quote:
> I've always understood it to be "way enough"--"way" in the sense of
> forward progress, as in "to get under way" or "to have steerage way"
> (i.e., to have sufficient speed through the water to make the rudder
> effective for steering).

> Howard Runyon
> Chicago

   YEah, I agree

Bobby Hughes, UW crew, WA

 
 
 

origin: "weigh enough"

Post by David McW » Tue, 15 Oct 1996 04:00:00

: Does anyone have any information about the origins of this term? Is this
: how it is written?

I have rowed in the UK (Northern Ireland) and in New Zealand and I never heard
this term until I started reading this newsgroup. Is it peculiar to North
America? We have always used the call "Easy all" which I have taken to mean
the same thing from the context. Of course I could have it all wrong.

David
--

WarpEngine Group,       |  
Computer Science,       |  "Flash, I love you! But we only
University of Waikato   |   have 14 hours to save the Earth!!"

 
 
 

origin: "weigh enough"

Post by R » Wed, 16 Oct 1996 04:00:00


Quote:



>> : Does anyone have any information about the origins of this term? Is this
>> : how it is written?

>> I have rowed in the UK (Northern Ireland) and in New Zealand and I never heard
>> this term until I started reading this newsgroup. Is it peculiar to North
>> America? We have always used the call "Easy all" which I have taken to mean
>> the same thing from the context. Of course I could have it all wrong.

>Where I row, "easy all" means row lightly or "on the paddle", but it
>doesn't mean stop everything as "way 'nough" does.

>Bobby Hughes

>U.W. Crew, Seattle, WA

 
 
 

origin: "weigh enough"

Post by Walter Martinda » Wed, 16 Oct 1996 04:00:00


Quote:





>>> : Does anyone have any information about the origins of this term? Is this
>>> : how it is written?

>>> I have rowed in the UK (Northern Ireland) and in New Zealand and I never heard
>>> this term until I started reading this newsgroup. Is it peculiar to North
>>> America? We have always used the call "Easy all" which I have taken to mean
>>> the same thing from the context. Of course I could have it all wrong.

>>Where I row, "easy all" means row lightly or "on the paddle", but it
>>doesn't mean stop everything as "way 'nough" does.

>>Bobby Hughes

>>U.W. Crew, Seattle, WA

At the various places I've rowed and coached in Canada, "Easy All" and
"Let 'er Run" have been used for "stop rowing".  Some places have used
"Let 'er Run" to imply stop rowing with the blades up and feathered for
a while, followed by "Blades Down" for resting prior to turning around or
in between bits of work.

"Way Enough" at first sounded like "way 'n up" when racing in Seattle or
San Diego, and on reflection sounds more like a comment than a command.
(i.e., "alright guys, we've gone far enough," as opposed to "stop rowing
and LET the boat (her) RUN out.")

Whatever, as long as everyone in the crew knows what each phrase or command
means, I suppose you could say "Garage" to tell the crew to stop rowing.

And then there are other languages... What is it in French? German?
Japanese? etc...
Walter

 
 
 

origin: "weigh enough"

Post by Richard D. Lew » Wed, 16 Oct 1996 04:00:00

Some Dude wrote a nice column about this very
subject in the last issue of US Rowing.  After
reading the article, (not in real close detail)
it appears the orig. of the term is not real
clear but has been used for some time.  The
author probably would like anyone knowing the
answer to drop him a line.  Good material
for yet another column.  

 
 
 

origin: "weigh enough"

Post by David Prat » Wed, 16 Oct 1996 04:00:00

I have to add my vote to a previous respondent to this thread ... this
from one (me) who rowed at Washington, coached at Navy, and am presently
rowing Masters' with the Ancient Mariners Rowing Club in Seattle.

I have always taken the command "Way Enough" (actually sounds like "Way
'Nuff") to mean "there is enough way on the boat ... stop adding to it."
This is using the term "way" in the nautical sense, as in "let's get under
way" etc.

David T. Pratt
Professor of Mechanical Engineering
University of Washington


Quote:





> >>> : Does anyone have any information about the origins of this term? Is this
> >>> : how it is written?

> >>> I have rowed in the UK (Northern Ireland) and in New Zealand and I never heard
> >>> this term until I started reading this newsgroup. Is it peculiar to North
> >>> America? We have always used the call "Easy all" which I have taken to mean
> >>> the same thing from the context. Of course I could have it all wrong.

> >>Where I row, "easy all" means row lightly or "on the paddle", but it
> >>doesn't mean stop everything as "way 'nough" does.

> >>Bobby Hughes

> >>U.W. Crew, Seattle, WA

> At the various places I've rowed and coached in Canada, "Easy All" and
> "Let 'er Run" have been used for "stop rowing".  Some places have used
> "Let 'er Run" to imply stop rowing with the blades up and feathered for
> a while, followed by "Blades Down" for resting prior to turning around or
> in between bits of work.

> "Way Enough" at first sounded like "way 'n up" when racing in Seattle or
> San Diego, and on reflection sounds more like a comment than a command.
> (i.e., "alright guys, we've gone far enough," as opposed to "stop rowing
> and LET the boat (her) RUN out.")

> Whatever, as long as everyone in the crew knows what each phrase or command
> means, I suppose you could say "Garage" to tell the crew to stop rowing.

> And then there are other languages... What is it in French? German?
> Japanese? etc...
> Walter

 
 
 

origin: "weigh enough"

Post by BBReynol » Wed, 16 Oct 1996 04:00:00

I'd go for "weigh enough" as a follow-on for "weigh haul away, we'll haul
away together" as a singing cadance on the anchor capstan while "weighing
the anchor"...to stop the sailors, a "weigh enough" ...leads to "away
enough"...leads to "way enough": and for the non-English speakers that's
the "ough" pronounced "uff", not the one pronounced "oh", as in
"thorough", or "oow", as in "through".

Bruce B. Reynolds, Systems Consultant: Founder of Trailing Edge
Technologies---Sweeping Up Behind Data Processing Dinosaurs

 
 
 

origin: "weigh enough"

Post by Andrew Brk » Wed, 16 Oct 1996 04:00:00

: Does anyone have any information about the origins of this term? Is this
: how it is written?

: Thank you.

: SP

what people are trying to say is really "away and up", but it has been
slurred over the years!

Andrew

 
 
 

origin: "weigh enough"

Post by LeeAnn Tzen » Wed, 16 Oct 1996 04:00:00

Quote:
> Does anyone have any information about the origins of this term? Is
> this how it is written?

The term "weigh enough" is investigated in the "Ask Dr. Rowing" column
of the American Rowing magazine (I think it is the April/May 1996
issue).

In the historical sense, "weigh" is more or less synonymous with "way",
and it does in fact mean something along the lines of "to get under
way".

Dr. Rowing didn't have an explanation for the attachment of the term
"enough" to that, but I believe it is a similar construction to the
phrase "good enough", which indicates sufficiency of goodness (for an
arcane interpretation of the language...).

If you look at the term "weigh enough" as meaning "sufficient weigh" or
"sufficient way", then it makes sense.  When we respond to "weigh
enough", we stop rowing and let the boat run.  Take then the idea that
the crew has applied sufficient weigh, and there you have "weigh enough"
to stop rowing.

The last two paragraphs are speculation on my part, combined with a bit
of study into earlier forms of English.  If someone has better
information, I would love to know more authoritatively about this
myself.

--LeeAnn Tzeng

 
 
 

origin: "weigh enough"

Post by car.. » Thu, 17 Oct 1996 04:00:00

Quote:

>>> I have rowed in the UK (Northern Ireland) and in New Zealand and I never heard
>>> this term until I started reading this newsgroup. Is it peculiar to North
>>> America? We have always used the call "Easy all" which I have taken to mean
>>> the same thing from the context. Of course I could have it all wrong.

>>Where I row, "easy all" means row lightly or "on the paddle", but it
>>doesn't mean stop everything as "way 'nough" does.

I row in the south east US and I've always heard "way 'nough" but I've
also heard of crews saying "ease the oars."


 
 
 

origin: "weigh enough"

Post by Richard D. Lew » Fri, 18 Oct 1996 04:00:00

The term "weigh in" is method used to replace or patch
a wooden member(s) in a hull. Espically  used if
the hull has a small puncture from hitting a pile or
rock and only short pieces of wood are cut away and
replaced.  This was term generally means that
the step has been completed where the cut wooden
pieces have been cut, fitted, and glued in, but the
patching process is not necessary complete. So maybe
weigh enough comes from weigh in, like to halt a leak,

 
 
 

origin: "weigh enough"

Post by Andrew Brk » Mon, 21 Oct 1996 04:00:00

The term "way enough", or your favorite variation of this, has been used
to stop boats from rowing as well as to stop boats while the rowers are
carrying them on their shoulders.  This is not what was origonally
intended at all!  In fact, it originated from the command "away and up".
Whether this meant hands away, and up, or hands away, and blades up, i
just don't know. The point is that there really is no command "weigh
enough".

My hypothesis is that over the years "away and up" evolved into
"way n'up" and then through a bad game of telephone into "weigh enough"!

Andrew  

 
 
 

origin: "weigh enough"

Post by David Prat » Fri, 25 Oct 1996 04:00:00

Sorry, Andrew, plausible theory, but the term "way (or weigh) enough" was
in use long before there were telephones!  It does, and has always, I
believe (I was not actually there at the beginning) mean simply "there is
enough way/weigh on the boat, stop adding to it."

David T. Pratt
Professor of Mechanical Engineering
University of Washington


Quote:

> The term "way enough", or your favorite variation of this, has been used
> to stop boats from rowing as well as to stop boats while the rowers are
> carrying them on their shoulders.  This is not what was origonally
> intended at all!  In fact, it originated from the command "away and up".
> Whether this meant hands away, and up, or hands away, and blades up, i
> just don't know. The point is that there really is no command "weigh
> enough".

> My hypothesis is that over the years "away and up" evolved into
> "way n'up" and then through a bad game of telephone into "weigh enough"!

> Andrew