USA's 'bright flame' (was Re: Betting Shirts)

USA's 'bright flame' (was Re: Betting Shirts)

Post by Sullys Ma » Wed, 03 May 1995 04:00:00


Quote:

>Subject: Re: Betting Shirts

>In article


>> The really interesting thing is the reflection of rowing in the US that this
>> debate provides.  Giving up one's shirt in college reflects the fact that
>> rowing in the US is seen as a sport that one pursues for a very brief time.
>> Thus, individual races are a huge deal, as opposed to being seen as a small
>> step in one's evolution as a rower.  If people rowed for longer, and
>> there were many more races (e.g. Europe), then these goofy marketing
>> campaign-like features of the sport (e.g. exchanging shirts and acting
(deleted)

>Now I would be the first to lament the shortness of the collegiate rowing
>experience. I took up rowing my freshman year and now this being my junior
>year I'm just beginning to get a real sense of the sport and its enormous
>possibilities. I regret that I have but one more year to give to this
>endeavor. My body is just getting the idea, my heart is inextricably bound
>up in the sport, and my mind is just learning the true meaning of racing.
>I almost wish that I had another year of eligibility. That somewhow I
>could be "redshirted" and magically given that little extra time.

>But I know that is impossible. I know that I have exactly four years and
>no more to row collegiately. And I know even more painfully that
>afterwards I probably will never has such an opportunity to row. That is
>the reality of the situation. I must begin to make a life for myself which
>probably won't allow the time that this sport demands for excellence. And
>if I row I want nothing less than the best from myself.

>This is the attitude that I have learned from collegiate rowing. The time
>is short, too short to waste time or effort. I have become keenly aware of
>the power and beauty of those moments on the water for I have only a
>limited amount. So I say what is wrong with a life short but intense, a
>rowing career only four years in length but ancient in breadth and depth.
>Rowing in the United States is flawed, but rowing in Europe is not
>perfect. We have our shining moments of perfection. I don't think it's
>right to forget them. They include the traditions of collegiate rowing, of
>the clubs of Philadelphia and Boston, of betting shirts. There are reasons
>rowing is unlike any other sport in America, and American rowing is so
>unlike the sport in other countries.

I'm very curious as to why you feel your competitive rowing career
MUST end when you graduate Yale?  I don't believe George was making
a qualitative comparison about which place rowing is 'better', but
that the perspectives are different in different places, and often
the perspectives are different in the same place.

We had a thread a ways back about 'What's wrong with USRowing as an
organization'.  There were some differing opinions, of course, among
them was the idea that the camp systems and national selection
criteria have killed the club systems.  Another was that the club
system was already flawed and failing - that there are no inherhent
incentives in the US to row unless you got a national team shot.

Is this a situation where you have a grad school lined up, or job
lined up that is far away from a racing shell?  Is it a situation
that you feel it's only worth doing if you felt you could make a
national team?

I'd be interested in your perspective.

Mike

 
 
 

USA's 'bright flame' (was Re: Betting Shirts)

Post by woodl » Sat, 06 May 1995 04:00:00

Quote:

> I'm very curious as to why you feel your competitive rowing career
> MUST end when you graduate Yale?  I don't believe George was making
> a qualitative comparison about which place rowing is 'better', but
> that the perspectives are different in different places, and often
> the perspectives are different in the same place.

> We had a thread a ways back about 'What's wrong with USRowing as an
> organization'.  There were some differing opinions, of course, among
> them was the idea that the camp systems and national selection
> criteria have killed the club systems.  Another was that the club
> system was already flawed and failing - that there are no inherhent
> incentives in the US to row unless you got a national team shot.

> Is this a situation where you have a grad school lined up, or job
> lined up that is far away from a racing shell?  Is it a situation
> that you feel it's only worth doing if you felt you could make a
> national team?

> I'd be interested in your perspective.

> Mike

The reason that I cannot pursue rowing after college is simple. I don't
have the money to row. Right now I enjoy the sport at the expense of Yale
University. My financial state barely allows me to attend Yale, even with
financial aid. After I graduate my resources become even more scarce. I
have loans and no more parental support. Now if I REALLY wanted to row I
could, but to do so I would have to go through a fair amount of personal
pain and sacrifice. I would have to go to a city with a viable club
system, I would have to allocate the funds out my paychecks (assuming I
have some) away from other resources, and would have to find the time to
commit to the sport while trying to forge my way in the world.

Like I said if I really wanted to row I could find a way. But right now
from my perspective the effort, that such a thing would entail, would
spoil the enjoyment I get from rowing. I would rather enjoy this moment
and walk away from rowing with a sweet taste in my mouth, rather than the
bitter memory that might develop in the big bad world. This is not an
indictment of USrowing or America in general. I regard it as the facts of
life. I got a lucky break when I chose to come to Yale. Many people don't
get such an opportunity to sample rowing for four years. Like it or not,
rowing is a rich sport. It takes significant resources, connections, and
time that most people out there simply don't have. I'll be one of those
people in a little over a year. That's all that I was saying.

Jeremy Woodlee

--
Posted/mailed from a Macintosh with a room connection to Yale University's campus network.

Yale University assumes no responsibilities for either the content of this article or the identity of the author

 
 
 

USA's 'bright flame' (was Re: Betting Shirts)

Post by BilMcGow » Tue, 09 May 1995 04:00:00

Please contact me to talk to you about all of the rowing possibilities
that lie ahead of you as a graduating student.  Your rowing career is by
no means over, in fact,  it's truely just beginning.  Rowing is a
life-long sport.   And unless you're planning on dying in the very near
future, the best is yet to come.  
Bill McGowan, USRowing East Field Service Coordinator, 5 Gerrish Street,
Brighton, MA 02135-1704 USRowing Phone/Fax/Answering Machine
(617)787-5060;

NJ, PA, NY, CT, RI, MA, VT, NH, ME.

 
 
 

USA's 'bright flame' (was Re: Betting Shirts)

Post by David Sima » Tue, 09 May 1995 04:00:00

On 5 May 1995, it was written:

Quote:
> Now if I REALLY wanted to row I
> could, but to do so I would have to go through a fair amount of personal
> pain and sacrifice. I would have to go to a city with a viable club
> system, I would have to allocate the funds out my paychecks (assuming I
> have some) away from other resources, and would have to find the time to
> commit to the sport while trying to forge my way in the world.

> Like I said if I really wanted to row I could find a way. But right now
> from my perspective the effort, that such a thing would entail, would
> spoil the enjoyment I get from rowing. I would rather enjoy this moment
> and walk away from rowing with a sweet taste in my mouth, rather than the
> bitter memory that might develop in the big bad world. This is not an
> indictment of USrowing or America in general. I regard it as the facts of
> life. I got a lucky break when I chose to come to Yale. Many people don't
> get such an opportunity to sample rowing for four years. Like it or not,
> rowing is a rich sport. It takes significant resources, connections, and
> time that most people out there simply don't have. I'll be one of those
> people in a little over a year. That's all that I was saying.

> Jeremy Woodlee

> --

God, this is depressing ...

If the rowing life ends at 23 years, then what the hell am I doing at
5:30 every morning?

Chin up, lad.  Give it go, and you might find that you like
post-collegiate rowing better that the collegiate variety.  At least you
won't have to bother with that shirt-racing nonsense any more.

David S.

 
 
 

USA's 'bright flame' (was Re: Betting Shirts)

Post by Michael Hartma » Thu, 11 May 1995 04:00:00

   Perhaps to the dismay of a few readers here *smirk* the guy that
got me to start rowing in high school was 67 years old at the time.
He was from Philadelphia, and began sculling in his 40s (if I
remember correctly) at Undine. He has been extremely active in
masters rowing, and has the honor of being a part of the titanium
duo American Rowing wrote an article about a while back (he and another
member of his multiple world championships 4+ both have titanium body
parts serving them quite well).

   I don't know how many more masters rowers read this newsgroup,
but I am sure those that are here could tell hundreds of stories of
how much the sport has meant to them.

-Michael Hartman

 
 
 

USA's 'bright flame' (was Re: Betting Shirts)

Post by Meredith Morris-Ba » Thu, 11 May 1995 04:00:00

I

Quote:

>   I don't know how many more masters rowers read this newsgroup,
>but I am sure those that are here could tell hundreds of stories of
>how much the sport has meant to them.

>-Michael Hartman

Thanks, Michael for a thread worth discussing!  

How's this - You know you're a Masters Rower when a 42spm at the start is
the highlite of the race.

You know you are a Master's Rower when.....

Your knees creak louder than the oarlocks.

5 six minute pieces at 30spm turns into a long, low row to count the herons.

Your Lycra has lost its girding capabilities.

You know everyone at the starting line, in including the ref, chief, and
line judge.

Psyching out the other rowers involves comparisons of the profit margin of
your company.

There are more Volvos in the parking lot than Jeep wranglers.

You discuss your training techniques over nachos and beer.

Anyone else?

mobabbb

 
 
 

USA's 'bright flame' (was Re: Betting Shirts)

Post by gbenn.. » Sat, 13 May 1995 04:00:00

Quote:

>You know you are a Master's Rower when.....

You beat the boat in the next lane by 45 seconds & find out they had a
46 second handicap.

Instead of comparing blisters, you compare A/T and speed curves from your
Empacher/Big Blade/SpeedBoss/Heart Monitor/Lap Top Computer custom software
output...