Going "rightward"

Going "rightward"

Post by Henning Lippk » Sat, 19 Oct 2002 20:08:02


Quote:
> On a side note, what do you think of the megalomaniacal subdirectory
> naming "ber-Empacher"..?

Error 403 - Forbidden ;-)

Seems we have to wait a little longer for this great invention what will be
called berEmpacher.  Maybe its meaning is berWasser? Which translates as
'floating'.

BTW, Thomas Lange is living 20 km south of me. He also was invited to join
an eight [with me :-)] this year, but was busy in some way.

-HL

 
 
 

Going "rightward"

Post by MisteurKott » Sat, 19 Oct 2002 21:20:27

do y'all scull left over
| right

Yes I do.
Apparently, my last training session confirms that it comes from my squaring
too late, particularly on the left handside. The blades do not enter the
water perfectly squared.

How do you obtain that perfect rowing movement ?

Cheers,

Tristan
Rowing froggy

 
 
 

Going "rightward"

Post by Ewoud Dronker » Sat, 19 Oct 2002 21:42:52

Quote:

>do y'all scull left over right

>Yes I do.
>Apparently, my last training session confirms that it comes from my squaring
>too late, particularly on the left handside. The blades do not enter the
>water perfectly squared.

He meant holding the left hand above the right hand, midways during
the stroke (and the recover), when the sculls overlap.

I understand what you're saying, but I'm not sure what it has to do
with "left over right", and what the 'it' is in "it comes from".

 
 
 

Going "rightward"

Post by MisteurKott » Sun, 20 Oct 2002 00:36:03

|
| He meant holding the left hand above the right hand, midways during
| the stroke (and the recover), when the sculls overlap.

OK. I understand that.

|
| I understand what you're saying, but I'm not sure what it has to do
| with "left over right", and what the 'it' is in "it comes from".
|

In fact, at the beginning of this discussion I was asking why my boat
systematically steers to the right. And, in fact, "it comes from" (well,
apparently) the way the blades enter the water.

 
 
 

Going "rightward"

Post by Ewoud Dronker » Sun, 20 Oct 2002 00:49:22

Quote:

>In fact, at the beginning of this discussion I was asking why my boat
>systematically steers to the right.

Ah sorry, I only looked at the post you were replying to.

Quote:
>And, in fact, "it comes from" (well,
>apparently) the way the blades enter the water.

Yes, that may very well be true.
 
 
 

Going "rightward"

Post by edgar cov » Sun, 20 Oct 2002 04:35:37



Quote:

>>Not that I particuylarly agree with this post but...do y'all scull left over
>>right like us Yanks or Vice-Versa?

>Yes. Only the East-Germans sculled right over left.

I am not an East German but have always sculled right over left...

--
edgar (remove nospam from return address for e-mail reply)

 
 
 

Going "rightward"

Post by Ewoud Dronker » Sun, 20 Oct 2002 06:00:19

Quote:

>I am not an East German but have always sculled right over left...

How peculiar. Did you only ever go out in the single scull, never done
any crew sculling? And did you always have your own private single
scull, and adjusted the oarlocks for your right over left style?
(right oarlock half an inch higher).

Or do you just now realize why crew sculling never went as smooth as
single sculling, or why *you* had always scabs on your *left*
knuckles..? :-)

 
 
 

Going "rightward"

Post by Carl Dougla » Sun, 20 Oct 2002 07:01:55


Quote:

>>I am not an East German but have always sculled right over left...

>How peculiar. Did you only ever go out in the single scull, never done
>any crew sculling? And did you always have your own private single
>scull, and adjusted the oarlocks for your right over left style?
>(right oarlock half an inch higher).

>Or do you just now realize why crew sculling never went as smooth as
>single sculling, or why *you* had always scabs on your *left*
>knuckles..? :-)

Ewoud - Edgar's a lot older than you (even than me), which doesn't ever
come across in his writing so there's no reason for you to know this.

Crew sculling was almost unknown in the UK before about 30 years ago (&
maybe we still have some progress to make).

Long ago most of us started sculling uncoached, & under far less
pressure to perform than today.  We worked out what worked best without
undue advice or interference, & sculled with whichever overlap seemed to
suit us best.  We rarely, if ever, thought either for orthodoxy or who
we might need to scull with.  Even doubles were then rather scarce.  It
was the odd sods who sculled (beg pardon, Edgar!) & all the rest rowed
sweep.

IIRC, the very successful GBR Hart/Ballieu 2x wasn't held back too badly
by having one who preferred L/R & the other who liked R/L.

Dropping rather a large step in standard from those guys:
I learned to scull R/L & changed half-way through my career as an open
sculler (before we had lightweights) when I borrowed a boat plainly
rigged L/R to race (& win) our Boston Marathon.  Not too difficult to
do, as I recall, but sometimes in the next few months I'd get a bit
confused.  But, then, some things hardly change.

Reverting to the original topic, if I may, the inability to scull
straight in a boat which runs perfectly straight when you are not
sculling is (obviously) due to asymmetrical & asynchronous application
of power with the 2 hands.  This problem is exacerbated if the sculler
sculls with large vertical separations of their hands.

We have subjected this problem to instrumented & filmed analysis, which
made the cause strikingly obvious:-

If the hands are more separated vertically at catch & finish than the
difference in rigger height warrants (a 1cm separation of oarlock height
indicates a 15mm separation of hand height at catch) it is hard, even
unsafe, to pull an equally hard finish with the lower hand, because you
then have tilted the boat so much that the lowered pin has far more
outward lateral pitch & the upper pin may even have significant inward
lateral pitch.  You can see that this will cause the lower hand's blade
to dig and the upper hand's blade to wash out.  It is then a natural but
unsensed reaction to lighten the effort on the lower hand.  So the boat
undergoes a twitch towards the side with the lower hand at the finish &
continues in that altered direction (but straight) until the next catch.

You will probably get the reverse effect at the catch, but that is
normally less important than the finish effect, especially when the
pressure is increased.

Cheers -
Carl
Carl Douglas Racing Shells        -
    Fine Small-Boats/AeRoWing low-drag Riggers/Advanced Accessories
Write: The Boathouse, Timsway, Chertsey Lane, Staines TW18 3JY, UK

URLs:  www.carldouglas.co.uk (boats) & www.aerowing.co.uk (riggers)

 
 
 

Going "rightward"

Post by edgar cov » Sun, 20 Oct 2002 07:27:29



Quote:

>>I am not an East German but have always sculled right over left...

>How peculiar. Did you only ever go out in the single scull, never done
>any crew sculling?

Originally, yes, and so I never gave the matter any thought until it was
too late to think of changing.  But in the last few years I have sculled
in veteran quads and managed reasonably well to fit in, although
obviously it is not ideal to be different
Quote:
>And did you always have your own private single
>scull, and adjusted the oarlocks for your right over left style?
>(right oarlock half an inch higher).

No, I always scull with the oarlocks level and have always tried to keep
the hands level too, right hand in front, rather than having my right
hand on top.
Quote:

>Or do you just now realize why crew sculling never went as smooth as
>single sculling,

Yes, always had to make an effort to keep especially level in the quad
otherwise there is always the feeling that the others are rolling the
boat over against you.
With the best will in the world, when you are racing flat out or the
water is rough it is hard to keep level and one hand always tends to go
above the other
Quote:
> or why *you* had always scabs on your *left*
>knuckles..? :-)

All scullers of either persuasion need to keep short nails...

--
edgar (remove nospam from return address for e-mail reply)

 
 
 

Going "rightward"

Post by MisteurKott » Sun, 20 Oct 2002 18:46:36

| Ah sorry, I only looked at the post you were replying to.

No worries.
In fact, the thread became suddenly overcrowded, while very quiet at the
beginning.
So I have plenty of opinions. A good thing.

Thanks for yours,

Tristan
Beginner working on his steering

 
 
 

Going "rightward"

Post by joan knap » Tue, 22 Oct 2002 03:39:10

Quote:


> >I am not an East German but have always sculled right over left...

I learned to row in the U.S., always sculled right hand over left,

Quote:

> How peculiar. Did you only ever go out in the single scull, never done
> any crew sculling? And did you always have your own private single
> scull, and adjusted the oarlocks for your right over left style?
> (right oarlock half an inch higher).

Learned crew sculling in quad before ever venturing out in a single.  No
coach commented/corrected right-over-left style. Interesting.
In single, oarlocks adjusted to same height.

Quote:

> Or do you just now realize why crew sculling never went as smooth as
> single sculling, or why *you* had always scabs on your *left*
> knuckles..? :-)

Took special note again this morning. Stayed in straight course if I
complete drive with legs/back completed before using arms. If I use arms
too early (right over left, catch both arms at same time) I drift off to
port. However, I am left-handed which is probably why I drift off to
port if I use my arms too early