Architecture student has boathouse design question

Architecture student has boathouse design question

Post by muff.. » Wed, 19 Feb 1997 04:00:00


I am a second year architecture student in Philadelphia.  Our second
project this semeter involves designing a boathouse.  I have never rowed
or been inside a boathouse so I was looking for some input.  What do you
like in th boathouses you have been in or used?  What don't you like?  
What do you wish you had in your boathouse? What exactly do you use the
boathouse for?

Thanks


 
 
 

Architecture student has boathouse design question

Post by pope.. » Thu, 20 Feb 1997 04:00:00

Quote:

> I am a second year architecture student in Philadelphia.  Our second
> project this semeter involves designing a boathouse.  I have never rowed
> or been inside a boathouse so I was looking for some input.  What do you
> like in th boathouses you have been in or used?  What don't you like?
> What do you wish you had in your boathouse? What exactly do you use the
> boathouse for?

All traditional Philadelphia boat houses must have a beermeister.

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Architecture student has boathouse design question

Post by gdo.. » Thu, 20 Feb 1997 04:00:00


Quote:

> I am a second year architecture student in Philadelphia.  Our second
> project this semeter involves designing a boathouse.  I have never rowed
> or been inside a boathouse so I was looking for some input.  

I suggest going down and take a look at some of them along Philadelphia's
Boathouse Row. If you're trying to design a boathouse, there's nothing like
seeing one. Believe me, looking at late 19th century work will spur you to
improve on it with your design.

Quote:
> What do you
> like in th boathouses you have been in or used?  

Weight rooms and sliding racks for the boats are nice. Also, convenient
and effective oar storage. Also....free soap and towels, but I guess
that's not in the architect's domain...

Quote:
> What don't you like?

Well....there's a world of things I don't like, but I can't
expect you to commit any felonies in "correcting" them....

Quote:
> What do you wish you had in your boathouse?

Hmmmm...more people with a clue? But in the meantime, more effective
storage of boats would help. Many houses can fit six singles in the same
space another club only puts four. There's a lot of wasted space in
racking boats.

Quote:
> What exactly do you use the
> boathouse for?

Depends on the priorities of membership....some clubs have Guinness on
tap....some send out 10-15 athletes every morning and night....some host
colleges with 30-40 member teams....some serve as day-care centers for
little high school brats.  :O

Quote:

> Thanks



Another thought would be energy efficiency. Boat clubs waste much money
on heating poorly insulated houses. And if it is going to be any type of
"community" project, don't forget disabled access.

Greg Doyle
Philadelphia, Pa.

 
 
 

Architecture student has boathouse design question

Post by BilMcGow » Thu, 20 Feb 1997 04:00:00

Best bet (IMHO) is for you to pay a visit to Boathouse Row on Kelly (sp?)
Drive, march right up to the front door of the boathouses there, and ask
if you can come in and snoop around.  I'm sure Greg Doyle could fill a few
volumes with suggestions....like....say.... modems in every locker, etc.!!
:o)

Bill McGowan
5 Gerrish Street
Brighton, MA 02135-1704
USA
(Yet another clever disclaimer to be updated in the near future)

 
 
 

Architecture student has boathouse design question

Post by Sullys Ma » Thu, 20 Feb 1997 04:00:00


Quote:

>Best bet (IMHO) is for you to pay a visit to Boathouse Row on Kelly (sp?)
>Drive, march right up to the front door of the boathouses there, and ask

I have a couple suggestions:

1.  As much of the footprint of the building as possible should be
used for boat storage/ repair with an eye for getting boats easily
to the water in masse, and easily to a boat trailer.  This is a
rather challenging design problem given the property you are given
to work with.  Many boathouses are built on a slope, where the
street entrance is a level above the bay doors out to the dock.

If you have lots of property, this is no problem, but a design
challenge for city boathouses (like the Row) which can barely fit
the boathouse they need on their property and have to get to the
street or a nearby parking lot to load trailer.

2.  Showers/training rooms/common areas should go at some OTHER
level than the boathouse bay as it takes away boat storage.  Usually
they are located above.   Design your showers with HIGH shower heads !
Princeton's are awesome.

3.  The upper floor should have room where rowers who've just finished
rowing can look out on the dock as people are coming in and rag on
them.

4.  Phones should go in the least accessible part of the building so
nobody is tempted to pick it up and get stuck giving directions,
and visiting crew members aren't tempted to call their girlfriend
or Mom.

5.  No trees anywhere near the tarmac please, unless they are pre-
existing historical monuments.

6.  There should be a lounge upstairs, a den-like place with a bar
with a beer tap and historical photos.  The beer tap in the wall
won't be functional but make it look like the club used to use the
place for something really fun.  Use this place as a storage room
for spare parts, outboards with frozen heads, and broken oars that
someday will be restored for trophy use.

7.  The office should have logical room for only two desks.  The
other coaches in the boathouse probably have other jobs and other
offices to go to anyway.

8.  Make as small a work area for the boatman as possible to encourage
him to get the boats repaired and back in service.  Make it long
enough to work around an eight, but not wide enough to have two.
That gives boatmen something real to complain about, as otherwise
they'd have to make something up.

9.  Mind your boatbay heights.  It needs to be high enough to accomodate
lots of boats, some less used equipment could be moved by climbing
a moveable stair deal, but don't make it so high that it becomes
inviting to store old beat up boats that might serve better as
restaurant displays.  You can have a plaque on the top rack that says:
'Trojan Pride, 1965 Pocock Battalion 8 now proudly displayed at TGIF
at the mall'.

(keep a couple seats, they won't notice)

10.  mind your boatbay and boatbay door widths.  Make them wide enough
to walk through without having to check your riggers as you exit
or enter down the middle, but not so wide as to encourage a possible
double exit, or two way traffic.

Mike

 
 
 

Architecture student has boathouse design question

Post by KGlowa75 » Sat, 22 Feb 1997 04:00:00

Boy... you guys have it so good!  "Guiness on tap..."

I'd be plenty happy with running water and a toilet!!  No rats would also
be nice.

Karen

 
 
 

Architecture student has boathouse design question

Post by Koster J.A » Sat, 22 Feb 1997 04:00:00

Quote:



> >Best bet (IMHO) is for you to pay a visit to Boathouse Row on Kelly (sp?)
> >Drive, march right up to the front door of the boathouses there, and ask

> I have a couple suggestions:

> 1.  As much of the footprint of the building as possible should be
> used for boat storage/ repair with an eye for getting boats easily
> to the water in masse, and easily to a boat trailer.  This is a
> rather challenging design problem given the property you are given
> to work with.  Many boathouses are built on a slope, where the
> street entrance is a level above the bay doors out to the dock.

> If you have lots of property, this is no problem, but a design
> challenge for city boathouses (like the Row) which can barely fit
> the boathouse they need on their property and have to get to the
> street or a nearby parking lot to load trailer.

I was at a Belgian rowing club (in Brugge) where the entrances to the
two boat areas are at a 90 degree angle to the boat, when carried
to/from the water. Also the space between these two (facing) entrances
is about 5-6 metres! This leads to akward turning manouvres twice each
outing. I suggest this should be avoided when designing a boathouse!

|----     -------|      |
        ^               |
        |               |
    entrances           |  water
        |               |
|----   v ---|          |

  Adriaan Koster
  Computerscience, VU Amsterdam

  voice: +31 20 4447666

 
 
 

Architecture student has boathouse design question

Post by Mike » Tue, 25 Feb 1997 04:00:00

If it's not too late, I have a few thoughts, too:

1. Be sure the ceiling in the boat bay is high enough to maneuver the oars
into a vertical storage position.  I've been in a few boathouses where the
distance from the floor to the ceiling was less than 12 feet, and getting
oars in and out was a real pain.

2. Pay real attention to how boats can be loaded into the boathouse from a
trailer.  My college crew would use the MIT boathouse when we rowed in
Boston, and in order to get the boats into the boathouse we had to park the
trailer parallel with the water (the road is several feet above water level
at that point in Cambridge, MA, with the "bank" of the river a stone wall)
-- and then manhandle our boats over the railing and down several feet to
people waiting on the dock near the wall.  Much too strenuous, and I was
always afraid we'd drop a boat.  A good example is the Dartmouth College
(my alma mater) boathouse in Hanover, NH, which has a road alongside the
boathouse leading down to the docks -- getting boats into the house from a
trailer is a simple matter of walking them down the road onto the dock, and
then walking up into the bays.

3. I'm a skeptic about sliding racks -- Dartmouth put them in when the new
boathouse was  built in 1986 or so, and we used them for about a week
before they got stuck.  Not worth the expense or trouble.

4. One thing I like -- a balcony, above the boathouse doors, from which
spectators can observe and an announcer can call the progress of the race
to the crowd.  And if the boathouse is in England, it needs wall space in a
"finished" upstairs room (not a locker room!) to display the oars the crews
have won in their rowing victories.  Sadly, painting oars to commemorate a
victory is not an American tradition...

Good luck!

Mike Freidberg

Quote:
> > I am a second year architecture student in Philadelphia.  Our second
> > project this semeter involves designing a boathouse.  I have never
rowed
> > or been inside a boathouse so I was looking for some input.  
> > What do you
> > like in th boathouses you have been in or used?  
> > What don't you like?
> > What do you wish you had in your boathouse?
> > What exactly do you use the
> > boathouse for?

> > Thanks



 
 
 

Architecture student has boathouse design question

Post by W. M. Grave » Thu, 27 Feb 1997 04:00:00

At Reading University we had a new boat house built about 7 years ago with
very little input from the rowers at the time. The architect was the Univ.
Bursars rowing coach about 40 years ago. There are a few good points and a
few bad ones too:

1) It is desirable to have bays of boats so that the space is utilised but
within that there should be allowance for easy access from bay to bay
without having to leave the building. Just try mending a boat and having
to keep climbing over boats etc to get to different tools that you hadn't
planned for.

2) A fixed blade rack near the exit to the bays is much better than some
hideous rack on wheels which is less controllable than a shopping trolley.
It also reduces the risk of some dosy twit taking clumps out of your brand
new empacher 8 with the blade.

3) Allow for extensions in the future. Our BH has a few doors on the
outside of the first floor which open onto nothingness!!

4) Try to make the bay doors high enough to be able to carry an 8 with
arms locked straight - don't forget the deep fins and that rowers can be
6'10".

5) Sliding racks are very useful and reduce possible damage to or by
riggers (the sticky-outy bits).

6) Most important - put the boat house near a body of water preferably
where people can row, and also put it fairly close to areas of population.
The Saharan Nomads BC, you will note, did not perform very well in Henley
last year.

7) The building should have rooms upstairs for torture chambers and also
for club functions if possible.

8) Put changing rooms for both sexes in. It should go without saying but
our new one doesn't because the ladies were deemed to have their own boat
house which at the time was probably more used by local rats than rowers.

9) Allow for good drainage of water from the front.

You could try contacting Hampton School in Hampton, UK. They have a very
good design on the drawing board ready for the builders to start very
soon. It will be the most up to date BH in the country when it is
completed. All the best,

Will Graves

'Rowers are the brawn, coxes are the brain'

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