Tideway at low tide

Tideway at low tide

Post by david.ballar » Mon, 13 Aug 2001 18:33:23


I am back on the Tideway next weekend in a single after a break of many
years. I last had steering responsibility (in a 4-) in 1976! I can remember
there being many spits of land at low tide, which is when I will first go
out. Are there any tips on navigation so as to keep my shell from getting
damaged?

Thanks

David

 
 
 

Tideway at low tide

Post by chris harriso » Thu, 16 Aug 2001 03:17:44



Quote:
> I am back on the Tideway next weekend in a single after a break of many
> years. I last had steering responsibility (in a 4-) in 1976! I can remember
> there being many spits of land at low tide, which is when I will first go
> out. Are there any tips on navigation so as to keep my shell from getting
> damaged?

At low tide, working from Putney upstream, the bit at the end of the wall
by the brook can be troublesome. Generally the shore from the mile post
up around the corner past Harrods is just too crinkly. With the stream as
strong as it has been recently, keeping yourself tucked in can be a task
in itself.

Low tide can mean that you can't make it under the inside arch of
Hammersmith, which makes for an entertaining crash point as boats from
both sides aim for that second lamp-post ...

Keeping tight round the corner after St Pauls can be a bit of a challenge
and then there's the perennial boat magnet of the outfall pipe on the
Surrey bank opposite the top of the island, just after which there is a
generally very shallow area before the bend - scraping *both* blades on
the bottom when you think you should have loads of room is not unusual -
keep it quite wide, although watch for oncoming traffic as the moored
boats do rather restrict the flow somewhat.

Although Bernoulli might have everyone speeding up at this point, this is
around the crossing point so another careful eye, after which the inside
of that bend can be a little shallow, until well after the bandstand. If
there's a decent amount of water in the river, the trees here can be a
little annoying. At lower tides you tend to have to come out a little
outside Emmanuel/Civil Service, before Barnes. The corner leading around
to Chiswick can sometimes force you a little wide. Just before Tideway
Scullers often needs careful negotiation - not least for the hordes of
J13 singles buzzing around like flies.

Upstream of Chiswick, you cross again and there are one or two spots on
the Surrey shore which might force you out. Hold your nose for the sewage
pipe just downstream of UL.

Coming back again, the only real area of note is the Fulham Flats, from
the Crabtree to Craven Cottage. Just remember the mantra about not
cutting the corner - but don't go so wide that you acquaint yourself too
closely with the black buoy.

--
chris harrison
webmaster, vesta rowing club
http://www.vesta.rowing.org.uk/

 
 
 

Tideway at low tide

Post by david.ballar » Thu, 16 Aug 2001 04:48:33

Thanks Chris - that is *exactly* what I was hoping for. My poor old boat ran
aground once before I think and I don't wish to inflict the same on it
again - or another bout of refurbishing on myself.

8-)

I also remeber going aground in a 4+ just before Hammersmith once and having
to walk the boat back 1.5 miles in our socks on the stony path. No wish to
repeat that either.

Thanks again

David


Quote:


> > I am back on the Tideway next weekend in a single after a break of many
> > years. I last had steering responsibility (in a 4-) in 1976! I can
remember
> > there being many spits of land at low tide, which is when I will first
go
> > out. Are there any tips on navigation so as to keep my shell from
getting
> > damaged?

> At low tide, working from Putney upstream, the bit at the end of the wall
> by the brook can be troublesome. Generally the shore from the mile post
> up around the corner past Harrods is just too crinkly. With the stream as
> strong as it has been recently, keeping yourself tucked in can be a task
> in itself.

> Low tide can mean that you can't make it under the inside arch of
> Hammersmith, which makes for an entertaining crash point as boats from
> both sides aim for that second lamp-post ...

> Keeping tight round the corner after St Pauls can be a bit of a challenge
> and then there's the perennial boat magnet of the outfall pipe on the
> Surrey bank opposite the top of the island, just after which there is a
> generally very shallow area before the bend - scraping *both* blades on
> the bottom when you think you should have loads of room is not unusual -
> keep it quite wide, although watch for oncoming traffic as the moored
> boats do rather restrict the flow somewhat.

> Although Bernoulli might have everyone speeding up at this point, this is
> around the crossing point so another careful eye, after which the inside
> of that bend can be a little shallow, until well after the bandstand. If
> there's a decent amount of water in the river, the trees here can be a
> little annoying. At lower tides you tend to have to come out a little
> outside Emmanuel/Civil Service, before Barnes. The corner leading around
> to Chiswick can sometimes force you a little wide. Just before Tideway
> Scullers often needs careful negotiation - not least for the hordes of
> J13 singles buzzing around like flies.

> Upstream of Chiswick, you cross again and there are one or two spots on
> the Surrey shore which might force you out. Hold your nose for the sewage
> pipe just downstream of UL.

> Coming back again, the only real area of note is the Fulham Flats, from
> the Crabtree to Craven Cottage. Just remember the mantra about not
> cutting the corner - but don't go so wide that you acquaint yourself too
> closely with the black buoy.

> --
> chris harrison
> webmaster, vesta rowing club
> http://www.vesta.rowing.org.uk/


 
 
 

Tideway at low tide

Post by edgar cov » Thu, 16 Aug 2001 04:53:54



Quote:
>Low tide can mean that you can't make it under the inside arch of
>Hammersmith, which makes for an entertaining crash point as boats from
>both sides aim for that second lamp-post ...

Surely the second lamppost only applies when you are coming down river
with the tide? Going up at low tide you need to stay as close to the
shore as you can, consistent with the need to go outside the bridge
buttress.
Quote:

>Keeping tight round the corner after St Pauls can be a bit of a challenge
>and then there's the perennial boat magnet of the outfall pipe on the
>Surrey bank opposite the top of the island, just after which there is a
>generally very shallow area before the bend - scraping *both* blades on
>the bottom when you think you should have loads of room is not unusual -
>keep it quite wide, although watch for oncoming traffic as the moored
>boats do rather restrict the flow somewhat.

Not clear what you mean. AFAIK there are no moored boats on the Surrey
side between the top of the Eyot and the upper side of Barnes Bridge. So
exactly where have you crossed over? The recognised crossing is upstream
of all the moorings.
Quote:

>Although Bernoulli might have everyone speeding up at this point, this is
>around the crossing point so another careful eye, after which the inside
>of that bend can be a little shallow, until well after the bandstand. If
>there's a decent amount of water in the river, the trees here can be a
>little annoying.

He was talking about low water
<snipped. (above Chiswick Bridge my knowledge is limited)
--
edgar (remove nospam from return address for e-mail reply)
 
 
 

Tideway at low tide

Post by PERD » Thu, 16 Aug 2001 06:28:53

Chris Harrison has given a good description of a scull on the Tideway.
I can only say two things for the possible benefit of David Ballard.
One is that at every level of tide the Tideway is a totally different
map. And two is that anyone new or returning to sculling on this water
should be humble enough to look round say every five strokes for at
least a week or two.

Best wishes,
Perdy.

 
 
 

Tideway at low tide

Post by James Eld » Thu, 16 Aug 2001 18:08:03

Quote:



> >Low tide can mean that you can't make it under the inside arch of
> >Hammersmith, which makes for an entertaining crash point as boats from
> >both sides aim for that second lamp-post ...
> Surely the second lamppost only applies when you are coming down river
> with the tide? Going up at low tide you need to stay as close to the
> shore as you can, consistent with the need to go outside the bridge
> buttress.

I think that Chris perhaps had a :) on his face when he wrote this.
My top tip in this situation is to come out wide early, so that
oncoming traffic can see you clearly a long way off.  Darting out from
behind the buttress at the last moment can cause heartstoppage.

Quote:
> >Keeping tight round the corner after St Pauls can be a bit of a challenge
> >and then there's the perennial boat magnet of the outfall pipe on the
> >Surrey bank opposite the top of the island, just after which there is a
> >generally very shallow area before the bend - scraping *both* blades on
> >the bottom when you think you should have loads of room is not unusual -
> >keep it quite wide, although watch for oncoming traffic as the moored
> >boats do rather restrict the flow somewhat.
> Not clear what you mean. AFAIK there are no moored boats on the Surrey
> side between the top of the Eyot and the upper side of Barnes Bridge. So
> exactly where have you crossed over? The recognised crossing is upstream
> of all the moorings.

I think what Chris means is that the line of moored boats on the
Middlesex side at this point means boats moving with the stream will
be a little further to Surrey than they otherwise would be
(particularly if they are working side by side, overtaking etc).  So,
if you are on the Surrey bank, paddling against the tide, and are
having to come a bit wide to avoid the shallows, you should be wary of
boats travelling with the tide, who are a long way to your side of the
river.  Make sense?

Quote:

> >Although Bernoulli might have everyone speeding up at this point, this is
> >around the crossing point so another careful eye, after which the inside
> >of that bend can be a little shallow, until well after the bandstand. If
> >there's a decent amount of water in the river, the trees here can be a
> >little annoying.
> He was talking about low water

Still a worthwhile point to mention, though.  I've seen many, many
singles (and coxed boats occasionally...) tanking it into the willow
trees.  In fact, I was a little concerned about Oxford in the Boat
Race this year.

I would back up everything Chris says, but would especially emphasise
that the shoals either side of Barn Elms boathouse now come a very
long way out into the river.

 
 
 

Tideway at low tide

Post by Ruscoe, Mark [LON40:7E58:EXCH » Thu, 16 Aug 2001 18:45:09


Quote:
> Chris Harrison has given a good description of a scull on the Tideway.
> I can only say two things for the possible benefit of David Ballard.
> One is that at every level of tide the Tideway is a totally different
> map. And two is that anyone new or returning to sculling on this water
> should be humble enough to look round say every five strokes for at
> least a week or two.

> Best wishes,
> Perdy.

I know we all get slack about it but you should be
looking around that frequently whatever your level
of experience and local knowledge. The most important
navigational requirement is to keep a good lookout
and most collisions on the tideway happen as a result
of lack of obsevation by both parties.
 
 
 

Tideway at low tide

Post by Ruscoe, Mark [LON40:7E58:EXCH » Thu, 16 Aug 2001 18:40:16



Quote:


> > >Low tide can mean that you can't make it under the inside arch of
> > >Hammersmith, which makes for an entertaining crash point as boats from
> > >both sides aim for that second lamp-post ...
> > Surely the second lamppost only applies when you are coming down river
> > with the tide? Going up at low tide you need to stay as close to the
> > shore as you can, consistent with the need to go outside the bridge
> > buttress.

> I think that Chris perhaps had a :) on his face when he wrote this.
> My top tip in this situation is to come out wide early, so that
> oncoming traffic can see you clearly a long way off.  Darting out from
> behind the buttress at the last moment can cause heartstoppage.

Also if you steer out early and gradually you can better avoid getting
pushed
out too far from the bank by the stream.

Quote:
> > >Keeping tight round the corner after St Pauls can be a bit of a
challenge
> > >and then there's the perennial boat magnet of the outfall pipe on the
> > >Surrey bank opposite the top of the island, just after which there is a
> > >generally very shallow area before the bend - scraping *both* blades on
> > >the bottom when you think you should have loads of room is not
unusual -
> > >keep it quite wide, although watch for oncoming traffic as the moored
> > >boats do rather restrict the flow somewhat.

Not only is it shallow there but the flat sandbanks at that point quite
often
have substantial branches sticking out of them (as well as traffic cones and
a
pushchair) which can know a sculling blade out of your hand - I once found
myself still in the boat but with one hand on the bottom of the river (in
about a
foot or so of water) stopping me from taking a dip.

Quote:

> [snip]

> I would back up everything Chris says, but would especially emphasise
> that the shoals either side of Barn Elms boathouse now come a very
> long way out into the river.

Notably, at some points of the tide these shoals turn into islands which can
catch you out badly if you are following the bank and haven't had a look
recently.
 
 
 

Tideway at low tide

Post by chris harriso » Thu, 16 Aug 2001 23:49:54



Quote:
> Chris Harrison has given a good description of a scull on the Tideway.
> I can only say two things for the possible benefit of David Ballard.
> One is that at every level of tide the Tideway is a totally different
> map. And two is that anyone new or returning to sculling on this water
> should be humble enough to look round say every five strokes for at
> least a week or two.

And then only really consider extending the inter-look-period to six
strokes.

At steady state, 10 strokes would be 20-30 seconds. Lots can happen in
thirty seconds - upwards of 100 metres, for a start. I know my eyesight
isn't so great as to get that detailed a view in the glances over my
shoulder that I tend to take!

--
chris harrison
webmaster, vesta rowing club
http://www.vesta.rowing.org.uk/

 
 
 

Tideway at low tide

Post by Dan Cowto » Sat, 18 Aug 2001 04:34:01

David


Club has put together a very good guide to steering and navigation on the
Tideway.  This includes pretty much everything you would want to know and, I
believe, is approved not only by the ARA, but also by the Port Of London
Authority.

Section 5.2 of the document covers your specific query (and includes a
map!), although I can strongly recommend a review of the whole of this
excellently written document.

It is available from the ARA web site via this link
http://www.ara-rowing.org/arats22.htm .

Happy paddling

Dan


Quote:
> I am back on the Tideway next weekend in a single after a break of many
> years. I last had steering responsibility (in a 4-) in 1976! I can
remember
> there being many spits of land at low tide, which is when I will first go
> out. Are there any tips on navigation so as to keep my shell from getting
> damaged?

> Thanks

> David