wild and wooley Wednesday

wild and wooley Wednesday

Post by sull » Sun, 17 Mar 2013 03:40:40


My beginners teaching day is Wednesday.  I also have  Caroline show up
then who is rebuilding after severe brain trauma,  on Wednesdays she
stays in our small lagoon and reviews some basics.

So I have Ed coming back next wednesday, who is deaf, and a new
sculler Walter who is blind.
Ed's been out a few times,  so we're in cahoots,   I'll put Walter in
a double with me.

It'll be pitch dark,  only Walter won't be bothered.  Walter considers
himself an accomplished kayaker and canoer and has been asking just to
jump in one of the team boats and he'll figure it out.   How would he
know better, he's never seen it!!!

I'll let you know how it goes, should be a rodeo.

 
 
 

wild and wooley Wednesday

Post by John Greenl » Mon, 18 Mar 2013 10:00:43

Quote:

> My beginners teaching day is Wednesday.  I also have  Caroline show up
> then who is rebuilding after severe brain trauma,  on Wednesdays she
> stays in our small lagoon and reviews some basics.
> So I have Ed coming back next wednesday, who is deaf, and a new
> sculler Walter who is blind.
> Ed's been out a few times,  so we're in cahoots,   I'll put Walter in
> a double with me.
> It'll be pitch dark,  only Walter won't be bothered.  Walter considers
> himself an accomplished kayaker and canoer and has been asking just to
> jump in one of the team boats and he'll figure it out.   How would he
> know better, he's never seen it!!!
> I'll let you know how it goes, should be a rodeo.

Wow. please do let us know!!  I almost think that the blind fellow might have an easier time of it than the deaf.  I love to scull with my eyes closed,  and just feel and listen to the stroke- I often think I scull better that way.  But I do tend to hit things.

Cheers,

John G

 
 
 

wild and wooley Wednesday

Post by SingleMinde » Tue, 19 Mar 2013 10:11:07

Quote:


> > My beginners teaching day is Wednesday.  I also have  Caroline show up

> > then who is rebuilding after severe brain trauma,  on Wednesdays she

> > stays in our small lagoon and reviews some basics.

> > So I have Ed coming back next wednesday, who is deaf, and a new

> > sculler Walter who is blind.

> > Ed's been out a few times,  so we're in cahoots,   I'll put Walter in

> > a double with me.

> > It'll be pitch dark,  only Walter won't be bothered.  Walter considers

> > himself an accomplished kayaker and canoer and has been asking just to

> > jump in one of the team boats and he'll figure it out.   How would he

> > know better, he's never seen it!!!

> > I'll let you know how it goes, should be a rodeo.

> Wow. please do let us know!!  I almost think that the blind fellow might have an easier time of it than the deaf.  I love to scull with my eyes closed,  and just feel and listen to the stroke- I often think I scull better that way.  But I do tend to hit things.

> Cheers,

> John G

My dad used to row in an eight with a blind man- apparently he did OK just on the feel and sound of the boat. Getting the whole crew to close their eyes for a bit is certainly a fairly common exercise...

 
 
 

wild and wooley Wednesday

Post by sculler.. » Thu, 21 Mar 2013 12:39:00

Quote:

> My beginners teaching day is Wednesday.  I also have  Caroline show up

> then who is rebuilding after severe brain trauma,  on Wednesdays she

> stays in our small lagoon and reviews some basics.

> So I have Ed coming back next wednesday, who is deaf, and a new

> sculler Walter who is blind.

> Ed's been out a few times,  so we're in cahoots,   I'll put Walter in

> a double with me.

> It'll be pitch dark,  only Walter won't be bothered.  Walter considers

> himself an accomplished kayaker and canoer and has been asking just to

> jump in one of the team boats and he'll figure it out.   How would he

> know better, he's never seen it!!!

> I'll let you know how it goes, should be a rodeo.

I'd love to hear how it goes with Walter... and how you might work with him to get him to follow in a team boat.  
 
 
 

wild and wooley Wednesday

Post by sull » Thu, 21 Mar 2013 15:03:58


Quote:

> > My beginners teaching day is Wednesday. ?I also have ?Caroline show up

> > then who is rebuilding after severe brain trauma, ?on Wednesdays she

> > stays in our small lagoon and reviews some basics.

> > So I have Ed coming back next wednesday, who is deaf, and a new

> > sculler Walter who is blind.

> > Ed's been out a few times, ?so we're in cahoots, ? I'll put Walter in

> > a double with me.

> > It'll be pitch dark, ?only Walter won't be bothered. ?Walter considers

> > himself an accomplished kayaker and canoer and has been asking just to

> > jump in one of the team boats and he'll figure it out. ? How would he

> > know better, he's never seen it!!!

> > I'll let you know how it goes, should be a rodeo.

> I'd love to hear how it goes with Walter... and how you might work with him to get him to follow in a team boat.

Team boats are going to be pretty simple once he
gets the bladework down, and basics like everyone
else.

If it turns out he enjoys rowing and wants to work
at it,   I'm going to get him into a single.

 
 
 

wild and wooley Wednesday

Post by sull » Fri, 22 Mar 2013 01:37:43


Quote:
> My beginners teaching day is Wednesday. ?I also have ?Caroline show up
> then who is rebuilding after severe brain trauma, ?on Wednesdays she
> stays in our small lagoon and reviews some basics.

> So I have Ed coming back next wednesday, who is deaf, and a new
> sculler Walter who is blind.
> Ed's been out a few times, ?so we're in cahoots, ? I'll put Walter in
> a double with me.

> It'll be pitch dark, ?only Walter won't be bothered. ?Walter considers
> himself an accomplished kayaker and canoer and has been asking just to
> jump in one of the team boats and he'll figure it out. ? How would he
> know better, he's never seen it!!!

> I'll let you know how it goes, should be a rodeo.

Went very well this morning.   Walt was a top 2% in coordination,  and
while I had to adjust my planning considerably to get him through
the parts we sighted ppl take for granted,  we covered more this
morning on the water than a typical first day student, got him
backing properly, and a bit of hold water.

Some notes:

1.  Walt was used to trailing the boat in carrying kayaks with
a partner.   I wanted him to lead so I could properly "cox"
us.   I had him bring his cane so he could be responsible for
his feet,  and that worked well.

2.  The Saturday walk thru of the property I had him do
before today was an hour well spent.   He got here this
morning already oriented, arrived early and found his way
to an erg before I got there.  Saved SO much time on
a workday.

3. walking on to the float and "toe to the edge" with the
boat caused me a bit of trepidation.   Walt felt comfortable
dropping to a knee when the boat went in the water,
that worked well.

4. Had him do it all, open oarlocks, put the oars in, etc,
in the same way I have sighted ppl.   One minor mistake
was that usually I'll have ppl open the outboard oarlock
before grabbing the oar to put in it.   I realized this was
a bit much for him not seeing,  so I put the oar out
on to the wing rigger, so he could open the oarlock, feel
for the shaft, put into the oarlock and lock all in one
basic motions.   I don't do this with other beginners for
marginal reasons I won't explain now.

My method for stepping in a boat, feeling the balance,
then bending down to touch gunwhale for balance on
the inboard and reaching out to do the oarlocks was
very effective for walt.

5.  I'll typically stick a first day person in an aero, have
him walk off the end of dock, then stop, bow out.  I'll
hold the boat steady and work them through holding
the handles, dealing with crossover, feathering,
most of a proper grip,  and finally some hands only
rowing, first a few strokes square and adding in feathering
pretty early.

I did this with him in the stern of the double, then
when he'd demonstrated his ability to row ok, I pulled
him back in and got into the bow.

When he was first in my grasp,  we worked initially
on feeling the blade orientation through the oarlock/sleeve
positioning.

Walt wanted to put a piece of tape on his handle to
let him know which direction the blade was facing.
I assured him it would be unnecessary, that by a
few sessions,  he'd be able to feel the position of
the blade.   So we spent some time feeling the positions.
once he could feel the differences, I had him pull the
oar inboard again so he could feel the blade shape
and feel the sleeve/collar shape.

Went very well.  Later after rowing around.   I had
him spin his oars quickly in different directions so
he lost track, then had him try to find oars flat position.

I did the same (without looking of course).

He's able to get oars out of the cabinet, though
currently I'm his guide, I walk in front and make
a footfall scrape every few steps and he's got
no problems.

He learned to back AND the rudimentary correct
hold water.   I generally teach backing first, then
hold water, but I reversed it today so that I can
get him to feel how to position the blades to recover
on the water in backing.  My method was good, I
rowed a few strokes easily and had him feather
the blades flat and slightly back so he could feel
the blade flow.   Had him hold for me several times,
played with the adjustment of how much pitch vs
how much holding pressure, then taught him to back
from there.  Went very well.    He backed expertly.
We rowed a dozen strokes then had him back again.
(sometimes confusing for beginners.)

Good athlete, will be a good sculler.

One more time in a double next week, and the
following Friday I'm launching him in an Aero.
I'll

 
 
 

wild and wooley Wednesday

Post by James H » Fri, 22 Mar 2013 02:24:16

Quote:

> My beginners teaching day is Wednesday.  I also have  Caroline show up

> then who is rebuilding after severe brain trauma,  on Wednesdays she

> stays in our small lagoon and reviews some basics.

> So I have Ed coming back next wednesday, who is deaf, and a new

> sculler Walter who is blind.

> Ed's been out a few times,  so we're in cahoots,   I'll put Walter in

> a double with me.

> It'll be pitch dark,  only Walter won't be bothered.  Walter considers

> himself an accomplished kayaker and canoer and has been asking just to

> jump in one of the team boats and he'll figure it out.   How would he

> know better, he's never seen it!!!

> I'll let you know how it goes, should be a rodeo.

Fantastic write up - I am right in there with you!

We underestimate how much of this is feel and we over rely on sight.

Pls keep us posted as Walt's progress is fascinating.

James

 
 
 

wild and wooley Wednesday

Post by sull » Fri, 22 Mar 2013 05:25:58


Quote:

> > My beginners teaching day is Wednesday. ?I also have ?Caroline show up

> > then who is rebuilding after severe brain trauma, ?on Wednesdays she

> > stays in our small lagoon and reviews some basics.

> > So I have Ed coming back next wednesday, who is deaf, and a new

> > sculler Walter who is blind.

> > Ed's been out a few times, ?so we're in cahoots, ? I'll put Walter in

> > a double with me.

> > It'll be pitch dark, ?only Walter won't be bothered. ?Walter considers

> > himself an accomplished kayaker and canoer and has been asking just to

> > jump in one of the team boats and he'll figure it out. ? How would he

> > know better, he's never seen it!!!

> > I'll let you know how it goes, should be a rodeo.

> Fantastic write up - I am right in there with you!

> We underestimate how much of this is feel and we over rely on sight.

> Pls keep us posted as Walt's progress is fascinating.

I was happy about our session this morning.   When
I told him I wanted to stick him in an Aero after the
next 2X session,  I was delighted that he told me that
it "went past his comfort zone" but was certainly
willing to try it.

I told him jokingly I wouldn't have to teach him how
to turn around and look where he's going!!
:^)

My prediction is that like all beginners, he'll have
trouble keeping a straight line, but that if I scull
out as what he calls a 'wing man', someone who
walks slightly ahead and he can follow by sound,
I think he'll have a great time sculling until he starts
going faster than me (won't take much).

 
 
 

wild and wooley Wednesday

Post by sull » Sun, 31 Mar 2013 03:49:05


snip

So this morning was the grand experiment.

Put Walt in an Aero.   Car.. and her dad were in Aeros,  it was foggy
and with
her vision difficulties I kept her in the lagoon with me to work on
her
releases and to work on keeping on right side.  I sent her dad out on
a limited course of his own.

I had huge doubts about this last night.   Walt had a lot of
trepidation
this morning,  but the sculling worked out great.

It was a low tide, our lagoon is about a 500 meter stretch
with a dog leg.

The previous two sessions, Walt already learned how to back,
hold water, river turn, etc, and we practiced it some.

He had difficulty remembering which way to square for
backing or for rowing,   it was as he said "a muscle memory
error" and was beginning to become a bit impatient with
himself.  I assured him that this is fairly typical of new
scullers, and I considered this really his first day sculling
since I wasn't next to him in a boat prompting him with
subtle cues, like 'oops', etc.

I allowed him to turn the oar wrong way, take a stroke
and feel the difficulty - better learning curve.

Because I was in a single,  I side rowed my boat up
against him so he could feel my blade in the water.
I had him tuck the stbd blade in his lap and hold
the port handle, then as he feathered his port, I
feathered my port oar where he could feel the
positions in the water.   This allowed him to visualize
the actual blade position when the oar is "flat", rather
than simply imagine it.

I teach backing recovery on the water, where you
hold the pitch of the oar to skim on top on the recovery.
This made a lot more sense then, though he was
able to do it very easily in the double.

Being alone in the aero caused some skill depreciation,
mostly from uncertainty and a bit of fear, but 25 mins
into the session where we'd traveled the length and back
and turned around a few times,  he was quite comfy
and sculling confidently and competently for a third time.

He's very coordinated, so when his sculling was clean enough
he went fairly straight.

I rowed ahead of him and used three agreed upon commands
for steering.  "left..right ... good".   This meant he would
pull harder left, pull harder right, "good" was he was on a good
course.    My thinking on this was that if someone were in
a launch,  pulling harder on the right side was the same as
moving the boat TO the right when you face the bow.
(yes I was confused thinking about it, but I got it now).

We'll consider port/stbd uses, but I think rowers he may
go out with could get confused if they're asking him to go
to port or pull harder with port, if they just say "port".

I'm thinking of a minimal verbiage system.  He is used to
using "clock" with assisting people which is ok for a
launch driver, but confusing for a sculler in front or beside him.

I've moved my new beginners to evenings so we'll do this
again next week, go out where there's more room.

In areas of the bay where it's not so noisy, I believe Walt
should be able to hear a sculler out in front of him and
follow w/o command, we'll see.

 
 
 

wild and wooley Wednesday

Post by sull » Fri, 12 Apr 2013 04:17:48


snip

Quote:

> In areas of the bay where it's not so noisy, I believe Walt
> should be able to hear a sculler out in front of him and
> follow w/o command, we'll see.

Update now a couple weeks later.

Walt's been out 2 more times in an Aero with me and
Caroline in our singles.   He tracked straight very well
such that all steering problems were me not paying
attention (I had to direct Caroline a bit more today, a
very low tide, and a number of scullers from differing
clubs were on the wrong side, so was spending a lot
of time being 'course ***'

Walt is able now to correct himself, that when he
takes a bad stroke that causes him to veer to one
side, he can correct on the next stroke.   We had
to negotiate a narrow passage because of the low
tide, and he cruised right thru with little correction.

His "on shore" boat handling is exemplary. He's
able to wash, put oars away, find his way around
the mess.  We move boats around with his cane,
when we put into rack or on to water, he telescopes
it and puts it in his pants.

The one issue is putting in the outboard oar.
He can step into boat, open the oarlock, position
it, but then when he reaches for the oar, it's
difficult to both hold the oar and feel out to
where the oarlock is, position the oarlock
and place it.    If he sets the oar out by the
pin, any slight movement of the boat can
cause it to roll down the front stay of the
Aero.   I had him place the blade face down on
the stay so it wouldn't roll, but he still has to
take his hand off the oarlock and hope the
oarlock doesn't swing around with boat movement,
else there's some fumble time.

We agreed to fumble and see if he can simply
gain dexterity,  then find another solution if it
remains difficult.

We could come up with something special,
but it may not transfer from shell to shell.

I had him row into the shoreline gently so he
could feel the what the lowtide shore was like-
it's very soft mud, and a gradual slope.  This
gives him a better picture of our bay.    I stopped
often and explained where we were, and what
was on each shore.

he's getting good positional sense of where he is in
our lagoon.

Today, he hung out and spun erg for a while
after the row,  he's playing with phone apps
that hook into the C-II monitor.    I started him
on some basic body mechanics.

His rowing problems are typical novice stuff,
splitting the legs open on the recovery,  gripping
tight with hands over time, but tends to go
straighter than most and is bopping right
along.

 
 
 

wild and wooley Wednesday

Post by Henry La » Fri, 12 Apr 2013 05:59:11


Quote:
> Update now a couple weeks later.

Fascinating!  I'm really glad you're posting this stuff Mike.

--

Henry Law            Manchester, England

 
 
 

wild and wooley Wednesday

Post by sull » Fri, 12 Apr 2013 06:27:30


Quote:

> > Update now a couple weeks later.

> Fascinating! ?I'm really glad you're posting this stuff Mike.

Thanks, Henry

I should add that he's learned to back and
hold water with excellent technique, so
directing him is piece of cake.

We're modifying the directional instructions
to where I can tell him "right two" meaning
steer to the right (or hard right foot) for two
strokes, then level out, rather than for me
to say "right" and then "straight" when he's
aligned.  I find myself correcting him and then
forgetting to tell him when he's correct.

He had one mistake immediately, turning
the oar the opposite way to back, which
is a way many scullers do it anyway.  I've
taught him to use the blade as designed,
if you get yourself stuck on a mudbar, you need
all the push you can muster to drive yourself
backward and off the mud-bar.

this was a matter of too long between rows,
though, and he had no trouble the rest of the
session.  We backed and held frequently, just
to make sure he could react when I needed him
to.   He's much more fit than I am, so it won't
be long before it'll take a bit of effort for me
to row ahead of him!!

 
 
 

wild and wooley Wednesday

Post by A. Duma » Fri, 12 Apr 2013 17:55:26

Quote:

> he telescopes
> it and puts it in his pants.

Don't we all.

Quote:
> The one issue is putting in the outboard oar.
> [...]
> We could come up with something special,
> but it may not transfer from shell to shell.

How about a piece of string attached to the open end of the oarlock.
Hold the other end of the string in one hand, rest the oar on top of the
string and let it slide into the oarlock.
 
 
 

wild and wooley Wednesday

Post by A. Duma » Fri, 12 Apr 2013 17:56:55

Quote:

> He had one mistake immediately, turning
> the oar the opposite way to back, which
> is a way many scullers do it anyway.

Yeah. No mistake! Much more stable, easier, with spoons flipped.
 
 
 

wild and wooley Wednesday

Post by sull » Sat, 13 Apr 2013 02:18:57


Quote:

> > He had one mistake immediately, turning
> > the oar the opposite way to back, which
> > is a way many scullers do it anyway.

> Yeah. No mistake! Much more stable, easier, with spoons flipped.

If you mean by pushing by using the convex side
of the blade, yes it is easier to learn just like
holding water incorrectly.