Built in lights for boats.

Built in lights for boats.

Post by Richard Packe » Tue, 26 Mar 2002 07:39:23



Quote:
> >A bracket that clips into an Empacher slot (which you can secure using a
> >small***or nut and bolt) would probably do the job.  Fixing an extra
> >Empacher slot at the stern shouldn't be too taxing either.

> At my current club, we use this system with all boats.

You don't have any photos you could show us do you?  I'd be very interested
to see them.

Richard

 
 
 

Built in lights for boats.

Post by Conor O'Neil » Wed, 27 Mar 2002 02:41:03

Richard, :

Quote:
> > HI Carl.
> > Here on the Charles we don't allow the use of bike lights especially
> > the flashing one.  By rule since the complete set of navigational
> > lights (green and red in front and white stern light in the back).
> > The Charles is considered an international waterway so theoretically
> > we have to respect the international navigation rules. We still have
> > people that don't respect these rules, but they are less and less
> > every year, since all the clubs are trying to enforce this rule.
> Um...my copy (1990) of both the International COLREGS and the US
> regulations for inland navigable waterways states:

> "Rule 25(d)(ii): A vessel under oars *may* (emphasis added) exhibit
> the lights prescribed in this Rule for sailing vessels, but if she
> does not she *shall* (again, emphasis added) have ready at hand an
> electric tourch or lighted lantern showing a white light which shall
> be exhibited in sufficiant time to prevent collision."

> So, where exactly does this requirement for a complete set of
> navigational lights come from? (And, no, I'm not suggesting that
> anyone row on the Charles at night without a complete set of lights.)

If you look at Rule 1 (b):-

"Nothing in these Rules shall interefere with the operation of special rules
made by an appropriate authority for roadsteads, harbours, rivers, lakes or
inland waterways connected with the high seas and navigable by seagoing
vessels.  Such special rules shall conform as closely as possible to these
rules."

So - quite possibly someone in the Charles Navigation authority has decided
that rowing boats, given the volume of them, or their speed, has decided
that they have to show port and starboard side lights and a stern light.

Similarly, the Port of London Authority has issued a special rule for rowing
boats on the tidal thames:-
To take effect from January 2001 on the River Thames

Vessels under Oars: Persons in charge of vessels navigating under oars are
reminded that compliance with the Rule 25 of the International Regulations
for Preventing Collisions at Sea is mandatory on the tidal Thames.

Therefore rowing vessels and canoes under 7 metres in length should, as a
minimum, have at hand a torch or lantern capable of exhibiting a white light
in sufficient time to prevent collision.

In practice, in areas where such vessels may be numerous, vessels under oars
can only comply with the above requirement by displaying a continuous white
light visible over an arc of 360 degrees (an all-round white light). In
certain vessels two lights, one forward and one aft, may be required to
ensure visibility throughout 360 degrees.

Coaching Boats: Power Driven Boats used for coaching should, as a minimum,
display an all-round white light and port and starboard navigation lights.

==
So - the UK 'standard' for rowing boat lighting, if such as thing can be
said to exist, has become two white lights, visible through 180 degrees
each, at the bow and stern, because of that special rule.

Conor

 
 
 

Built in lights for boats.

Post by ehrl.. » Wed, 27 Mar 2002 06:18:57


Quote:



>> >A bracket that clips into an Empacher slot (which you can secure using a
>> >small***or nut and bolt) would probably do the job.  Fixing an extra
>> >Empacher slot at the stern shouldn't be too taxing either.

>> At my current club, we use this system with all boats.

>You don't have any photos you could show us do you?  I'd be very interested
>to see them.

No, sorry.  But it is a pretty simple contraption, really.  Empacher bow
clips are pretty standard these days.  Take a metal plate the width of a
bow number and tape lights to it.  If you want to make sure the weight of
the lights does not cause the plate to fall out, drill a small***hole
at the base of the metal plate to correspond with the***holes on the
bow clip.

We use very bright batter-powered hallogen lights - one on each side of
the metal plate - and wrap them individually in a clear plastic baggie to
make sure the water stays out.  After practice, we unscrew the plate and
leave the contraption in our boathouse storage room, and take out the
batteries to put them on the charger (extra non-chargeable batteries are
also stored there, just in case)  We wrap the plastic bag around the light
in a way that does not require us to remove them from the bags to take the
batteries out.

Not sure that's a good explanation, but I don't normally take photos of
random things lying around the boathouse.  And if I did, it usually takes
me about a year to get through a roll of film, so you'd have to wait a
while.

Charles Ehrlich
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