Rules, rules

Rules, rules

Post by david.hender.. » Thu, 12 May 2005 20:50:23


The Rules of Racing in my national federation have always had a
mythical status; you will never actually see them but people are always
telling you that you can't do this or you must do that, mostly stuff
you would never believe anyone would actually write into a rule-book.

So when I stumbled across The Rules recently, I was keen to see if what
I had heard could actually be true.  Here are some choice examples (any
errors in translation are entirely my own).

Coxswains:  males may not cox female crews and vice-versa, except in
veteran events and events in which no foreign crew is entered (?)

Veterans:  anyone having rowed (in a side-by-side event) at senior may
not compete at veteran in the same season - and vice-versa.  I could
see that one going down well with some of the UK pot-hunters.

Dress code (I love this):  crews must be uniformly dressed.  T-shirts
may be worn under singlet/all-in-one, but if one crew member wears one,
all must do so.  Such crews may not have a mix of long- and
short-sleeved T-shirts.
(I love this even more):  a rower may wear a cap/hat.  However, if more
than one member of a crew wears such an item, they must be identical.

And here's the blockbuster:  the Rules can only be changed during the
first year of each Olympiad.  Yes, I know that's this year, but you
should see the bureaucratic process involved. I guess it would take
eigh*** months just to get a proposal on the agenda.  Still, there's
always 2009...

Anyone else enjoy similar regulatory, er, protection of their
interests?

Dave H
Royal Sport Nautique de Bruxelles

 
 
 

Rules, rules

Post by andy.ni.. » Thu, 12 May 2005 22:40:21

Quote:

> The Rules of Racing in my national federation have always had a
> mythical status; you will never actually see them but people are
always
> telling you that you can't do this or you must do that, mostly stuff
> you would never believe anyone would actually write into a rule-book.

> So when I stumbled across The Rules recently, I was keen to see if
what
> I had heard could actually be true.  Here are some choice examples
(any
> errors in translation are entirely my own).

> Coxswains:  males may not cox female crews and vice-versa, except in
> veteran events and events in which no foreign crew is entered (?)

> Veterans:  anyone having rowed (in a side-by-side event) at senior
may
> not compete at veteran in the same season - and vice-versa.  I could
> see that one going down well with some of the UK pot-hunters.

> Dress code (I love this):  crews must be uniformly dressed.  T-shirts
> may be worn under singlet/all-in-one, but if one crew member wears
one,
> all must do so.  Such crews may not have a mix of long- and
> short-sleeved T-shirts.
> (I love this even more):  a rower may wear a cap/hat.  However, if
more
> than one member of a crew wears such an item, they must be identical.

> And here's the blockbuster:  the Rules can only be changed during the
> first year of each Olympiad.  Yes, I know that's this year, but you
> should see the bureaucratic process involved. I guess it would take
> eigh*** months just to get a proposal on the agenda.  Still, there's
> always 2009...

> Anyone else enjoy similar regulatory, er, protection of their
> interests?

> Dave H
> Royal Sport Nautique de Bruxelles

If they made a rule that prevented umpires from wearing blazers it
would solve a lot of problems...

If you organise regattas, please NEVER EVER allow umpires to wear a
blazer!

 
 
 

Rules, rules

Post by Jon Anderso » Thu, 12 May 2005 22:44:39

Quote:

> If you organise regattas, please NEVER EVER allow umpires to wear a
> blazer!

Not even nondescript blue ones?

Jon
--


    [ All views expressed are personal unless otherwise stated ]

 
 
 

Rules, rules

Post by chris harriso » Thu, 12 May 2005 23:08:30

Quote:

> If they made a rule that prevented umpires from wearing blazers it
> would solve a lot of problems...

> If you organise regattas, please NEVER EVER allow umpires to wear a
> blazer!

What have you against the blazer?

While the word 'blazer' has become synonymous with a jobs-worth
mentality I shouldn't necessarily always want to agree with you on this
one, I'm afraid.

Having umpires in blazers, or at least on hotter days in shirt (and tie
for the gents) achieves several endpoints; most notably setting them
apart from normal punters, coaches and supporters but also the collar
and tie still confers a semblance of authority, even in the 21st Century.

It's a de facto uniform, making the umpire recognisable as an official
of the event. Unless the ARA mandate a range of sweatshirts with UMPIRE
emblazoned across the back (which I would imagine would be met with
significant resistance) it's an easy, cost-effective means of setting
the umpire apart.

 
 
 

Rules, rules

Post by Douglas MacFarlan » Thu, 12 May 2005 23:45:13



Quote:


>> If they made a rule that prevented umpires from wearing blazers it
>> would solve a lot of problems...

>> If you organise regattas, please NEVER EVER allow umpires to wear a
>> blazer!

>What have you against the blazer?

>While the word 'blazer' has become synonymous with a jobs-worth
>mentality I shouldn't necessarily always want to agree with you on this
>one, I'm afraid.

>Having umpires in blazers, or at least on hotter days in shirt (and tie
>for the gents) achieves several endpoints; most notably setting them
>apart from normal punters, coaches and supporters but also the collar
>and tie still confers a semblance of authority, even in the 21st Century.

>It's a de facto uniform, making the umpire recognisable as an official
>of the event. Unless the ARA mandate a range of sweatshirts with UMPIRE
>emblazoned across the back (which I would imagine would be met with
>significant resistance) it's an easy, cost-effective means of setting
>the umpire apart.

Perhaps it's the weather up here, but the standard uniform for umpires used
to be a distinctive colour of rain jacket. It probably still is, but I
don't race enough these days to know if they all still wear them.

Cheers,

Douglas

 
 
 

Rules, rules

Post by carolin.. » Fri, 13 May 2005 00:16:02

There's something to be said for only changing the rules every four
years. The ARA change the rules so often it's hard to keep up with
them.

Personally I don't find a blazer particularly flattering, especially
once I've filled the pockets with my purse, car keys, binoculars, rules
booklet, pens, mobile phone, sunglasses, sandwiches etc.etc.  But you
do have to have some sort of uniform to identify officials.   I draw
the line at wearing a tie, though I know at least one lady umpire who
wears one.

An alternative might be a coloured tabard with UMPIRE on it which would
go over whatever one was wearing, which would solve the problem of
blazers being too hot in summer and not warm enough in winter.

Caroline

 
 
 

Rules, rules

Post by James Elde » Fri, 13 May 2005 01:16:24

I may be wrong, but has some of this come about from wanting to be in
step with FISA rules?  Perhaps because of being a smaller country with
lots of neighbours? i.e. there's an expectation of regular attendance
from foreign crews.

Quote:
> Coxswains:  males may not cox female crews and vice-versa, except in
> veteran events and events in which no foreign crew is entered (?)

This is not enforced at Ghent - but if it were it would make a degree
of sense at a quasi-international regatta, as it would align with the
FISA/IOC rule (the fact that the international rule is IMHO unfair and
misguided is another story)

Quote:
> Dress code (I love this):  crews must be uniformly dressed.  T-shirts
> may be worn under singlet/all-in-one, but if one crew member wears
one,
> all must do so.  Such crews may not have a mix of long- and
> short-sleeved T-shirts.
> (I love this even more):  a rower may wear a cap/hat.  However, if
more
> than one member of a crew wears such an item, they must be identical.

This has sometimes been vigorously enforced at Ghent - we always flag
it up to people before they race there for the first time and remind
them that they'll need matching T-shirts under lycras, one type of hat
etc.  Again, it's a FISA rule.

Quote:
> And here's the blockbuster:  the Rules can only be changed during the
> first year of each Olympiad.  Yes, I know that's this year, but you
> should see the bureaucratic process involved. I guess it would take
> eigh*** months just to get a proposal on the agenda.  Still, there's
> always 2009...

Again, presumably to align with the FISA timetable for rule changes.

All a bit bizarre I'll agree, but I would imagine that this is the
method in the madness.

 
 
 

Rules, rules

Post by Christopher Anto » Fri, 13 May 2005 01:47:39

These look pretty much to me as they have been slightly adapted
word-for-word from the FISA rules.

Certainly in FISA events men may only cox men's boats and vice-versa (except
veterans); all the crew have to be uniformly dressed down to the socks;
rules are only changed in the year after an olympic games; the side-by-side
rule though seems to be universally Belgian.

As an umpire you get flack for ticking off crews for not being universally
dressed. It is not however a minor thing you'd never see a footbal or rugby
team compete in mixed kit or kit for a club they used to belong to years ago
even down to the humblest level of competition and certainly not in national
level events. Personally I think we're too lenient and it doesn't show
rowing in a good image.

 
 
 

Rules, rules

Post by liz » Fri, 13 May 2005 02:37:15

no, no no....  that's like cutting off samson's hair - we'll never let you
get away with it...

;-)


Quote:

> If you organise regattas, please NEVER EVER allow umpires to wear a
> blazer!

 
 
 

Rules, rules

Post by Charles Huthmake » Fri, 13 May 2005 07:05:08

Quote:
>> Dress code (I love this):  crews must be uniformly dressed.  T-shirts
>> may be worn under singlet/all-in-one, but if one crew member wears
> one,
>> all must do so.  Such crews may not have a mix of long- and
>> short-sleeved T-shirts.
>> (I love this even more):  a rower may wear a cap/hat.  However, if
> more
>> than one member of a crew wears such an item, they must be identical.

Maybe I am mistaken but I thought FISA did away with the identical hat rule
a couple years ago.

I do know that you may choose to NOT wear a hat even if someone else in the
crew is wearing one.

Charles

 
 
 

Rules, rules

Post by Jon Anderso » Fri, 13 May 2005 07:27:24

Quote:

> You're not alone in feeling that way Christopher.  I'd also like to
> see clubs register their kit and blade designs (not just the colours),
> and *not* go changing them from year to year.

If we find our suppliers for kit are ***we will want to change them.
Our club colours never really change but our kit has changed a lot in
style in recent years. Registering kit would cause us a great deal of
hassle, especially if a supplier got an order wrong.

Jon
--


    [ All views expressed are personal unless otherwise stated ]

 
 
 

Rules, rules

Post by Christopher Anto » Fri, 13 May 2005 07:38:10

Quote:

> Maybe I am mistaken but I thought FISA did away with the identical hat
> rule a couple years ago.

From the 2005 rules

Rule 42 - Rowers' clothing and blade colours

a) International regattas - members of the same crew shall compete wearing
identical clothing in design and colours (racing uniform and any additional
garments). If any member of a crew wear (sic) headgear, then the headgear
worn by those crew members shall be identical.

i.e. you don't have to wear a hat, but if you do they all have to be
identical.

 
 
 

Rules, rules

Post by mprus.. » Fri, 13 May 2005 08:02:18

Quote:


> > You're not alone in feeling that way Christopher.  I'd also like to
> > see clubs register their kit and blade designs (not just the
colours),
> > and *not* go changing them from year to year.

I'm away from home this week and having to use Google Groups rather
than my ISP's news server: has Richard got "X-No-Archive: yes" set in
his headers as all I see are replies to his postings?

Of course, if he does and he replies to this, I consequently won't see
it :)