Restoring trophy blades

Restoring trophy blades

Post by James Elde » Sat, 21 May 2011 19:39:50


Has anyone had any experience getting aged trophy blades restored, e.g
where the varnish has decayed and left the original signwriting nearly
illegible?  I'm after either recommendations of conservators or, if
appropriate, methods for undertaking some restoration work myself.

Thames RC is having a major clubhouse rebuild/refurbishment this
summer and this means that everything has come off the walls,
presenting an opportunity to get some of the damage to paintings,
photos and trophy blades seen to (inasmuch as cost allows).

A while ago I did ask the chap (whose name temporarily escapes me) who
does trophy blades and signwriting for the likes of Leander whether he
also did repairs - he does, but it's not really his core business and
I got the impression that it wasn't necessarily something he was so
keen to take on.

Any ideas?  I will crosspost to the River and Rowing Museum board when
I can find my log-on details.

Likewise I would appreciate recommendations for good photograph,
paper, and art conservators convenient for Putney.  Rachel Wragg at
the R&RM has helpfully given me details of who they use but as they
tend to be Oxford-based, it would be good to find some people slightly
closer to the clubhouse.

Incidentally, given that Thames RC is de facto a public building on
Head days etc, and most of the UK rowing population (and many from
overseas) will end up in our bar at some point, people may be
interested in the progress of our building works.  We have started a
blog: thamesrc.tumblr.com

We've only posted plans, architects' impressions and 'before' pictures
so far, but photos of the first week's work should go up tonight or
this weekend.  Several walls have gone already!

 
 
 

Restoring trophy blades

Post by AJ » Sat, 21 May 2011 21:03:26


Quote:
> Has anyone had any experience getting aged trophy blades restored, e.g
> where the varnish has decayed and left the original signwriting nearly
> illegible? ?I'm after either recommendations of conservators or, if
> appropriate, methods for undertaking some restoration work myself.

> Thames RC is having a major clubhouse rebuild/refurbishment this
> summer and this means that everything has come off the walls,
> presenting an opportunity to get some of the damage to paintings,
> photos and trophy blades seen to (inasmuch as cost allows).

> A while ago I did ask the chap (whose name temporarily escapes me) who
> does trophy blades and signwriting for the likes of Leander whether he
> also did repairs - he does, but it's not really his core business and
> I got the impression that it wasn't necessarily something he was so
> keen to take on.

> Any ideas? ?I will crosspost to the River and Rowing Museum board when
> I can find my log-on details.

> Likewise I would appreciate recommendations for good photograph,
> paper, and art conservators convenient for Putney. ?Rachel Wragg at
> the R&RM has helpfully given me details of who they use but as they
> tend to be Oxford-based, it would be good to find some people slightly
> closer to the clubhouse.

> Incidentally, given that Thames RC is de facto a public building on
> Head days etc, and most of the UK rowing population (and many from
> overseas) will end up in our bar at some point, people may be
> interested in the progress of our building works. ?We have started a
> blog: thamesrc.tumblr.com

> We've only posted plans, architects' impressions and 'before' pictures
> so far, but photos of the first week's work should go up tonight or
> this weekend. ?Several walls have gone already!

You could try one of the auction houses - eg Bonhams, Phillips,
Christies in South Kensington to see if they have contacts they could
give you.

It's a good opportunity also to establish a full digital library of
your photographs and paintings and put them on the website.

Look forward to seeing the progress. You should also start a
photojournal of the works as they go along.

aj

 
 
 

Restoring trophy blades

Post by AJ » Sat, 21 May 2011 21:33:53


Quote:

> > Has anyone had any experience getting aged trophy blades restored, e.g
> > where the varnish has decayed and left the original signwriting nearly
> > illegible? ?I'm after either recommendations of conservators or, if
> > appropriate, methods for undertaking some restoration work myself.

> > Thames RC is having a major clubhouse rebuild/refurbishment this
> > summer and this means that everything has come off the walls,
> > presenting an opportunity to get some of the damage to paintings,
> > photos and trophy blades seen to (inasmuch as cost allows).

> > A while ago I did ask the chap (whose name temporarily escapes me) who
> > does trophy blades and signwriting for the likes of Leander whether he
> > also did repairs - he does, but it's not really his core business and
> > I got the impression that it wasn't necessarily something he was so
> > keen to take on.

> > Any ideas? ?I will crosspost to the River and Rowing Museum board when
> > I can find my log-on details.

> > Likewise I would appreciate recommendations for good photograph,
> > paper, and art conservators convenient for Putney. ?Rachel Wragg at
> > the R&RM has helpfully given me details of who they use but as they
> > tend to be Oxford-based, it would be good to find some people slightly
> > closer to the clubhouse.

> > Incidentally, given that Thames RC is de facto a public building on
> > Head days etc, and most of the UK rowing population (and many from
> > overseas) will end up in our bar at some point, people may be
> > interested in the progress of our building works. ?We have started a
> > blog: thamesrc.tumblr.com

> > We've only posted plans, architects' impressions and 'before' pictures
> > so far, but photos of the first week's work should go up tonight or
> > this weekend. ?Several walls have gone already!

> You could try one of the auction houses - eg Bonhams, Phillips,
> Christies in South Kensington to see if they have contacts they could
> give you.

> It's a good opportunity also to establish a full digital library of
> your photographs and paintings and put them on the website.

> Look forward to seeing the progress. You should also start a
> photojournal of the works as they go along.

> aj- Hide quoted text -

> - Show quoted text -

Sorry - should have engaged brain before pressing send. You already
are doing the journal.

 
 
 

Restoring trophy blades

Post by usbri » Sat, 21 May 2011 21:38:03

Quote:

> Likewise I would appreciate recommendations for good photograph,
> paper, and art conservators convenient for Putney. ?

James

I know someone who may be able to give you a steer on renovating old
photos
(you know this person too but I think you havent made the connection)
 please email me directly for details

 
 
 

Restoring trophy blades

Post by James Elde » Sat, 21 May 2011 22:05:07


Quote:

> > Has anyone had any experience getting aged trophy blades restored, e.g
> > where the varnish has decayed and left the original signwriting nearly
> > illegible? ?I'm after either recommendations of conservators or, if
> > appropriate, methods for undertaking some restoration work myself.

> > Thames RC is having a major clubhouse rebuild/refurbishment this
> > summer and this means that everything has come off the walls,
> > presenting an opportunity to get some of the damage to paintings,
> > photos and trophy blades seen to (inasmuch as cost allows).

> > A while ago I did ask the chap (whose name temporarily escapes me) who
> > does trophy blades and signwriting for the likes of Leander whether he
> > also did repairs - he does, but it's not really his core business and
> > I got the impression that it wasn't necessarily something he was so
> > keen to take on.

> > Any ideas? ?I will crosspost to the River and Rowing Museum board when
> > I can find my log-on details.

> > Likewise I would appreciate recommendations for good photograph,
> > paper, and art conservators convenient for Putney. ?Rachel Wragg at
> > the R&RM has helpfully given me details of who they use but as they
> > tend to be Oxford-based, it would be good to find some people slightly
> > closer to the clubhouse.

> > Incidentally, given that Thames RC is de facto a public building on
> > Head days etc, and most of the UK rowing population (and many from
> > overseas) will end up in our bar at some point, people may be
> > interested in the progress of our building works. ?We have started a
> > blog: thamesrc.tumblr.com

> > We've only posted plans, architects' impressions and 'before' pictures
> > so far, but photos of the first week's work should go up tonight or
> > this weekend. ?Several walls have gone already!

> You could try one of the auction houses - eg Bonhams, Phillips,
> Christies in South Kensington to see if they have contacts they could
> give you.

> It's a good opportunity also to establish a full digital library of
> your photographs and paintings and put them on the website.

> Look forward to seeing the progress. You should also start a
> photojournal of the works as they go along.

> aj

Thanks.  Worth noting that we have already had some of our more
generally interesting paintings and photographs listed through the
Bridgeman Art Library for the purpose of buying prints etc:
http://www.bridgemanart.com/search/location/Thames-Rowing-Club-London...

A full digital archive of our collection is envisaged, but will be
quite a major undertaking.

 
 
 

Restoring trophy blades

Post by edga » Sun, 22 May 2011 07:13:31

Yes, I have a trophy blade which has been*** on my wall for very many
years. It was getting a bit shabby so I restored it to its former glory.
  As a restoration project there is no essential difference between a trophy
blade and an oil painting except that the blade will have been coated with
boat varnish which will be very hard to remove without damaging the
underlying inscription so you may have to resort to just a light rubbing
down to clean up the surface and then do your restoration on top of that..
Use artists oil colour rather than acrylic and before you start varnish the
rubbed down surface with picture varnish to make it shine because you cannot
match colours accurately if you try to put shiny wet paint onto a dull
surface you have rubbed down.
You need  someone who knows how to restore oil paintings and can match paint
colours accurately especially if your blade has any elaborate designs on it.
 After I had redone my oar I protected my restoration work by revarnishing
the blade with picture varnish which is easy to remove in future with
acetone/white spirit if further attention is ever required but I did the
shaft with boat varnish in the usual way.
Hope this helps.
Edgar


Quote:
> Has anyone had any experience getting aged trophy blades restored, e.g
> where the varnish has decayed and left the original signwriting nearly
> illegible?  I'm after either recommendations of conservators or, if
> appropriate, methods for undertaking some restoration work myself.

> Thames RC is having a major clubhouse rebuild/refurbishment this
> summer and this means that everything has come off the walls,
> snipped<

 
 
 

Restoring trophy blades

Post by James Elde » Sun, 22 May 2011 22:41:15


Quote:
> Yes, I have a trophy blade which has been*** on my wall for very many
> years. It was getting a bit shabby so I restored it to its former glory.
> ? As a restoration project there is no essential difference between a trophy
> blade and an oil painting except that the blade will have been coated with
> boat varnish which will be very hard to remove without damaging the
> underlying inscription so you may have to resort to just a light rubbing
> down to clean up the surface and then do your restoration on top of that..
> Use artists oil colour rather than acrylic and before you start varnish the
> rubbed down surface with picture varnish to make it shine because you cannot
> match colours accurately if you try to put shiny wet paint onto a dull
> surface you have rubbed down.
> You need ?someone who knows how to restore oil paintings and can match paint
> colours accurately especially if your blade has any elaborate designs on it.
> ?After I had redone my oar I protected my restoration work by revarnishing
> the blade with picture varnish which is easy to remove in future with
> acetone/white spirit if further attention is ever required but I did the
> shaft with boat varnish in the usual way.
> Hope this helps.
> Edgar

Thanks Edgar, all good stuff.
 
 
 

Restoring trophy blades

Post by William Clar » Sun, 22 May 2011 23:31:22


Quote:

> Yes, I have a trophy blade which has been*** on my wall for very many
> years. It was getting a bit shabby so I restored it to its former glory.
>   As a restoration project there is no essential difference between a trophy
> blade and an oil painting except that the blade will have been coated with
> boat varnish which will be very hard to remove without damaging the
> underlying inscription so you may have to resort to just a light rubbing
> down to clean up the surface and then do your restoration on top of that..
> Use artists oil colour rather than acrylic and before you start varnish the
> rubbed down surface with picture varnish to make it shine because you cannot
> match colours accurately if you try to put shiny wet paint onto a dull
> surface you have rubbed down.
> You need  someone who knows how to restore oil paintings and can match paint
> colours accurately especially if your blade has any elaborate designs on it.
>  After I had redone my oar I protected my restoration work by revarnishing
> the blade with picture varnish which is easy to remove in future with
> acetone/white spirit if further attention is ever required but I did the
> shaft with boat varnish in the usual way.
> Hope this helps.
> Edgar



> > Has anyone had any experience getting aged trophy blades restored, e.g
> > where the varnish has decayed and left the original signwriting nearly
> > illegible?  I'm after either recommendations of conservators or, if
> > appropriate, methods for undertaking some restoration work myself.

> > Thames RC is having a major clubhouse rebuild/refurbishment this
> > summer and this means that everything has come off the walls,
> > snipped<

Interesting - I have two of my Father's blades from Teddy Hall, ca.
1935, and they could certainly do with a re-finish. I appreciate the
benefit of your experience.
 
 
 

Restoring trophy blades

Post by edga » Mon, 23 May 2011 03:08:58



Quote:
> Yes, I have a trophy blade which has been*** on my wall for very many
> years. It was getting a bit shabby so I restored it to its former glory.
> As a restoration project there is no essential difference between a trophy
> blade and an oil painting except that the blade will have been coated with
> boat varnish which will be very hard to remove without damaging the
> underlying inscription so you may have to resort to just a light rubbing
> down to clean up the surface and then do your restoration on top of that..
> Use artists oil colour rather than acrylic and before you start varnish
> the
> rubbed down surface with picture varnish to make it shine because you
> cannot
> match colours accurately if you try to put shiny wet paint onto a dull
> surface you have rubbed down.
> You need someone who knows how to restore oil paintings and can match
> paint
> colours accurately especially if your blade has any elaborate designs on
> it.
> After I had redone my oar I protected my restoration work by revarnishing
> the blade with picture varnish which is easy to remove in future with
> acetone/white spirit if further attention is ever required but I did the
> shaft with boat varnish in the usual way.
> Hope this helps.
> Edgar

Thanks Edgar, all good stuff.

Thanks
. I forgot to mention that you should add a spot of Liquin to the artists
oil colours. This speeds up drying times and lets you get on with the next
stage quicker.
Edgar