Hard and Deep

Hard and Deep

Post by Ryan Drek » Thu, 18 May 2000 04:00:00


Problem:  I have a very hard catch, especially when I sprint at the end
of a piece, and dig my blade in very deep.  I row a single, and have no
coach, so what are some good ways to help fix this?

My pitch is 6 degrees in both oarlocks.

 
 
 

Hard and Deep

Post by MKami132 » Thu, 18 May 2000 04:00:00

Try thinking about pulling with technique instead of power. Quick - light -
sharp

 
 
 

Hard and Deep

Post by Sue Thoma » Thu, 18 May 2000 04:00:00

It's possible that you are opening up with your back at the catch, which can
cause the blades to go deep because as the shoulders rise the blades go
down.  As you sprint, you might tend to open up harder with your backwhen
you apply the pressure.  Be sure you are applying power with the legs, not
the back.  A drill we use to work on -- keep your arms straight, apply power
with the legs, maintain the catch angle with your back -- for the whole
stroke.  It's awkward to extract the blades with your arms straight, but the
drill is effective.  The next step is the same drill, but swing your body to
the proper finish angle, still keep the arms straight.  Then move to a full
stroke, trying to keep the same feeling with your legs.

For the hard catch, practice taking catches at 10-25% power then increasing
power to 100% at the finish.  Then move to 50% power at the catch to 100% at
the finish.  As one of my coaches said to me, "Be more ladylike at the
catch".  I just about decked him for that comment, but he was right.  I was
applying far too much power at the catch, which can cause the boat to
decelerate very quickly.  Think about your first stroke from a standstill --
if you apply too much power at the start the boat goes backwards -- there is
the same effect when you are underway!

Prepare yourself while on the recovery, so when you are at the catch you can
simply let the oars drop into the water before you pull.  The oars know
where they should be floating -- let them do that.  And simply pull straight
back, as if you are pulling the oar handles flat across a table.  Someone
once likened it to pulling a glass of beer across the table.  "Knees, navel,
***s" -- think of taking the oar handle through that line -- for some
reason it works for me.

And of course, relax!  Trying too hard makes it worse.
...........
sue

Quote:

>Problem:  I have a very hard catch, especially when I sprint at the end
>of a piece, and dig my blade in very deep.  I row a single, and have no
>coach, so what are some good ways to help fix this?

>My pitch is 6 degrees in both oarlocks.


 
 
 

Hard and Deep

Post by Andreas Fischbac » Fri, 19 May 2000 04:00:00

Ryan Dreke schrieb:

Quote:
> Problem:  I have a very hard catch, especially when I sprint at the end
> of a piece, and dig my blade in very deep.  I row a single, and have no
> coach, so what are some good ways to help fix this?

> My pitch is 6 degrees in both oarlocks.

In my opinion you should have the feeling, that you not raise your hand's
over your knees, but just try to pull the scull's or the oar in a heigt
which is about 10 cm lower than your knees in the catch. train this with
low power and later try it with more power.
And make sure, that you have your arm long stretched. Don't bend your arms
to early, becauseyou can't be flexible to get the right heigt of the
blades. Don't borrow, it would be a hard piece of work to change this.

Greetings from germany,
Andreas

 
 
 

Hard and Deep

Post by Tim Grang » Fri, 19 May 2000 04:00:00


Quote:

>Prepare yourself while on the recovery, so when you are at the catch you can
>simply let the oars drop into the water before you pull.  The oars know
>where they should be floating -- let them do that.  And simply pull straight
>back, as if you are pulling the oar handles flat across a table.  Someone
>once likened it to pulling a glass of beer across the table.  "Knees, navel,
>***s" -- think of taking the oar handle through that line -- for some
>reason it works for me.

A good exercise that I do sometimes is to try and scull with your blades
only half buried, so that half the spoon is out of the water.  It's very
difficuilt, and you'll probably find that usually when you try you end up
just covering the spoons; it gives you a great feel for how sensitive you
have got to be at the catch.

Tim

 
 
 

Hard and Deep

Post by Dean L Nea » Fri, 19 May 2000 04:00:00

Well as a Rowing newbie I recently was told I had the same problem whilst
rowing in an 8.
But then one day my coach had this pearl of wisdom:
He basically told me to completely let go of the oar when it was in catch
position whilst everyone else was rowing! I thought he was mad and that the
oar would go all over the place, but instead the oar hit the water and did a
PERFECT stroke with blade in perfect depth! The point is that you should not
put any force as such in the stroke movement that causes the oar to dig in.
Keep your hands parrellel to the gunnels throughout the stroke. This little
exercise showed to me CLEARLY that the oar blade knows where to go almost so
just concentrate on assisting it's natural movement!

Dean Neal....

Quote:
> Problem:  I have a very hard catch, especially when I sprint at the end
> of a piece, and dig my blade in very deep.  I row a single, and have no
> coach, so what are some good ways to help fix this?

> My pitch is 6 degrees in both oarlocks.

 
 
 

Hard and Deep

Post by Jo » Tue, 23 May 2000 04:00:00

Quote:

>Problem:  I have a very hard catch, especially when I sprint at the end
>of a piece, and dig my blade in very deep.  I row a single, and have no
>coach, so what are some good ways to help fix this?

>My pitch is 6 degrees in both oarlocks.

I also had a problem with digging deep at the catch.  Since the object
is to pull the oar in the most linear fashion, and I was letting it
:bow" up through the stroke, I found that if I pull and try to make it
"dip" as I pull, my mental mindset would help me compensate and I
would end up with a straighter pull.

Joe

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