scull steering

scull steering

Post by j howel » Tue, 05 Mar 1996 04:00:00


any advice on changing direction in a scull? i'm a novice at it but it
seems that a long pointy boat designed to move quickly in one direction
doesn't take kindly to a change in direction, irrespective of whether
you're heading for the bank or bridge. i row on a very twisty river and
need to turn thro' 90deg within 10-20 strokes so just a gradual increase
in pressure on one scull won't work, i've found that a big difference in
pressure at the catch (especially if i'm stretched right out) will create
the greatest turning effect, but predictably this***s up the set of the
boat the greatest as well, is it just a trade off between turning and
keeping the run on the boat? the boat i use is also a bit light for me do
you think this makes a difference?
help needed before i trash a boat/get overtaken by fixed seat rowers/dead
ducks and panty liners
 
 
 

scull steering

Post by Sullys Ma » Thu, 07 Mar 1996 04:00:00


Quote:

>any advice on changing direction in a scull? i'm a novice at it but it
>seems that a long pointy boat designed to move quickly in one direction
>doesn't take kindly to a change in direction, irrespective of whether
>you're heading for the bank or bridge. i row on a very twisty river and
>need to turn thro' 90deg within 10-20 strokes so just a gradual increase
>in pressure on one scull won't work, i've found that a big difference in
>pressure at the catch (especially if i'm stretched right out) will create
>the greatest turning effect, but predictably this***s up the set of the
>boat the greatest as well, is it just a trade off between turning and
>keeping the run on the boat? the boat i use is also a bit light for me do
>you think this makes a difference?
>help needed before i trash a boat/get overtaken by fixed seat rowers/dead
>ducks and panty liners

On the model C, change the settings to....  umm..   oh!  a ROWING
question.

If you are making more gradual turns, a nice trick is to push harder
on one footboard.  IE: if you need to move to starboard, emphasize
the drive on your portside footboard.  This magically translates
into a little more pressure on your port blade with less disturbance
of your swing and rhythm.  By pulling harder with your port arm,
you may end up muscling the boat for a while after the turn.

For an extreme turn, go for extra length at the catch on one side
and shorten the other, again emphasizing the push with the foot.
concentrate on releasing right together, this will keep you balanced
through the turn.

Yes, it is possible to handle doglegs and twisty rivers cleanly and
smoothly, it's a fine sculler that does so.

Mike Sullivan