Lockout Phone Numbers

Lockout Phone Numbers

Post by Paul_Andres » Sat, 24 Feb 1990 04:58:17


Kent Ostby called me this morning with phone numbers for the player's
association and commissioners's office. Since his news feed is screwed up,
he asked me to post these, so I am.

Players association: (212)-826-0808

Commissioners office: (212)-371-7800 [be sure to ask for Public Relations]

Come on out there! Flood those phone lines. Make the voice of the fan matter.
In the minds of the people running baseball, each phone call or letter
represents hundreds or thousands of people. Public pressure can make a
difference.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                 "Throw strikes. Babe Ruth is dead."


home: 3006 NW McKinley    Corvallis, OR 97330         (503)-752-8424
                        A SABR member since 1979                

 
 
 

Lockout Phone Numbers

Post by David M Ta » Sat, 24 Feb 1990 12:48:31

Quote:

>Players association: (212)-826-0808

>Commissioners office: (212)-371-7800 [be sure to ask for Public Relations]

Sounds good to me.

On a similar topic:  it seems to me that what the fans need is a lever.  The
players and management both know that we're not going to give up baseball just
because they squabble for a while.  We're ***ed, and they know it.  What we
need is a way to hit them without giving up the game.

The first thing that springs to mind is a boycott of all products sold at the
park or advertised on televised games.  Let's think this one through.

Suppose, for argument's sake, that such a boycott were implemented, and were
widespread enough to have an effect.  What would that effect be?  Corporate
sponsors for televised baseball would run away to venues where they wouldn't
be throwing their money away.  This hits the networks who televise the games.
They would have to reduce the offered contract for cable/free TV broadcast
rights.  In theory, at least, this then hits management, who in turn reduce
player profits (especially if revenue-sharing gets in).

Problems:  the TV contracts run at least one year ahead of reality, maybe more.
I'm not sure of the precise numbers, but the gist is that action now would not
be felt for a couple of years at least, by which time the boycott will have
fizzled due to the Great American Attention Span.  Also, the cable companies
have captive audiences, since they are local monopolies, and are unboycottable
in practice.  One could boycott people who advertise on ESPN, but do outfits
like Madison Square Garden and Home Team Sports use corporate sponsors?

So, even a well-organized and effective boycott of sponsors doesn't look like
it would bring to bear the pressure we want, i.e. on the owners and players.
Anyone else have suggestions?

--
        David M. Tate       | "It made the basses of their being throb in    

                            |  pizzicati of Hosanna..."
 "A Man for all Seasonings" |                     -- Wallace Stevens

 
 
 

Lockout Phone Numbers

Post by Scott Barm » Tue, 27 Feb 1990 10:50:05

Quote:

>Kent Ostby called me this morning with phone numbers for the player's
> . . .
>Come on out there! Flood those phone lines. Make the voice of the fan matter.
>In the minds of the people running baseball, each phone call or letter
>represents hundreds or thousands of people. Public pressure can make a
>difference.

With what?
Will it get more baseball on over-the-air TV?  NO!
Will it stop baseball from eventually becomming a pay-per-view event?  NO!
Will it reduce the prices of concessions, tickets, and parking?  NO!
Will it get more security in the ballparks to prevent drunks from disrupting
        your enjoyment of a game?  NO!
Will it do anything more than add to the coffers of the long distance
        telephone carriers (or to NY Tel here in New York)?  NO!

The only way it will change is to stop watching baseball on TV (including
cable), stop patronizing known TV sponsors, stop going to games, and stop
buying licensed souveniers!  Once you do that, then tell the owner of your
local team why you and others like you are no longer patronizing the team
and then something will be done.

Geez... I have to sound cynical, but this is the reality!  If you keep
padding their bank accounts, they will continue to go on the course they
have been going.  MONEY is the key... stop paying and they have nothing
to argue about!

--
scott barman

uucp:     {philabs, ge-dab, crdgw1}!nbc1!scott

 
 
 

Lockout Phone Numbers

Post by Paul_Andres » Thu, 01 Mar 1990 05:15:23

In response to my exhortation for people to call to put pressure on the factions

[some cynicism deleted]

Quote:
>The only way it will change is to stop watching baseball on TV (including
>cable), stop patronizing known TV sponsors, stop going to games, and stop
>buying licensed souveniers!  Once you do that, then tell the owner of your
>local team why you and others like you are no longer patronizing the team
>and then something will be done.
>Geez... I have to sound cynical, but this is the reality!  If you keep
>padding their bank accounts, they will continue to go on the course they
>have been going.  MONEY is the key... stop paying and they have nothing
>to argue about!

Well, Scott, you'd be hard pressed to find anyone more cynical than I when
it comes to the big bucks of pro sports, but I think that we are arguing
two sides of the same coin here. First, I agree that TV is entirely too
much of the tail wagging the dog. Never mind the fact that baseball is probably
the worst sport around to cover with camera(s). Second, I agree absolutely
that revenue (or the lack of it) is the only thing that will catch the
attention of the moguls, and that is very much my point. In all of my phone
calls and letters, I have made the strongest possible point that none of
my personal funds will go to directly or indirectly support baseball, it's
sponsors or products. That my affections might be withdrawn doesn't mean a
tinker's damn to those folks.

The reason that organized baseball could care less about the fans is that
they know that we will come mindlessly back to the game like the sheep
that we are when everything has been settled. My efforts are aimed toward
trying to plant a seed of doubt in their tiny minds that fandom might
actually respond and put a significant dent in their precious pocket books.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                      "Play Ball, furchrissakes"


home: 3006 NW McKinley    Corvallis, OR 97330         (503)-752-8424
                        A SABR member since 1979                

 
 
 

Lockout Phone Numbers

Post by David M Ta » Thu, 01 Mar 1990 14:06:14


makes the following comment as an aside:

Quote:
>                                  Never mind the fact that baseball is probably
>the worst sport around to cover with camera(s).

I find this an interesting comment.  As much as I enjoy going to the game in
person, I have to admit that there are aspects of the game that I would have
almost zero appreciation of if it weren't for television.  The one that leaps
to mind immediately is the art of pitching.  Unless you sit right behind home
plate, and have better eyes than mine, it is nearly impossible to identify
what pitch was thrown, and where in/out of the strike zone it was.  On TV,
not only is this easy to see, but the telescopic effect of the center-field
camera actually exaggerates the break of the ball to the eye, making it easy
to see what was thrown.  If it weren't for TV and instant replay, there would
probably not be any controversy over the "neighborhood" play at second, to
give another example.

What you lose, of course, is the sense of the spaces of the game, and the
global view of the play.  I'm not convinced that this couldn't be overcome
with clever camera placement and good direction.  I used to think that soccer
was totally unsuitable for television, until I saw the BBC coverage of the
World Cup in Barcelona.  You just have to know when to show detail, and when
to show context.

Besides, half of the people in Candlestick Park couldn't see Kevin Mitchell's
barehanded catch, because he was tucked in the LF corner.  I saw it 27 times!
:-).

--
        David M. Tate       | "It made the basses of their being throb in    

                            |  pizzicati of Hosanna..."
 "A Man for all Seasonings" |                     -- Wallace Stevens

 
 
 

Lockout Phone Numbers

Post by v062j.. » Fri, 02 Mar 1990 02:55:44


Quote:

> Besides, half of the people in Candlestick Park couldn't see Kevin Mitchell's
> barehanded catch, because he was tucked in the LF corner.  I saw it 27 times

    It's only a small point but wasn't Mitchell's catch on the road? I think
it was in St. Louis.

                                                    COAL

 
 
 

Lockout Phone Numbers

Post by David Kirs » Fri, 02 Mar 1990 05:13:35


Quote:
>I find this an interesting comment.  As much as I enjoy going to the game in
>person, I have to admit that there are aspects of the game that I would have
>almost zero appreciation of if it weren't for television.  The one that leaps
>to mind immediately is the art of pitching.  Unless you sit right behind home
>plate, and have better eyes than mine, it is nearly impossible to identify
>what pitch was thrown, and where in/out of the strike zone it was.  On TV,
>not only is this easy to see, but the telescopic effect of the center-field
>camera actually exaggerates the break of the ball to the eye, making it easy
>to see what was thrown.  If it weren't for TV and instant replay, there would
>probably not be any controversy over the "neighborhood" play at second, to
>give another example.

>Besides, half of the people in Candlestick Park couldn't see Kevin Mitchell's
>barehanded catch, because he was tucked in the LF corner.  I saw it 27 times!

  Dave, I don't think anybody in Candlestick Park saw the catch that night..
cuz if I remember right it happened in Busch stadium in St. Louis. I believe
it was hit by Terry Pendleton of the Cards. Anyways, I'm positive it was on
Astroturf somewhere.. didn't he wind up going through a door down by the
bullpen or something - I don't think there are any doors in the left field
corner at Candlestick?

  Can someone else clarify or elaborate on this? After all, it was both POD and
POY (Play of the Day and Play of the Year) on CNN..surely, this will be a
popular trivia question someday. Flame me to death if I'm wrong, but...

Dave Kirsch
University of Minnesota

"Blue Jays all the way in '90"
"John Olerud - the draft steal of the decade">

 
 
 

Lockout Phone Numbers

Post by Bruce Hans » Sat, 03 Mar 1990 01:42:56

Quote:
> Geez... I have to sound cynical, but this is the reality!  If you keep
> padding their bank accounts, they will continue to go on the course they
> have been going.  MONEY is the key... stop paying and they have nothing
> to argue about!

Speaking of cynicism...

Is there anybody else out there who hopes this lockout drags on and on
just to teach those ***holes to stop getting into a labor dispute every
other year?

Think about it.  When was the last time there WASN'T a dispute going on?
When will it end?  Only after we lose an entire season of baseball will
they wake up to reality and settle for a paltry AVERAGE salary of under
$500,000.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
|Bruce Hansen  iconsys!ohs!bhan                    Disclaimers are for wimps|
|Darth Vader sleeps with a Teddywookie.                                     |
|Go Dodgers, Lakers, Cowboys, Flyers, Cougars, Hoosiers, etc.               |
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

 
 
 

Lockout Phone Numbers

Post by Paul_Andres » Sat, 03 Mar 1990 03:24:22

In response to my snide comment about lousy tv coverage of a baseball game,

Quote:
>I find this an interesting comment.  As much as I enjoy going to the game in
>person, I have to admit that there are aspects of the game that I would have
>almost zero appreciation of if it weren't for television.  The one that leaps
>to mind immediately is the art of pitching.  Unless you sit right behind home
>plate, and have better eyes than mine, it is nearly impossible to identify
>what pitch was thrown, and where in/out of the strike zone it was.  On TV,
>not only is this easy to see, but the telescopic effect of the center-field
>camera actually exaggerates the break of the ball to the eye, making it easy
>to see what was thrown.

   [stuff deleted]

I'll confess to being guilty of over generalization in my original comment.
This aspect of television can be beneficial, but I do have a minor problem
with the center field camera, in that the fact that since the camera is
slightly "off center", it distorts the location of the pitch in the
horizontal plane somewhat, which can make it difficult to tell if the ball
was really over the plate.

  [more stuff deleted]

Quote:
>What you lose, of course, is the sense of the spaces of the game, and the
>global view of the play.  I'm not convinced that this couldn't be overcome
>with clever camera placement and good direction.

Absolutely. The past***sense of the game is the most important factor in
my enjoyment, and tv loses this. As a related factor, we often miss the subtle
nuances of the game (ie the shortstop cheating toward second), because of
tv's insistance on giving us a close-up of the pitcher's nose. A good share
of this problem is due to tv's being all too enamoured with it's own
technology. This problem can be overcome. Some of the best camera coverage
that I've seen is ESPN at the college world series. Since they (for whatever
reason) were covering it with relatively few (4 maybe?) cameras, they were
forced to use a lot more shots from a more "drawn back" perspective. For me,
this did a *lot* for restoring that critical sense of space. So yes, it can
be done. The networks chose not to.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

"First thing to do is take a bat and smack 'em upside the head to get their
                     attention. Let's play ball!"


home: 3006 NW McKinley    Corvallis, OR 97330         (503)-752-8424
                        A SABR member since 1979                

 
 
 

Lockout Phone Numbers

Post by tim.. » Sat, 03 Mar 1990 13:10:48

|I'll confess to being guilty of over generalization in my original comment.
|This aspect of television can be beneficial, but I do have a minor problem
|with the center field camera, in that the fact that since the camera is
|slightly "off center", it distorts the location of the pitch in the
|horizontal plane somewhat, which can make it difficult to tell if the ball
|was really over the plate.

Another problem:  they don't have the corresponding view for a left
handed pitcher.  The center field camera makes a right handed pitch
easy to see, but makes it harder to see a left handed pitch.