Double Standards

Double Standards

Post by Ramesh Harihara » Sat, 20 Dec 1997 04:00:00


Friends,

Much attention has been paid by the media in recent weeks to misbehavior by
players and the punishment doled by the NFL and the NBA. While, most people
agree wholeheartedly that they do not condone such behavior in sports,
there appears to very different opinions among people about the "right"
punishments for these actions. Broadly speaking, I have observed that as
long as you are a superstar that strongly influences TV ratings for the
good or bad reasons, you will be let off easy, while a player on a sorry
ass loser team which no one cares much about gets all the punishment so
that the league can "set the tone" for the future. Let's focus on specific
examples:

1. Bobby Knight is probably the biggest repeat offender for abuse of
players over the years; Judgement: "He is a tough coach who wants to get
the best from his players" Punishment "None" !!!

2. Charles Barkley spits on a ***ager and gets a five game suspension.
Tacit message "Charles is one of the bad-boys of the league, but we can't
afford to suspend a superstar for a season"

3. Bill Romanowski spits on J.J. Stokes. Punishment: "$7500.00$. Reasoning
"Bill is one of the valuable linebackers for a team needing him to ensure
homefield... we shouldn't suspend him"

4. Alomar spits on a referee. Punishment: "A major furore all over the
country and he gets decked for 5 games"

5. I am not sure of this one .. but heard it on the radio .. pl. let me
know if this is true. Michael Jordan beats up Steve Kerr in practice.
Punishment "None". Tacit reasoning "His Highness Michael can't be
touched... out TV ratings will suffer

6. Hockey players beat the shit out of each other.. that's supposed to be
"entertainment" People don't even want to talk about that as a big deal.

7. Dennis Rodman kicks (?) the camera man .. 5-10 games (?)

8. Barkeley mauls the poor dude from Angola and gets punished mildly (do
you guys remember what was the punishment ?)

Having seen the above examples, it's not a stretch to say that in the
Sprewell incident, the punishment was too harsh. All these players/coaches
are jerks and need to be dealt with severely .. they set bad examples for
children.. my only problem is that there is simply no consistency in
punishment delivered.

I have a suggestion.. people should be treated as people .. a coach
attacking a coach is no different from a player attacking a coach, a player
attacking a player or a coach abusing a player. There should be common
policy across the board among the major leagues (ok.. let's leave out rowdy
Hockey from the discussion) NBA, NFL, NCAA and MLB. and be consistent in
the punishment starting 1998. All this negative publicity is not good for
the sports in the long run.

Cheers !
--
Ramesh Hariharan
1 Sir Winston
Clifton Park, NY-12065

 
 
 

Double Standards

Post by John E Larksp » Sat, 20 Dec 1997 04:00:00

[valid examples deleted]
: Having seen the above examples, it's not a stretch to say that in the
: Sprewell incident, the punishment was too harsh. All these players/coaches
: are jerks and need to be dealt with severely .. they set bad examples for
: children.. my only problem is that there is simply no consistency in
: punishment delivered.

    I think the biggest problem is we let our children worship
professional athletes, who are essentially entertainers.  The reason these
people aren't good role models isn't because they're bad or irresponsible,
it's because they're athletes.  I realize it's a very insulting
comparison, but they're as significant to society as circus clowns.
Really really popular circus clowns.  It doesn't make them bad people,
just not natural role models.

: I have a suggestion.. people should be treated as people .. a coach
: attacking a coach is no different from a player attacking a coach, a player
: attacking a player or a coach abusing a player. There should be common
: policy across the board among the major leagues (ok.. let's leave out rowdy
: Hockey from the discussion) NBA, NFL, NCAA and MLB. and be consistent in
: the punishment starting 1998. All this negative publicity is not good for
: the sports in the long run.

    Okay, I have a suggestion too.  Go *** your boss.  After you're
fired, please contemplate, as you stand there in court awaiting sentence
on an *** and battery charge including possible jail time, if
Sprewell's punishment was excessive.  
    I'll tell you something right now:  this "severe" punishment isn't
going to stop it from happening in the future.  Someday, not soon but
within the next three years, another player is going to lose his temper
and realize it's okay to physically *** his coach so long as his
current finances are in order.  And to think we've got women refs in the
NBA now.  Imagine if this was a female coach.  The NBA's got some real
criminal problems considering it has the smallest number of players, they
better quit with the fantasy world "discipline" before it's too late.

Lark

 
 
 

Double Standards

Post by Mark Andrew Gann » Sat, 20 Dec 1997 04:00:00

Quote:

>Friends,
>Much attention has been paid by the media in recent weeks to misbehavior by
>players and the punishment doled by the NFL and the NBA. While, most people
>agree wholeheartedly that they do not condone such behavior in sports,
>there appears to very different opinions among people about the "right"
>punishments for these actions. Broadly speaking, I have observed that as
>long as you are a superstar that strongly influences TV ratings for the
>good or bad reasons, you will be let off easy, while a player on a sorry
>ass loser team which no one cares much about gets all the punishment so
>that the league can "set the tone" for the future. Let's focus on specific
>examples:
>1. Bobby Knight is probably the biggest repeat offender for abuse of
>players over the years; Judgement: "He is a tough coach who wants to get
>the best from his players" Punishment "None" !!!
>2. Charles Barkley spits on a ***ager and gets a five game suspension.
>Tacit message "Charles is one of the bad-boys of the league, but we can't
>afford to suspend a superstar for a season"

Wasn't Barkley spitting at some idiot making racist remarks, and the
spittle accidentally hit a girl?  Or was that a different case?  

Quote:
>3. Bill Romanowski spits on J.J. Stokes. Punishment: "$7500.00$. Reasoning
>"Bill is one of the valuable linebackers for a team needing him to ensure
>homefield... we shouldn't suspend him"
>4. Alomar spits on a referee. Punishment: "A major furore all over the
>country and he gets decked for 5 games"

And what was done to the real offender, the umpire (not referee),
Hirschbeck?  Hirschbeck first made a terrible call.  Alomar went back to
the dugout and was discussing the call with his teammates when
Hirschbeck threw him out.  Alomar was not near Hirschbeck, arguing the
call.  Alomar then went out to argue the ejection.  During the ensuing
conversation, Hirschbeck called Alomar a "***" and a "no-good
mother***er."  If a player used words like this, he'd be ejected
immediately.  Hirschbeck calls the player these things and gets off with
no punishment at all.  He is also not held accountable for the things he
does.  His awful ball and strike calling is never reviewed to see if
he's doing  an adequate job.  He can insult players and throw them out
on whims, and not have to worry about any repercussions.  Is that right?

Quote:
>5. I am not sure of this one .. but heard it on the radio .. pl. let me
>know if this is true. Michael Jordan beats up Steve Kerr in practice.
>Punishment "None". Tacit reasoning "His Highness Michael can't be
>touched... out TV ratings will suffer

I think Jordan and Kerr had an altercation in a practice.  But note that
it was in a practice, not a game.  It was an argument between teammates
which they managed to settle themselves, without a spanking and without
the cops coming to help.  Isn't that much nicer?

Quote:
>6. Hockey players beat the shit out of each other.. that's supposed to be
>"entertainment" People don't even want to talk about that as a big deal.

Wow.  Boxers too.  I feel an essay about the evils of the Ultimate
Fighting Championship coming on...

Quote:
>7. Dennis Rodman kicks (?) the camera man .. 5-10 games (?)

What did you want?  Public castration, keelhauling, and exile to the
Sahara?

Quote:
>8. Barkeley mauls the poor dude from Angola and gets punished mildly (do
>you guys remember what was the punishment ?)

"Mauls the poor dude?"  Are you talking about the thing in the Olympics?
I thought that was a joke.  The look on Barkley's face makes it appear
he was joking.  

Quote:
>Having seen the above examples, it's not a stretch to say that in the
>Sprewell incident, the punishment was too harsh. All these players/coaches
>are jerks and need to be dealt with severely .. they set bad examples for
>children..

It's not their job to bring up other peoples' children.  As athletes,
they set excellent examples for any other would-be athletes.  What they
do when they aren't playing games isn't my business.  

Quote:
>my only problem is that there is simply no consistency in
>punishment delivered.

This is how the world works.  A sick serial killer who happens to be
wearing a military or police uniform is often made a hero.  Funny how
the same behavior can be heroic if you're in a government uniform, and
heinous and shocking if you're not.  

Quote:
>I have a suggestion.. people should be treated as people .. a coach
>attacking a coach is no different from a player attacking a coach, a player
>attacking a player or a coach abusing a player. There should be common
>policy across the board among the major leagues (ok.. let's leave out rowdy
>Hockey from the discussion) NBA, NFL, NCAA and MLB. and be consistent in
>the punishment starting 1998.

Why?  They are independent leagues.  Why should they have any common
policy?  And who will decide this policy?  What if some of the leagues
don't like the policy?  Would you force them to implement it?

Quote:
>All this negative publicity is not good for
>the sports in the long run.

Let "the sports" worry about that themselves.  

--Mark
  :-b
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
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                        attack the campsites."
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--------------------------------------------------------------------------

 
 
 

Double Standards

Post by Charli » Sat, 20 Dec 1997 04:00:00

Quote:


> >Friends,

> >Much attention has been paid by the media in recent weeks to misbehavior by
> >players and the punishment doled by the NFL and the NBA. While, most people
> >agree wholeheartedly that they do not condone such behavior in sports,
> >there appears to very different opinions among people about the "right"
> >punishments for these actions. Broadly speaking, I have observed that as
> >long as you are a superstar that strongly influences TV ratings for the
> >good or bad reasons, you will be let off easy, while a player on a sorry
> >ass loser team which no one cares much about gets all the punishment so
> >that the league can "set the tone" for the future. Let's focus on specific
> >examples:

> >1. Bobby Knight is probably the biggest repeat offender for abuse of
> >players over the years; Judgement: "He is a tough coach who wants to get
> >the best from his players" Punishment "None" !!!

I am baffled that Knight has been able to keep his job for so long.

Quote:
> >3. Bill Romanowski spits on J.J. Stokes. Punishment: "$7500.00$. Reasoning
> >"Bill is one of the valuable linebackers for a team needing him to ensure
> >homefield... we shouldn't suspend him"

Didn't hear that the league or Broncos wouldn't suspended him based
on that.

It was horrible judgement on Romanowskis part, and he should probably
have
been suspended for a game. But to compare spitting on someone in the
heat
of a game to spitting on an umpire is a bit of a stretch.

And Romanowski apologized publicly the next day. Even tried to get
in contact with Stokes and apologize personally and Stokes said it was
over and done with. Very different than Alomar who at first defended
his action and blamed Hirschbeck.

- Show quoted text -

Quote:

> >4. Alomar spits on a referee. Punishment: "A major furore all over the
> >country and he gets decked for 5 games"

> And what was done to the real offender, the umpire (not referee),
> Hirschbeck?  Hirschbeck first made a terrible call.  Alomar went back to
> the dugout and was discussing the call with his teammates when
> Hirschbeck threw him out.  Alomar was not near Hirschbeck, arguing the
> call.  Alomar then went out to argue the ejection.  During the ensuing
> conversation, Hirschbeck called Alomar a "***" and a "no-good
> mother***er."  If a player used words like this, he'd be ejected
> immediately.  Hirschbeck calls the player these things and gets off with
> no punishment at all.  He is also not held accountable for the things he
> does.  His awful ball and strike calling is never reviewed to see if
> he's doing  an adequate job.  He can insult players and throw them out
> on whims, and not have to worry about any repercussions.  Is that right?

Never heard that Hirschbeck used the words you say he used.

Quote:

> >5. I am not sure of this one .. but heard it on the radio .. pl. let me
> >know if this is true. Michael Jordan beats up Steve Kerr in practice.
> >Punishment "None". Tacit reasoning "His Highness Michael can't be
> >touched... out TV ratings will suffer

> I think Jordan and Kerr had an altercation in a practice.  But note that
> it was in a practice, not a game.  It was an argument between teammates
> which they managed to settle themselves, without a spanking and without
> the cops coming to help.  Isn't that much nicer?

There are altercations in practice all the time.
Most probably don't make the news.

Quote:
> >8. Barkeley mauls the poor dude from Angola and gets punished mildly (do
> >you guys remember what was the punishment ?)

> "Mauls the poor dude?"  Are you talking about the thing in the Olympics?
> I thought that was a joke.  The look on Barkley's face makes it appear
> he was joking.

The Angolan players thought it was great, whether he was joking or not.
From what I remember they were e***d to go home and say they mixed
it up with Barkley.

Quote:
> This is how the world works.  A sick serial killer who happens to be
> wearing a military or police uniform is often made a hero.  Funny how
> the same behavior can be heroic if you're in a government uniform, and
> heinous and shocking if you're not.

Whoa!! Serial killers in police uniforms?!?! Where in the USA is this
happening???

And a military person killing multiple people who are trying to kill
him is hardly a serial killer.

 
 
 

Double Standards

Post by McCar » Sat, 20 Dec 1997 04:00:00

Quote:

>     Okay, I have a suggestion too.  Go *** your boss.  After you're
> fired, please contemplate, as you stand there in court awaiting sentence
> on an *** and battery charge including possible jail time, if
> Sprewell's punishment was excessive.

This is a dumb correlation that has been overused in this incident.
Player/coach relationship is in no way similar to a normal employee/boss
relationship.  In the NBA, players argue with coaches, throw towels at
coaches...I CAN NAME SEVERAL INSTANCES WHERE COACHES HAVE BEEN FIRED AT
THE PLAYER'S BEHEST!!!  How many times does that happen in the real
world?  In addition to all this, a coach has *no* authority to fire a
player.  How is this a boss/employee relationship?  Take this nonsense
somewhere else.  Ramesh made a great point and you blockheads are so
stiff and stupid you can't even agree that what he talked about should
be food for thought.

Ken McCary

 
 
 

Double Standards

Post by Ted Krueg » Sat, 20 Dec 1997 04:00:00


Quote:


>>     Okay, I have a suggestion too.  Go *** your boss.  After you're
>> fired, please contemplate, as you stand there in court awaiting sentence
>> on an *** and battery charge including possible jail time, if
>> Sprewell's punishment was excessive.
>This is a dumb correlation that has been overused in this incident.
>Player/coach relationship is in no way similar to a normal employee/boss
>relationship.  In the NBA, players argue with coaches, throw towels at
>coaches...I CAN NAME SEVERAL INSTANCES WHERE COACHES HAVE BEEN FIRED AT
>THE PLAYER'S BEHEST!!!  How many times does that happen in the real
>world?  In addition to all this, a coach has *no* authority to fire a
>player.  How is this a boss/employee relationship?  Take this nonsense
>somewhere else.  Ramesh made a great point and you blockheads are so
>stiff and stupid you can't even agree that what he talked about should
>be food for thought.

OK then, let's make the exactly correct comparison.

Spre and PJ are co-workers.

Now, go ***one of your co-workers and see it you don't get your ***
slammed in jail.

Then tell me about fairness and food for thought.

Ted

--
So you don't believe in media bias, eh?  "In the aftermath of today's 500 point
loss in the Dow Jones, Bill Gates lost 1.76 billion dollars...If that makes you
feel any better."  - Peter Jennings, World News Tonight, 10/27/97

 
 
 

Double Standards

Post by Douglas Gla » Sun, 21 Dec 1997 04:00:00

: Friends,

: Much attention has been paid by the media in recent weeks to misbehavior by
: players and the punishment doled by the NFL and the NBA. While, most people
: agree wholeheartedly that they do not condone such behavior in sports,
: there appears to very different opinions among people about the "right"
: punishments for these actions. Broadly speaking, I have observed that as
: long as you are a superstar that strongly influences TV ratings for the
: good or bad reasons, you will be let off easy, while a player on a sorry
: ass loser team which no one cares much about gets all the punishment so
: that the league can "set the tone" for the future. Let's focus on specific
: examples:

: 1. Bobby Knight is probably the biggest repeat offender for abuse of
: players over the years; Judgement: "He is a tough coach who wants to get
: the best from his players" Punishment "None" !!!

: 2. Charles Barkley spits on a ***ager and gets a five game suspension.
: Tacit message "Charles is one of the bad-boys of the league, but we can't
: afford to suspend a superstar for a season"

: 3. Bill Romanowski spits on J.J. Stokes. Punishment: "$7500.00$. Reasoning
: "Bill is one of the valuable linebackers for a team needing him to ensure
: homefield... we shouldn't suspend him"

: 4. Alomar spits on a referee. Punishment: "A major furore all over the
: country and he gets decked for 5 games"

: 5. I am not sure of this one .. but heard it on the radio .. pl. let me
: know if this is true. Michael Jordan beats up Steve Kerr in practice.
: Punishment "None". Tacit reasoning "His Highness Michael can't be
: touched... out TV ratings will suffer

Well, whatever happened, Steve Kerr deserved it. He's a punk. Case closed.

 
 
 

Double Standards

Post by cglas.. » Sun, 21 Dec 1997 04:00:00



Quote:
> 5. I am not sure of this one .. but heard it on the radio .. pl. let me
> know if this is true. Michael Jordan beats up Steve Kerr in practice.
> Punishment "None". Tacit reasoning "His Highness Michael can't be
> touched... out TV ratings will suffer

Not only that, but Kerr *started* it.

If I remember correctly, it was a practice altercation over who kept
pushing off too *** defense during a scrimmage (and I honestly can't
remember who was defending who in the drill), and the argument got heated
and Kerr shoved Jordan hard.

After Steve lost his temper (for the only time this decade -- Steve Kerr
losing his temper, that's one of those things you *never* expected to
hear about), then Jordan got mad and 'shoved' him back -- with his
knuckles.

Kerr got back up, him and Jordan walked to opposite corners, and by 15
minutes later both guys were cool again.

And Steve Kerr, when he was talking about it a couple months ago in the
_Chicago Tribune_ (which is where I heard all these details) said that he
doesn't hold any grudge at all.  And since this is Steve talking, I
believe him when he says that... we *all* know that Steve Kerr is Mr.
Nice Guy.

So I don't see the Bulls' little "practice scuffle" that was listed above
as being anything *near* a parallel to a case where someone attempted to
***** his coach once, then came back 15 minutes later and committed
a premeditated felonious *** on him *again*...

If Phil Jackson knew that the occurrence was a fluke (which it was), and
that nobody was hurt (which they weren't), and that both of the people
involved are simply NOT the type of people who would ever repeat such
behavior (which they wouldn't -- Steve Kerr especially, the man is almost
terminally nice)...

.... then why *should* he report the incident to the league at all (which
he didn't, as I recall), and watch them start suspending and fining his
players for something that they're not going to do again anyway?

As opposed to what a coach should do when one of his players does
something that, if it had happened out on the street, would have resulted
in the local police making an arrest for attempted *** -- THEN you
call in the league and start with the major disciplinary action.

No double standard that I can perceive -- vastly different circumstances
means a vastly different degree of punishment is necessary.

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      http://SportToday.org/;   Search, Read, Post to Usenet

 
 
 

Double Standards

Post by cglas.. » Mon, 22 Dec 1997 04:00:00



Quote:


> : Friends,
<snip>
> : 5. I am not sure of this one .. but heard it on the radio .. pl. let me
> : know if this is true. Michael Jordan beats up Steve Kerr in practice.
> : Punishment "None". Tacit reasoning "His Highness Michael can't be
> : touched... out TV ratings will suffer

> Well, whatever happened, Steve Kerr deserved it. He's a punk. Case closed.

Steve Kerr?  Punk?  In the Star Trek 'Mirror Universe', maybe...

I think you forgot to put the "Extreme Sarcasm Warning" label on this
one.  :-)

-------------------==== Posted via Deja News ====-----------------------
      http://www.dejanews.com/     Search, Read, Post to Usenet

 
 
 

Double Standards

Post by Ted Krueg » Tue, 23 Dec 1997 04:00:00


Quote:


>: 5. I am not sure of this one .. but heard it on the radio .. pl. let me
>: know if this is true. Michael Jordan beats up Steve Kerr in practice.
>: Punishment "None". Tacit reasoning "His Highness Michael can't be
>: touched... out TV ratings will suffer
>Well, whatever happened, Steve Kerr deserved it. He's a punk. Case closed.

This has just got to be a troll.

If Kerr is a punk, then Sprewell is the Devil himself.

Ted

--
So you don't believe in media bias, eh?  "In the aftermath of today's 500 point
loss in the Dow Jones, Bill Gates lost 1.76 billion dollars...If that makes you
feel any better."  - Peter Jennings, World News Tonight, 10/27/97

 
 
 

Double Standards

Post by Aaron Poun » Tue, 23 Dec 1997 04:00:00

Quote:


> >     Okay, I have a suggestion too.  Go *** your boss.  After you're
> > fired, please contemplate, as you stand there in court awaiting sentence
> > on an *** and battery charge including possible jail time, if
> > Sprewell's punishment was excessive.

> This is a dumb correlation that has been overused in this incident.
> Player/coach relationship is in no way similar to a normal employee/boss
> relationship.  In the NBA, players argue with coaches, throw towels at
> coaches...I CAN NAME SEVERAL INSTANCES WHERE COACHES HAVE BEEN FIRED AT
> THE PLAYER'S BEHEST!!!  How many times does that happen in the real
> world?  In addition to all this, a coach has *no* authority to fire a
> player.  How is this a boss/employee relationship?  Take this nonsense
> somewhere else.  Ramesh made a great point and you blockheads are so
> stiff and stupid you can't even agree that what he talked about should
> be food for thought.

> Ken McCary

Okay, here's a suggestion.  Don't *** your boss.  Just attack a
coworker, you know, attempt to throttle him, and then after a while come
back and try to hit him over the head.  Then once you're fired and up on
*** charges and he brings the civil ***-and-battery suit against
you ask if Sprewell's punishment was excessive.

The point is that in civilized society what Sprewell did was wholly
unacceptable.  It doesn't matter if he attacked his boss, his coworker
or his underling.  It is still an ***, a violation of the law and an
attack on the basic right of a citizen to be unmolested by others
without legal cause.  Whether a coach may be fired because a player
wants it badly enough, or whether a coach can fire a player or not is
entirely irrelevant.  Comparatively, Sprewell got a free pass on this
one.

Finally, if you think a coach he "no" authority to fire a player, ask
those who have been cut if they've been fired or not.

Aaron J. Pound, esq.

 
 
 

Double Standards

Post by Ramesh Harihara » Wed, 24 Dec 1997 04:00:00

If you go back and read my article, you will realize I am in no way
defending Spree, but merely pointing out the inconsistencies of the
punishments doled out.
--
Ramesh Hariharan
1 Sir Winston
Clifton Park, NY-12065



Quote:
> The point is that in civilized society what Sprewell did was wholly
> unacceptable.  It doesn't matter if he attacked his boss, his coworker
> or his underling.  It is still an ***, a violation of the law and an
> attack on the basic right of a citizen to be unmolested by others
> without legal cause.  Whether a coach may be fired because a player
> wants it badly enough, or whether a coach can fire a player or not is
> entirely irrelevant.  Comparatively, Sprewell got a free pass on this
> one.

> Finally, if you think a coach he "no" authority to fire a player, ask
> those who have been cut if they've been fired or not.

> Aaron J. Pound, esq.

 
 
 

Double Standards

Post by Nelli » Tue, 30 Dec 1997 04:00:00

Quote:

> 1. Bobby Knight is probably the biggest repeat offender for abuse of
> players over the years; Judgement: "He is a tough coach who wants to get
> the best from his players" Punishment "None" !!!

Go Bobby!

Quote:

> 2. Charles Barkley spits on a ***ager and gets a five game suspension.
> Tacit message "Charles is one of the bad-boys of the league, but we can't
> afford to suspend a superstar for a season"

I think he was aiming elsewhere.  What about when Mike Ditka threw gum
into a crowd.  What was his punishment?

Quote:

> 3. Bill Romanowski spits on J.J. Stokes. Punishment: "$7500.00$. Reasoning
> "Bill is one of the valuable linebackers for a team needing him to ensure
> homefield... we shouldn't suspend him"

From what I heard, professional football players get this all the time.
In pileups players are spitting, scratching, grabbing(I will not say
where), etc, etc.  The only reason this was given attention was because
it was caught on camera.

Quote:

> 4. Alomar spits on a referee. Punishment: "A major furore all over the
> country and he gets decked for 5 games"

Five games the next season.  I think some of the argument was that the
suspension should have taken place right away, not at the start of the
next season.  Correct me if I'm wrong.

Quote:

> 5. I am not sure of this one .. but heard it on the radio .. pl. let me
> know if this is true. Michael Jordan beats up Steve Kerr in practice.
> Punishment "None". Tacit reasoning "His Highness Michael can't be
> touched... out TV ratings will suffer

"beats up"?  I hardly think that was the case.  That makes it sound like
the Michael Westbrook incident.  Was it a mutual scuffle?  Who started
it?  What actually happened?  Many unanswered questions.  Maybe Michael
didn't deserve to get suspended because he was defending himself.  Don't
pass judgement before you know the facts.

While it could be argued that in the above cases there should have been
suspensions, or the suspensions that were given out should have been
longer.  But all these are still lacking one thing that the Sprewell
incident had.  Sprewell returned 15 minutes later meaning the second act
was a premeditated act.  Sprewell was not suspended for a year for
attacking his coach the first time(no doubt he would have received a
suspension of some kind).  He was suspended for the second act.  Had he
not returned after the original incident I doubt he would have gotten
one year.  There have not been to many cases where the players have
returned a second time(except maybe hockey, those guys are always
fighting).

Quote:
> Having seen the above examples, it's not a stretch to say that in the
> Sprewell incident, the punishment was too harsh. All these players/coaches
> are jerks and need to be dealt with severely .. they set bad examples for
> children.. my only problem is that there is simply no consistency in
> punishment delivered.

Their isn't consistency in life either.  In courts repeat offenders get
tougher sentences(robbers, drug dealers) while prominant
people(congressmen, the rich) get lesser sentences.  In sports repeat
offenders(players like Rodman) will always get harsher penalties then
superstars(Jordan, Barkley) who are important to the game.  You are
correct that their are different penalties for different people, but I
believe that is a part of life and will not change.  It doesn't mean I
agree with it but that is just the way it is.

Nellie.