Baseball Encyc. or Total Baseball?

Baseball Encyc. or Total Baseball?

Post by Bob Hu » Thu, 01 Mar 1990 01:17:14


Last September during a cross-town move I managed to lose (!) my Baseball
Encyclopedia.  (Actually, I think my landlord's maintenance people stole
it, but I have nothing to support that theory.)  Anyway, life hasn't been
as fulfilling since then, so I've decided to replace my loss.

However, since I bought TBE, a similar book titled (I think) Total Baseball
has been published.  Can people who own either one give me their opinions?
I would appreciate it.

Bob Hurt   Seattle

 
 
 

Baseball Encyc. or Total Baseball?

Post by michael j yalk » Fri, 02 Mar 1990 17:37:16


(Bob Hurt) says:

Quote:

>Last September during a cross-town move I managed to lose (!) my Baseball
>Encyclopedia.  (Actually, I think my landlord's maintenance people stole
>it, but I have nothing to support that theory.)  Anyway, life hasn't been
>as fulfilling since then, so I've decided to replace my loss.

>However, since I bought TBE, a similar book titled (I think) Total Baseball
>has been published.  Can people who own either one give me their opinions?
>I would appreciate it.

>Bob Hurt   Seattle


I own  both the 1978 edition of the Official Encyclopedia of Baseball and  the
1988 edition of something called The  Sports Encyclopedia - Baseball Edition.
My copies arein New York and I am overseas so I my have slightly altered the
titles and years of publication but I remember the books well enough to write
about  them.  TSE-BE is  absolutely incredible!  It has just about everything
you ever wanted to know about baseball.  It has loads   of statistics on every
player  who played inthe modern era (post-1900) --  incluuding players from
before who played  afterwards as well. It also has a section with award
winner and Hall Of Fame members.  In addition, it has cumulative box scores
from every playoff series of the modern era  and team rosters with statistics
for every season.  It also has  summaries of every season and listings of
career statistics for every player.  The OEB also has some of thosefeatures but
it lacks the wealth of statistics foundin the other.The OEB though has some
good historical essays and a section of articles by early stars about how to
play the game.  Also, ithas a listing for most players from the pre-modern era.
But it contains only HRs and BAs for hitters and ERAsand WL records for
pitchers.  I am not sure which of these (or others for that matter) you owned
but I would highly recommend the Sports Encylopedia -- it  made my OEB
obsolete.

Michael J Yalkut

 
 
 

Baseball Encyc. or Total Baseball?

Post by David M Ta » Sun, 04 Mar 1990 00:14:36

I own the 1988 Baseball Encyclopedia (stats through 1987, at any rate), and
the 1987 Sports Encyclopedia--Baseball.  I find the two books, despite the
very large overlap in information, to be useful in complementary ways.  In
essence, the Baseball Encyclopedia is individual-oriented; it gives player
(offensive) stats one player at a time, year by year.  The same is true of
pitching stats.  This is essential to being able to follow the rise and fall
of careers, and is not done by SE--B.  In addition, BE has an extensive list
of all-time records, including fielding records and relief pitching.  There is
also a section on managers, a section for home/away performance of all teams
ever, and discussion of rule changes.  Finally, there is a section giving all
playoff and World Series results.

SE--B, on the other hand, is season-oriented.  Each season includes a brief
essay on the significant events/climate of the season, a list of the team
stats for each team that season (broken down by player), and line scores of
the playoff and series games, with a composite box score for the whole thing.
At the end of the book are lists of lifetime/single-season/yearly leaders in
many offensive and defensive categories, team records, and HOF/Award histories.

You cannot use the BE to see at a glance what the '57 Indians were like.  On
the other hand, you can't use SE--B to see at a glance what Minnie Minoso's
career was like.  SE--B doesn't include any defensive stats; BE doesn't give
team totals by season for many offensive and pitching categories.  Both books
can be very useful references; BE is by far the more expensive of the two (but
also has better printing and fewer typos).  You choose.

Perhaps someone familiar with "Total Baseball" could post a similar comparison
for it with one or both of the above.

[Incidentally, if you are interested in the history of baseball at all, I
would highly recommend "The Bill James Historical Baseball Abstract", one of
the most enjoyable and dense-with-fascination books I have ever seen...]

--
        David M. Tate       | "It made the basses of their being throb in    

                            |  pizzicati of Hosanna..."
 "A Man for all Seasonings" |                     -- Wallace Stevens