more failed run outs?

more failed run outs?

Post by bobgree » Thu, 07 Nov 1996 04:00:00


Please take your best shots at these & tell me where I went wrong?

My general approach to evaluating a 8 ball table for a run out is:
1. note all problem clusters & ball positions requiring difficult
shots immediately & roughly plan how you will run the table. Don't
forget about the 8 ball. It may be that the only opportunity to break
it out of a problem situation or roll it to an optimal open position
on the table occurs early in a run.

2. save easy shots that can be used later to get back into control
when you didn't get desired position on a particular shot

3. attempt to establish a pattern of shooting to break out clusters
early (softly, so they don't recluster elsewhere) in the run so that
more escape balls are available to use in continuing the run  

4. shoot a critical shot as soon as posible in a run. If you miss more
of your balls will be on the table to impede or block opponent's run

5. Always make the ball first & play optimal shape second..You don't
get to continue if you miss the shot.

6. Never bank a shot if you can possibly avoid it ( This may be a
personal problem, but I feel more confident in making hard cut shots
than easy bank shots). I must admit that occasional bank shots can be
very useful in optimizing position for subsequent shots. If I must
bank a given ball because its blocked , I try particularly hard to get
optimal shape for the bank shot..low % bank shots are great when they
work out..may be that's because I miss so many of them

7. Minimize cue ball roll, ie shoot stop shots and try to keep the cue
ball in the middle of the table...may not be possible & depends on
ball positions. Work the cue ball gradually up & down the table, as
opposed to going from end to end where hitting intervening balls may
destroy your run. Don't hit opponent's balls if it can be avoided
since they may block shots that previously were open.

8. If it becomes obvious that you can't run out..don't make any more
of your balls (especially easy ones)..& try to break out your problem
balls, while leaving your opponent no shot. My feeling is that playing
safe, but not establishing a situation where you are threatening to
run out, tends to get you beat against a good opponent. He will break
out his problem balls and you still have your problem cluster. At
least try to position one of your remaining balls in the open near the
problem cluster so that you have the potential to break out the
cluster while making the open ball. (wishful thinking)

9. Why is it that after making a really hard shot, I miss an easy one?
or even more frustrating is the miss of a relatively easy shot when it
is obvious that all the remaining balls can easily be made for a run
out??

 
 
 

more failed run outs?

Post by suarez31 » Sun, 10 Nov 1996 04:00:00

Quote:

> Please take your best shots at these & tell me where I went wrong?

>>>>>>SNIPPED<<<<<<
> 9. Why is it that after making a really hard shot, I miss an easy one?
> or even more frustrating is the miss of a relatively easy shot when it
> is obvious that all the remaining balls can easily be made for a run
> out??

Bob,

One more problem with the previous 8 points of discussion you wrote is
that "after all of that is considered" you miss the 1st shot. Or "its
not your turn" (you didn't see the one ball drop)

But, I guess the last (number 9) is the most common, I tend to blame
myself for "still remembering" the great shoot, and not "concentrating"
on the next shot enough......

Next time,

Tom

 
 
 

more failed run outs?

Post by Dave You » Sun, 10 Nov 1996 04:00:00

I would recommend people try to view the instructional video
"The Art of 8-Ball" by Jimmy Reid.  It's not just one more rehash of
the basics, and it even has a kicking system thrown in at no extra
charge.  

Now, providing a few thoughts on your excellent list ( with much
snipping),

Quote:
>1. note all problem clusters & ball positions requiring difficult ...

Generally start with the 8-ball and work backwards.  Try to see
small patterns when then make up a larger pattern.  (The old
shoot 3 balls at a time thing).

Quote:
>2. save easy shots that can be used later to ...

Think in terms of key balls which are positiioned to get tricky
position, break out clusters, and move from one pattern to another.

Quote:
>5. Always make the ball first & play optimal shape second..You don't
>get to continue if you miss the shot.

I personally tend to lean more on position play.  What does it
accomplish to sink one ball if you can't get  to the next one and the
next one, etc.  

Quote:
>6. Never bank a shot if you can possibly avoid it

This is where 2-way shots come in.  The harder the bank the
more you need to concentrate on cue ball position, leaving
yourself a next shot and your opponent safe.

Quote:
>9. Why is it that after making a really hard shot, I miss an easy one?
>or even more frustrating is the miss of a relatively easy shot when it
>is obvious that all the remaining balls can easily be made for a run
>out??

Ah, finally an area in which I have much practical experience.  Why
do people sabotage themselves?  For the answer, consult
"The Inner Game of Tennis" by W. Timothy Gallway.  

 
 
 

more failed run outs?

Post by Kelly Peters » Tue, 12 Nov 1996 04:00:00


Quote:

>> Please take your best shots at these & tell me where I went wrong?

>>>>>>>SNIPPED<<<<<<

>> 9. Why is it that after making a really hard shot, I miss an easy one?
>> or even more frustrating is the miss of a relatively easy shot when it
>> is obvious that all the remaining balls can easily be made for a run
>> out??

Some insight to the last question could be the type of personality you
have, or what motivates you while you are shooting.  Sometimes, when
there is a trouble ball, or tough position play, I will execute and
run out, but when it is a very easy lie, i'll miss an easy shot.  One
reason is because I have already decided it is an easy run out,
within my ability to do, and my motivation is not there.  I have
already, so to speak, run the table in my head, and the shooting is
going through the motions.  Ofcourse, this also depends on what is
at stake in the game.  Sometimes, it can be good to force yourself to
not think past 2 or 3 balls, especially if the lie is an easy run out.
Then, you still have mental work to do throughout the run out.
Kelly
 
 
 

more failed run outs?

Post by jgkj.. » Fri, 15 Nov 1996 04:00:00

Quote:

>Ah, finally an area in which I have much practical experience.  Why
>do people sabotage themselves?  For the answer, consult
>"The Inner Game of Tennis" by W. Timothy Gallway.  

Wow someone else that reads tennis books for pool.
I read this book 20 years ago it very good.
I also liked Zen and the Art of Archery.
Great pool books.
 
 
 

more failed run outs?

Post by bobgree » Sat, 16 Nov 1996 04:00:00

I agree that one's mind set can be an important factor in run out
success..perhaps even one's concept of their own ability. I have
sometimes been in the "zone", where basically I feel I can make
everything, regardless of the shape or circumstances & usually am
getting the "good" rolls on breakouts. Then there are the other days
when making a straight in is a difficult task..Confidence in your game
seems to be a key here..& certainly practice brings with it
confidence. Who was it that said "Luck is when preparation meets
opportunity"?

 
 
 

more failed run outs?

Post by worm stomp » Sun, 17 Nov 1996 04:00:00

On Mon, 11 Nov 1996 18:58:28 GMT, Kelly Peterson at

Quote:


>>> Please take your best shots at these & tell me where I went wrong?

>>>>>>>>SNIPPED<<<<<<

>>> 9. Why is it that after making a really hard shot, I miss an easy one?
>>> or even more frustrating is the miss of a relatively easy shot when it
>>> is obvious that all the remaining balls can easily be made for a run
>>> out??
>Some insight to the last question could be the type of personality you
>have, or what motivates you while you are shooting. . . .
     . . .
>Kelly

Inasmuch as this phenomena seems universal, it piqued my curiosity also.
Science had to be involved since it is so common an experience.  I found
out it's really the law.

"The probability of success on the current shot is the reciprocal of the
difficulty of the immediately preceding shot, compounded by the length
of the current run, factoring in the number of ball remaining needed to
win."

     Bud Enski

=====  Whose two cents sometimes . . .

             . . . ain't worth a plugged nickel!

 
 
 

more failed run outs?

Post by wcr.. » Mon, 18 Nov 1996 04:00:00

Bud said

Quote:
>"The probability of success on the current shot is the reciprocal of the
>difficulty of the immediately preceding shot, compounded by the length
>of the current run, factoring in the number of balls remaining needed to
>win."

Gee...and I always thought I was dogging it!
 
 
 

more failed run outs?

Post by Carl M. Pears » Tue, 19 Nov 1996 04:00:00


Quote:
>>>> 9. Why is it that after making a really hard shot, I miss an easy one?

EASY!

Because you shoot better with TWO hands.  After a great shot you are down
to only one hand, the other one is busy patting yourself on the back.
Ruins your stance, too.  Try it.

Quote:
>>>> or even more frustrating is the miss of a relatively easy shot when it
>>>> is obvious that all the remaining balls can easily be made for a run
>>>> out??

EASY!

Because you shoot better when you are watching the table, instead of
scanning the spectators trying to anticipate who will be the most
impressed with your (pending) run-out.  One of my favorite ways to
miscue.

Carlo
(Who all too frequently shoots no-handed and eyes shut.)

 
 
 

more failed run outs?

Post by Keith C. C » Sat, 23 Nov 1996 04:00:00

For the inner game of pool, check out the Monk's "Point the Way"  or check
out his web page
http://www.themonk.com

For the answer, consult

Quote:
> >"The Inner Game of Tennis" by W. Timothy Gallway.  
> Wow someone else that reads tennis books for pool.

 
 
 

more failed run outs?

Post by Bob Jewe » Sat, 23 Nov 1996 04:00:00


: For the inner game of pool, check out the Monk's "Point the Way"  or check
: out his web page

The Monk's approach is entirely different from Gallwey's approach,
especially in how the opponent is considered.  It is curious that
Gallwey's style seems much closer to the popular view of "Eastern
belief."

I much prefer Gallwey.

Bob Jewett

 
 
 

more failed run outs?

Post by bobgree » Tue, 26 Nov 1996 04:00:00

I am presently reading Gallwey's "innner tennis" and believe he has
some good points-particularly with respect to relaxing & just letting
things happen..Couldn't help but notice he also has a recent book on
"inner golf"..I would think the parallels between shots in pool & the
"pressure putt" would be close..Anybody read it?