BCA instruction program

BCA instruction program

Post by Laura Friedma » Mon, 25 Aug 1997 04:00:00



Quote:
> I'm considering taking lessons. Has anyone participated in the BCA
> instruction program with a BCA certified instructor? If so please
> reply.
>                 Tim fm CT

Tim,

I take it you are not asking for referrals, but asking about the general
quality of the BCA certified instructor program.  

I was a BCA certified instructor until a few years ago.  I became one
simply by applying.  There were no tests and very minimal criteria to meet.
 I am no longer in the program, so I can't tell you if there have been any
changes.  I've heard that the BCA started their "masters" instructor
program because of complains that there was no quality control for their
certified instructors.  Ostensibly the "masters" have to be tested in some
way, although I'd bet that some people were simply grandfathered in because
they were certified for so long.  So don't assume that being a BCA
instructor is any kind of assurance of quality.  

Also, don't assume that because someone plays well they will make a good
teacher.  Ironically, I've found that the best players usually make the
worst teachers.   Good players can certainly tell you a lot about game
strategy, but most people taking lessons mostly need work with their
fundamentals.  The best players are usually "naturals" at the game, which
means they have not had to worry much about stroke and stance.  So they
certainly won't be able to help you much with yours.  Great players don't
know how to teach others because they actually don't know how they do what
they do.  They are likely to be baffled about why you can't draw the ball
the length of the table, because it's always been so easy for them.  It's
the people who have had to struggle a bit who are more likely to be great
students of the game, and therefore, great teachers of others.  It's more
important for a teacher to be hyper-observant and able to communicate than
to be a great player.  Remember the old saying: "those who can't do, teach.
 Those who can't teach, become guidance counselors."

In terms of finding a teacher, ask around, particularly to old students.
Also, don't assume that you will notice immediate improvement.  If an
instructor corrects an old bad habit, it will usually pull your game down
until you adjust to the change.  So be patient and practice practice
practice.

Rambling-in-CA, aka Laura

 
 
 

BCA instruction program

Post by Bob Jewe » Tue, 26 Aug 1997 04:00:00

: I was a BCA certified instructor until a few years ago.  I became one
: simply by applying.  There were no tests and very minimal criteria to meet.

That has changed.  Those interested in the present BCA Certified Instructors
program should check out http://www.bca-pool.com/instruction/ or call or
write to the BCA.  Bruce Baker is the person there to talk to.

: So don't assume that being a BCA
: instructor is any kind of assurance of quality.  

Well, yes, but....  There is presently a three-day course requirement
to become a Certified Instructor, and taking the course is not a
guarantee of passing.  If instructors want to advance to higher levels
(Advanced, Master) they have to have on file instructor evaluations
sent in by students.  Part of the BCA program is to provide feedback
to the instructors from these forms.

Bob Jewett
BCA Certified Instructor
Member, BCA Instructors Committee

 
 
 

BCA instruction program

Post by Striker9 » Thu, 28 Aug 1997 04:00:00

I have taken lessons from a BCA certified instructor in Connecticut who
has helped me increase my knowledge and skill  tremendously.  I would
highly recommend this process to anyone.

 
 
 

BCA instruction program

Post by Aaron Ber » Sun, 31 Aug 1997 04:00:00

Quote:



> > I'm considering taking lessons. Has anyone participated in the BCA
> > instruction program with a BCA certified instructor? If so please
> > reply.
> >                 Tim fm CT

> Tim,

> I take it you are not asking for referrals, but asking about the
> general
> quality of the BCA certified instructor program.

> I was a BCA certified instructor until a few years ago.  I became one
> simply by applying.  There were no tests and very minimal criteria to
> meet.
>  I am no longer in the program, so I can't tell you if there have been
> any
> changes.  I've heard that the BCA started their "masters" instructor
> program because of complains that there was no quality control for
> their
> certified instructors.  Ostensibly the "masters" have to be tested in
> some
> way, although I'd bet that some people were simply grandfathered in
> because
> they were certified for so long.  So don't assume that being a BCA
> instructor is any kind of assurance of quality.

> Also, don't assume that because someone plays well they will make a
> good
> teacher.  Ironically, I've found that the best players usually make
> the
> worst teachers.   Good players can certainly tell you a lot about game

> strategy, but most people taking lessons mostly need work with their
> fundamentals.  The best players are usually "naturals" at the game,
> which
> means they have not had to worry much about stroke and stance.  So
> they
> certainly won't be able to help you much with yours.  Great players
> don't
> know how to teach others because they actually don't know how they do
> what
> they do.  They are likely to be baffled about why you can't draw the
> ball
> the length of the table, because it's always been so easy for them.
> It's
> the people who have had to struggle a bit who are more likely to be
> great
> students of the game, and therefore, great teachers of others.  It's
> more
> important for a teacher to be hyper-observant and able to communicate
> than
> to be a great player.  Remember the old saying: "those who can't do,
> teach.
>  Those who can't teach, become guidance counselors."

> In terms of finding a teacher, ask around, particularly to old
> students.
> Also, don't assume that you will notice immediate improvement.  If an
> instructor corrects an old bad habit, it will usually pull your game
> down
> until you adjust to the change.  So be patient and practice practice
> practice.

> Rambling-in-CA, aka Laura

   Is it expensive to become a BCA Instructor?  I've been thinking after
taking some small business courses and opening a room it would be good
to be able to teach classes or offer a program to a middle or senior
high schools phy. ed  course like they do with bowling.  Maybe even do a
show on a local cable network like those interesting(ZZZzzz)
learn to paint programs.

Aaron

 
 
 

BCA instruction program

Post by =^.^ » Tue, 02 Sep 1997 04:00:00

Quote:

>I'm considering taking lessons. Has anyone participated in the BCA
>instruction program with a BCA certified instructor? If so please
>reply.
>                Tim fm CT

Hi, Tim.

I just finished taking lessons from a BCA certified instructor a
couple weeks ago. If you go to
http://www.bca-pool.com/instruction/ci_list.htm you will find a list
of certified instructors by state, with phone numbers. This is how I
contacted potential BCA instructors in Phoenix. I just checked the
list for you and there are only two instructors listed for
Connecticut:

    Mark Kulungian 203-749-2434
    Joe Sobowicz 860-563-6751

Call them both and talk to them. Also, if you are within a reasonable
drivng distance to a bordering state, try instructors there, too. Most
instructors instruct at a pool room. They have a regular room, but
will also go to a room of your choice. The instructor I chose in
Phoenix instructed from his home. That was the environment I was
looking for, so it worked great for me.

My impression is that the instructors set their own fees because there
was quite a variance in the ones I spoke to. But even the most
expensive was, I thought, reasonable. Their fees may be based on their
instructor level; i.e., and Advanced or Master instructor will charge
more....even though he or she is teaching you beginning level skills.

There are usually three programs of instruction: beginner,
intermediate, and advanced. I had beginner and intermediate, but in a
compressed format because I was only in Phoenix temporarily (on
business). Both levels are an excellent value. There are prerequisites
for advanced instruction, such as having league or tournament
experience.

Go for it, Tim! You won't regret it.


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(updated 1 Sep 97)