miss rule in snooker

miss rule in snooker

Post by Jari Kok » Thu, 15 Dec 1994 08:20:57


The MISS rule - what is it?

The (IBSF and B&SCC) miss rule:

        A miss is when the referee considers the striker
        has not endeavoured to hit a ball on to the best
        of his ability. If this is the case, then the
        offending player, if requested by the next player,
        has to play from the original position all balls
        having been replaced. Note: if the ball on is
        impossible to hit, no miss will be called.

Why is there a miss rule in snooker?

        Because placing your opponent in a snooker is such an
        important part of the game, it has always been required
        of the player to attempt to escape them. Consider
        the situation where you make a beautiful shot and place
        the ball on behind a cluster and leave the cue ball far
        far away. If there was no miss rule, your opponent could
        just smash the cluster open. With a miss rule he
        has no other option but to try and play off cushions and
        maybe foul multiple times giving you a lot of points.

        The rule is an attempt of a way to make players play the
        game like it is supposed to be played and like it has been
        played "always".

What is "impossible to hit"?

        A ball is impossible to hit if a shot can't possibly be
        made in a way that a ball on is hit first without a foul
        being made. For example: the last red is inside a cluster
        of colours and you are on a red. In this case the red is
        impossible to hit and so you can make any shot and a miss
        will not be called.

Why does the rule rely on the opinion of the referee?

        If you have a better way of writing the rule, I am most
        interested to hear of it.

What about the professional miss rule then?

        The WPBSA has decided that a rule that only relies on the
        opinion of the referee is not enough and so they have written
        down some guidelines on when a miss should be called. One
        example is that if a ball on can be seen full-ball with a
        direct hit, the striker must hit a ball on or a miss is
        called. Without this rule, in some cases, the striker might
        choose to play another ball on, maybe in fear of leaving a
        shot to his opponent

What about the future of the miss rule?

        A committee of professional referees has rewritten the rules
        of snooker and the board of the WPBSA have approved that
        rewrite. Once the IBSF also passes the new rules we may see
        a slightly changed miss rule and hopefully one that returns
        the professional rules to be the same as the amateur rules.

What do you know about anything, anyway?

        Maybe I don't!

--
Jari

 
 
 

miss rule in snooker

Post by Michael Beechi » Tue, 20 Dec 1994 19:30:12

regarding the miss rule:

: The (IBSF and B&SCC) miss rule:
:         A miss is when the referee considers the striker
:         has not endeavoured to hit a ball on to the best
:         of his ability. If this is the case, then the
:         offending player, if requested by the next player,
:         has to play from the original position all balls
:         having been replaced.                  ^^^^^^^^^
          ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Has anyone seen this happen when a substantial reorganisation
of the balls has occured? I've seen it occur when a player has
tried to play a deft shot (looked like a good attempt to me!)
and so only the cue ball was replaced. What happens when the
balls are knocked all over the table? I certainly couldn't
remember to any accuracy where all of the balls were.

Michael

 
 
 

miss rule in snooker

Post by Jari Kok » Wed, 21 Dec 1994 02:10:14


Quote:
>Has anyone seen this happen when a substantial reorganisation
>of the balls has occured? I've seen it occur when a player has
>tried to play a deft shot (looked like a good attempt to me!)
>and so only the cue ball was replaced. What happens when the
>balls are knocked all over the table? I certainly couldn't
>remember to any accuracy where all of the balls were.

That is one major weakness of the current rule. As it is, the
referee will replace the balls as well as possible. There have
been suggestions on using video replays as a help, but of
course this won't be available in anything other than the
televised matches. It isn't used there either as far as I know.

Jari