Object ball last or cue ball last aiming

Object ball last or cue ball last aiming

Post by sam » Mon, 15 Nov 1999 04:00:00



says...

Ron, this post does not fully describe the shot you want us to try.  Please post
it again, and I will try both CB Last and OB Last, tomorrow.  Thank you.
Sincerely, Sam

Quote:
>Ken, this is a copy of my previous reply from a couple of weeks ago regarding
>the cut shot and cueball- or objectball-last aiming.  From your recent
>comments, I think you may have missed it.

>$.02 -Ron Shepard

>**********************************


> >Ron, I decided to try out your test [...]

> >I attempted this shot 10 times using "object ball last".  Result:  10
> >Misses, 0 Makes.
> >Then, I attempted this shot 10 times using "cueball last".  Result:  10
> >Misses, 0 Makes.

> I suggest that you move the cue ball down a diamond toward the side pocket and
>try from there.  I think
> that you need a shot that is not too far from 50% success rate for the best
>statistics.  I have done this
> shot before as part of a progressive drill, so I knew already that it was
>about 50% for me.

> BTW, are you left handed?  If you are right handed, I think you will find it
>easier to shoot toward the
> right corner pocket; the table doesn't get in the way of your stance when you
>shoot from left to right.

> >I don't think that the repeated shot idea is appropriate for this question.

> Yes, this is something else that I always do on these drills, so I forgot to
>mention it.  I move the object
> ball around a little bit each shot.  Basically, I keep it between 1 and 2 ball
>radii away from the cushion,
> and within a ball radius of the center diamond one way or the other.  This
>forces  you to go through the
> shot aiming and stick alignment process every time, and keeps you from just
>zoning out and making it
> without even having to look at where the ball is.  In a real situation, you
>don't have the luxury of shooting
> shots over, so during practice sessions, I think it is a good idea to force
>yourself to go though the whole
> process; otherwise, you aren't really practicing what needs to get practiced,
>if you know what I mean.

 
 
 

Object ball last or cue ball last aiming

Post by Ron2 » Tue, 16 Nov 1999 04:00:00

Ken, this is a copy of my previous reply from a couple of weeks ago regarding
the cut shot and cueball- or objectball-last aiming.  From your recent
comments, I think you may have missed it.

$.02 -Ron Shepard

**********************************


 >Ron, I decided to try out your test [...]

 >I attempted this shot 10 times using "object ball last".  Result:  10
 >Misses, 0 Makes.
 >Then, I attempted this shot 10 times using "cueball last".  Result:  10
 >Misses, 0 Makes.

 I suggest that you move the cue ball down a diamond toward the side pocket and
try from there.  I think
 that you need a shot that is not too far from 50% success rate for the best
statistics.  I have done this
 shot before as part of a progressive drill, so I knew already that it was
about 50% for me.

 BTW, are you left handed?  If you are right handed, I think you will find it
easier to shoot toward the
 right corner pocket; the table doesn't get in the way of your stance when you
shoot from left to right.

 >I don't think that the repeated shot idea is appropriate for this question.

 Yes, this is something else that I always do on these drills, so I forgot to
mention it.  I move the object
 ball around a little bit each shot.  Basically, I keep it between 1 and 2 ball
radii away from the cushion,
 and within a ball radius of the center diamond one way or the other.  This
forces  you to go through the
 shot aiming and stick alignment process every time, and keeps you from just
zoning out and making it
 without even having to look at where the ball is.  In a real situation, you
don't have the luxury of shooting
 shots over, so during practice sessions, I think it is a good idea to force
yourself to go though the whole
 process; otherwise, you aren't really practicing what needs to get practiced,
if you know what I mean.

 
 
 

Object ball last or cue ball last aiming

Post by Ron2 » Tue, 16 Nov 1999 04:00:00

Ok, here is the shot description.

Put an object ball near the center diamond on the foot cushion. Don't freeze it
to the cushion, it should be between a ball radius and a ball diameter from the
cushion.  Also, don't place each ball in exactly the same position each time
you repeat the shot, part of the point of this exercise is to go through the
aiming process each time.  Then move the cue ball up the side cushion until you
find a place where you make the shot about half the time.  This will probably
be somewhere around the side pocket or the head string.

Now, from that distance, keep shooting the shot over and over until you have 20
successes.  Keep track of the number of misses.  Aim the shot using
object-ball-last aiming for one set of 20 successes, and then repeat using
cue-ball-last aiming for the other set of 20 successes.  Both sessions should
be from the same distance, of course.

Report the number of misses each way along with the initial cue ball position.

I did this a couple of weeks ago.  I forget my numbers, but I had about twice
as many misses with cue-ball-last (about 50, I think) as I did with
object-ball-last (about 25).  I was shooting from the head string using a rail
bridge on an 8ft table.  There is no doubt that I can aim this shot better with
object-ball-last.  Not only do the stats show this, but I just don't feel
comfortable aiming the other way on this kind of difficult cut shot.  But, I
don't know if this is because there is some intrinsic advantage of
object-ball-last aiming, or if it is simply because that's what I've done for
so long.  So, I figure if everyone gets comparable stats on this shot, even
those who advocate cue-ball-last aiming, then there probably is an intrinsic
advantage to object-ball-last aiming on these difficult shots.  But if some
people have better stats one way, and others have better stats the other way,
then it probably is just another one of those personal choices we all make with
technique (such as *** eye choice, and cue weight, and so on).

$.02 -Ron Shepard