Pattern Play in 14.1 (Was: Best 14.1 player?)

Pattern Play in 14.1 (Was: Best 14.1 player?)

Post by Bob Jewe » Fri, 22 Aug 1997 04:00:00


Quote:

> Does anyone know of any educational material on the wonderful world of
> pattern play?  Byrne gives us thoughts ...  Fels gives us a set of
> guidelines ...  Everyone tells us how to spot a good break ball and a
> good key ball.

And Caras has said that Mosconi was a mediocre player until he learned
to play good patterns, so maybe it is an important part of the game.
Caras said that the way Mosconi did it and a way that you can use is to
work extra *** the best pattern for the last five balls.  (Ideally,
you find the best pattern for all balls left on the table after each
shot, but maybe that is too much calculation.)

Quote:
> Are we left to synthesize our own ideas of what constitutes good
> patterns in any particular situation?

I think so.  There are lots of principles that have appeared in print,
like

   move the cue ball as little as possible
   take care of problems early
   have an escape ball when trying a break-out
   move the object balls minimally
   use side spin minimally
   rely on stop shots and follow shots
   choose shots with options in case plan A fails

Some of it is what sorts of shots you are comfortable with.  Mostly it
is a minimization of effort and risk.  Often it is putting together
two- or three-ball patterns that are part of your best-known repertoire
into longer runs.  I think a lot of it is subconscious; just play a
lot and your patterns get better.

A drill: roll five balls out onto the table and place a break ball,
and plan a pattern with cue ball in hand.

Bob Jewett

 
 
 

Pattern Play in 14.1 (Was: Best 14.1 player?)

Post by Jeffrey Wei » Fri, 22 Aug 1997 04:00:00


Quote:
> ...Another name from the past that starting to show on the Sr. Tour is Larry
> Lisciotti. 1976 World Champion 14.1.  Beat Mizerak out of his title, his
> Balabushka and his money. One of the greatest pattern players of all
> times.

Does anyone know of any educational material on the wonderful world of pattern
play?  Byrne gives us thoughts on break shots and such, as well as ideas like
leaving an angle.  Fels gives us a set of guidelines (wherever-possibles), a
classification scheme (A balls, B balls, etc.), and the idea of running around
the cornermost balls.  Everyone tells us how to spot a good break ball and a
good key ball.

Are we left to synthesize our own ideas of what constitutes good patterns in
any particular situation?  I often hear people saying things like "I don't
shoot as well as I used to, but I can still see the patterns."  What are these
patterns?  What do they look like?  If one's sitting there on the table staring
at me, how do I know it?
--
jw (NYC)

 
 
 

Pattern Play in 14.1 (Was: Best 14.1 player?)

Post by SnookerU » Fri, 22 Aug 1997 04:00:00

Quote:

>A drill: roll five balls out onto the table and place a break ball,
>and plan a pattern with cue ball in hand.

>Bob Jewett

I love it.

-Mark
<Don't read this, it is an empty space>
"Am I a figment of your imagination or are you one of mine?"
My response:
( "I'm sure I could have imagined someone with the answer to that".)
Or, was that you imagining how I would respond?

 
 
 

Pattern Play in 14.1 (Was: Best 14.1 player?)

Post by WCri » Fri, 22 Aug 1997 04:00:00

It is a shame that there aren't as many straight pool players or
tournamnets as there was years ago.  It is an intellectually stimulating
game when you try to clear the balls off in the best possible pattern.

Here are my guidelines (general and basic)

1. Clear off balls on the rails early
2. Clear off balls blocking the path of other balls to the pocket early
3.  Open  up remaining clusters
4.  When  1, 2, and 3 are done think out the remaining table in backwards
sequence.   Break ball,  key ball, key to key,tprior, prior  etc....

 
 
 

Pattern Play in 14.1 (Was: Best 14.1 player?)

Post by R. » Sat, 23 Aug 1997 04:00:00

[lots of good stuff on 14.1 and patterns]

Quote:

> A drill: roll five balls out onto the table and place a break ball,
> and plan a pattern with cue ball in hand.

I agree with everything Bob said here, and would also add as a possible
drill:  play equal offense.  That way you aren't worrying about whether
you run 30, 40, 50 balls.  And you aren't playing the game so as not to
give your opponent a good leave.  You are just playing to make as many
balls as possible.  It's a different strategy than 14.1, but it forces
you to concentrate on nothing but the patterns.  At least, that is my
opinion.

Rob A.