3-C, "Donald in Mathmagic Land"

3-C, "Donald in Mathmagic Land"

Post by Roger Ballenge » Sat, 07 Aug 1999 04:00:00


Hey gang! Anybody ever see the Disney short, "Donald in Mathmagic Land"?
There is a segment explaining the "5" system in 3-cushion billiards. The
demonstrator runs 4 from the break. Of course, when Donald tries it, he gets
it all wrong, and gets very angry...

Roger Ballenger

 
 
 

3-C, "Donald in Mathmagic Land"

Post by Deno J. Andrew » Sun, 08 Aug 1999 04:00:00

Quote:

> Hey gang! Anybody ever see the Disney short, "Donald in Mathmagic Land"?
> There is a segment explaining the "5" system in 3-cushion billiards. The
> demonstrator runs 4 from the break. Of course, when Donald tries it, he gets
> it all wrong, and gets very angry...

I love that part of the movie.  I remember seeing it as a kid in grade
school and thinking it was cool that I was the only person in the class
including the teacher that not only knew what game they were
playing...but already knowing the system!
Deno

 
 
 

3-C, "Donald in Mathmagic Land"

Post by Phat Mac » Sun, 08 Aug 1999 04:00:00

Deno,

I got to watch some of your matches in Las Vegas, and on some of your shots it
looked like you were "putting the numbers on".

But it seemed that you would count the distance between the first and second
object ball (on around-the-table naturals where both balls were near a long rail)
and then find a spot on the second rail. Most of the numbers crunchers that I
know ignore the second rail and concentrate on the first and third rail spots. Do
you have your own system, or was I reading too much into your shot preparation?

Fat Mac

Quote:


> > Hey gang! Anybody ever see the Disney short, "Donald in Mathmagic Land"?
> > There is a segment explaining the "5" system in 3-cushion billiards. The
> > demonstrator runs 4 from the break. Of course, when Donald tries it, he gets
> > it all wrong, and gets very angry...

> I love that part of the movie.  I remember seeing it as a kid in grade
> school and thinking it was cool that I was the only person in the class
> including the teacher that not only knew what game they were
> playing...but already knowing the system!
> Deno


 
 
 

3-C, "Donald in Mathmagic Land"

Post by Deno J. Andrew » Tue, 10 Aug 1999 04:00:00

Quote:

> I got to watch some of your matches in Las Vegas, and on some of your shots it
> looked like you were "putting the numbers on".

> But it seemed that you would count the distance between the first and second
> object ball (on around-the-table naturals where both balls were near a long rail)
> and then find a spot on the second rail. Most of the numbers crunchers that I
> know ignore the second rail and concentrate on the first and third rail spots. Do
> you have your own system, or was I reading too much into your shot preparation?

When both balls are close to the long rail like the shots you refer to,
I find the plus two system to be more accurate thatn the corner system.
So I am really using the plus two modified for hitting the first rail
and then travelling to a point on the second rail.  I usually don't use
systems, but in practice on those tables, I was having a hard time
adjusting, and found that the system worked perfectly for me so I used
it!  That was the only system I used in the tournament except on bank
shots (3 cushions first).

When you get to Chicago, I can show you the system, it is very nice.
Deno J. Andrews

 
 
 

3-C, "Donald in Mathmagic Land"

Post by Robert Byrn » Thu, 12 Aug 1999 04:00:00



Quote:
> Hey gang! Anybody ever see the Disney short, "Donald in Mathmagic Land"?
> There is a segment explaining the "5" system in 3-cushion billiards. The
> demonstrator runs 4 from the break. Of course, when Donald tries it, he
gets
> it all wrong, and gets very angry...

> Roger Ballenger

 
 
 

3-C, "Donald in Mathmagic Land"

Post by Robert Byrn » Thu, 12 Aug 1999 04:00:00

The demonstrator in the old Disney short called Donald Duck in
Mathemagicland is the late Romie Yanez, a very good three-cushion player
who used to own a billiard room at 401 South Main in Los Angeles back in
the 1960s, where such champions as Bill Hynes, John Fitzpatrick, Al
Gilbert, and Gus Copulus used to play.      Robert Byrne