JATSI - dime versus nickel versus ??

JATSI - dime versus nickel versus ??

Post by J Du » Thu, 04 Jan 2001 14:08:04


OK, bear with me for a moment for a bit of hypothetical-reality.

When we consider tip shape, we characterize the radius as a dime or nickel,
knowing it is in the shape of a dome/ball.  Therefore it is crucial to hit
the precise vertical axis that is intended.  But in thinking about it, if
I'm trying to hit a ball with another ball of the exact same radius, it is
very difficult to hit it consistently straight.  So, let's change the shape
of the object hitting the cue ball.  What about if I hit the cue ball with
rolling pin.  With a rolling pin, you have the radius, but only along
horizontal axis.

Let's transfer this concept to a cue tip shape.  Instead of having a dome
shaped tip, have a rolling pin shape.  In essence, you have just widened out
the hitting surface from a millimeter to 13 mm.  Granted, that would make it
so that the tip would have to be perfectly horizontal, but there are already
Red Dot shafts to help with that kind of alignment.  So, with this you
effectively allow a centerball hit to be up to 1/2 tip off center and still
get a centerball hit.  Granted, this would effectively negate left and right
english unless you rotate the shaft, but it would allowing typical follow
and draw shots.  More importantly, as you move further from horizontal
centerline, any deviation off the vertical centerline is exaggerated.  With
a Rolling Pin tip shape, this problem is largely negated.

Anybody ever do any theoretical assessment of this?  Is something like this
even legal?  Other than the obvious sacrificing of side-spin, is there a
practical reason not to do something like this?

--Jim

 
 
 

JATSI - dime versus nickel versus ??

Post by Tony Mathew » Thu, 04 Jan 2001 15:34:11

Quote:

>  Instead of having a dome
> shaped tip, have a rolling pin shape.  In essence, you have just widened out
> the hitting surface from a millimeter to 13 mm.  Granted, that would make it
> so that the tip would have to be perfectly horizontal, but there are already
> Red Dot shafts to help with that kind of alignment.  So, with this you
> effectively allow a centerball hit to be up to 1/2 tip off center and still
> get a centerball hit.  Granted, this would effectively negate left and right
> english unless you rotate the shaft, but it would allowing typical follow
> and draw shots.

Well first off, the penalty for a missaligned shaft may be very high indeed!
Also, you assume that a dome shaped tip has a very small contact area. Try this,
put a lot of chalk on your tip, aim at dead center ball and hit the cue ball
hard. Now measure the size of the dot left by the chalk. This is the contact
area. For a medium tip it can be as big as 4mm in diameter! This is because the
tip compresses when we hit the cueball. A dome shaped hit allows complete
freedom of movement around the cueball, a 12:00 hit is the same as a 3:00 hit.
And you don't have to worry about rotating your cue (not a trivial problem!).

Also, if you want to increase your margin of error for a center ball hit, use a
flatter tip (a quarter radius for example).

And the final 2 reasons for not using a "rolling pin" shaped tip is 1) how the
hell do you shape this with accuracy?
2) the contact area is the same as a dome!

Regards,

Tony