Difficulty finding true center ball.

Difficulty finding true center ball.

Post by Ravelom » Wed, 28 Jan 2004 06:58:27


I am severely myopic and have astigmatism in both eyes. I have always suffered
from a tendency to apply a touch of right english when I think I am hitting
dead center. In the past I have been able to correct this by using the old
'center ball up and down the table and back to the tip of the cue' drill, but
now this has become much more difficult for me. I keep my right (***) eye
centered above the shaft while in my stance and have have even taken to
momentarily shutting my left eye during my practice strokes and using my right
eye only, to verify where the tip is aimed to on the cue ball. This helps
somewhat, but I do not find it to be an entirely satisfactory solution to my
problem. Any suggestions on how to deal with this would be welcome. BTW, I have
scheduled my yearly eye check-up with my opthalmologist and I plan to discuss
this with him to see what he suggests.

Thanks in advance,
Jerry R

 
 
 

Difficulty finding true center ball.

Post by lfiguero » Wed, 28 Jan 2004 07:07:38

Try tilting your head just a tad to the left.

Lou Figueroa


Quote:
> I am severely myopic and have astigmatism in both eyes. I have always
suffered
> from a tendency to apply a touch of right english when I think I am
hitting
> dead center. In the past I have been able to correct this by using the old
> 'center ball up and down the table and back to the tip of the cue' drill,
but
> now this has become much more difficult for me. I keep my right (***)
eye
> centered above the shaft while in my stance and have have even taken to
> momentarily shutting my left eye during my practice strokes and using my
right
> eye only, to verify where the tip is aimed to on the cue ball. This helps
> somewhat, but I do not find it to be an entirely satisfactory solution to
my
> problem. Any suggestions on how to deal with this would be welcome. BTW, I
have
> scheduled my yearly eye check-up with my opthalmologist and I plan to
discuss
> this with him to see what he suggests.

> Thanks in advance,
> Jerry R


 
 
 

Difficulty finding true center ball.

Post by Ravelom » Wed, 28 Jan 2004 07:37:03

Quote:

>Try tilting your head just a tad to the left.

>Lou Figueroa

That seems to be a very sensible solution. I'll definitely give it a try.

Thanks Lou!

Jerry R

 
 
 

Difficulty finding true center ball.

Post by Patrick Johnso » Wed, 28 Jan 2004 07:47:47

This is what I was going to suggest.  Tilt or turn, left or right,
whichever works...

Pat Johnson
Chicago

Quote:

> Try tilting your head just a tad to the left.

> Lou Figueroa



>>I am severely myopic and have astigmatism in both eyes. I have always

> suffered

>>from a tendency to apply a touch of right english when I think I am

> hitting

>>dead center. In the past I have been able to correct this by using the old
>>'center ball up and down the table and back to the tip of the cue' drill,

> but

>>now this has become much more difficult for me. I keep my right (***)

> eye

>>centered above the shaft while in my stance and have have even taken to
>>momentarily shutting my left eye during my practice strokes and using my

> right

>>eye only, to verify where the tip is aimed to on the cue ball. This helps
>>somewhat, but I do not find it to be an entirely satisfactory solution to

> my

>>problem. Any suggestions on how to deal with this would be welcome. BTW, I

> have

>>scheduled my yearly eye check-up with my opthalmologist and I plan to

> discuss

>>this with him to see what he suggests.

>>Thanks in advance,
>>Jerry R

 
 
 

Difficulty finding true center ball.

Post by Donald Tee » Wed, 28 Jan 2004 09:45:38

Quote:

> I am severely myopic and have astigmatism in both eyes. I have always suffered
> from a tendency to apply a touch of right english when I think I am hitting
> dead center. In the past I have been able to correct this by using the old
> 'center ball up and down the table and back to the tip of the cue' drill, but
> now this has become much more difficult for me. I keep my right (***) eye
> centered above the shaft while in my stance and have have even taken to
> momentarily shutting my left eye during my practice strokes and using my right
> eye only, to verify where the tip is aimed to on the cue ball. This helps
> somewhat, but I do not find it to be an entirely satisfactory solution to my
> problem. Any suggestions on how to deal with this would be welcome. BTW, I have
> scheduled my yearly eye check-up with my opthalmologist and I plan to discuss
> this with him to see what he suggests.

> Thanks in advance,
> Jerry R

This might sound a bit weird, Jerry, but one of the reasons I really
like my cuetec is that the colour contrast between the ferrule and the
shaft makes it easy to see. My eyes are getting old too. It is a very
dark shaft, with a white ferrule.  Without that contrast, I have a lot
harder time.

Something you migh consider is fooling arround with various colours of
ferrules.  I have some mylar tape I used to try different combinations.

Donald

 
 
 

Difficulty finding true center ball.

Post by Newspos » Wed, 28 Jan 2004 13:34:53

Quote:

> I am severely myopic and have astigmatism in both eyes.

Do you play with glasses or contacts?

I have heavy astigmatism as well and sometimes have trouble playing
with glasses, especially on any table bigger than a bar box. This is
because of the curvature in my lenses causing some distortion when
bent over a shot. I find that these problems are largely resolved with
using contact lenses.

There are also the obvious mechanical problems, which may be a root
cause in and of themselves, or simply an effect from trying to correct
from a vision problem. If your eyes are giving bad info to your brain,
then your brain is going to command your body to do one or more things
to try and correct.

 
 
 

Difficulty finding true center ball.

Post by Ron Shepar » Wed, 28 Jan 2004 14:15:49


Quote:

> Any suggestions on how to deal with this would be welcome.

Try to find a fairly new, polished, cue ball to practice with.  With
a polished ball you can see the reflection of the tip, ferrule, and
shaft as you stroke.  When you are lined up straight, everything
will look straight in the reflection.  When you are hitting to the
side, then everything looks curved.  This assumes that your problem
is with setup, not with the final stroke.

$.02 -Ron Shepard

 
 
 

Difficulty finding true center ball.

Post by Fast Larry Guning » Wed, 28 Jan 2004 15:05:28

Quote:

> This is what I was going to suggest.  Tilt or turn, left or right,
> whichever works...

> Pat Johnson
> Chicago


> > Try tilting your head just a tad to the left.

> > Lou Figueroa



> >>I am severely myopic and have astigmatism in both eyes. I have always

> > suffered

I have had students who could not find the center of the cue ball.
For them to hit it, I had them hitting a tip left or right of center
to learn where it is.  They had to do that until they retaught their
eye and mind to find it.

Take a stripe object ball, line the outside edges of the stripe so
they are parallel with the two long rails, now lag it down and back up
table.  If you hit the exact center of the ball, the lines on the
stripe keep rolling parallel, if you miss the center, the lines roll
over at once.  This will train you to hit and find center.  Hit the
ball with a level cue and hit in the middle of the ball with a nice
slow follow through, when I do it, the ball goes up and back and stops
on my tip I leave out there, I can do this 10 times in a row with no
problem.

- Show quoted text -

Quote:

> >>from a tendency to apply a touch of right english when I think I am

> > hitting

> >>dead center. In the past I have been able to correct this by using the old
> >>'center ball up and down the table and back to the tip of the cue' drill,

> > but

> >>now this has become much more difficult for me. I keep my right (***)

> > eye

> >>centered above the shaft while in my stance and have have even taken to
> >>momentarily shutting my left eye during my practice strokes and using my

> > right

> >>eye only, to verify where the tip is aimed to on the cue ball. This helps
> >>somewhat, but I do not find it to be an entirely satisfactory solution to

> > my

> >>problem. Any suggestions on how to deal with this would be welcome. BTW, I

> > have

> >>scheduled my yearly eye check-up with my opthalmologist and I plan to

> > discuss

> >>this with him to see what he suggests.

> >>Thanks in advance,
> >>Jerry R

 
 
 

Difficulty finding true center ball.

Post by Play4aBuc » Wed, 28 Jan 2004 15:18:37

I read some where to find the center of the cue ball, you should aim at the
base first (where the cue ball rests, touches the cloth), then raise your
aim.

I know two good players at very different ages that do that.  One guy is in
his late 30's/40's will line up at the base with the back of his cue raised,
then after a few practice strokes at the base he will adjust his back hand
to hit the cueball where he wants, sometimes on his last practice stroke.
The other guy in his 70's, lines up at the base then raises his bridge hand
to adjust the hit.

Cheers,
Jim

Quote:

>I am severely myopic and have astigmatism in both eyes. I have always
suffered
>from a tendency to apply a touch of right english when I think I am hitting
>dead center. In the past I have been able to correct this by using the old
>'center ball up and down the table and back to the tip of the cue' drill,
but
>now this has become much more difficult for me. I keep my right (***)
eye
>centered above the shaft while in my stance and have have even taken to
>momentarily shutting my left eye during my practice strokes and using my
right
>eye only, to verify where the tip is aimed to on the cue ball. This helps
>somewhat, but I do not find it to be an entirely satisfactory solution to
my
>problem. Any suggestions on how to deal with this would be welcome. BTW, I
have
>scheduled my yearly eye check-up with my opthalmologist and I plan to
discuss
>this with him to see what he suggests.

>Thanks in advance,
>Jerry R

 
 
 

Difficulty finding true center ball.

Post by recoveryjon » Wed, 28 Jan 2004 17:52:56

Quote:

> I am severely myopic and have astigmatism in both eyes. I have always suffered
> from a tendency to apply a touch of right english when I think I am hitting
> dead center. In the past I have been able to correct this by using the old
> 'center ball up and down the table and back to the tip of the cue' drill, but
> now this has become much more difficult for me. I keep my right (***) eye
> centered above the shaft while in my stance and have have even taken to
> momentarily shutting my left eye during my practice strokes and using my right
> eye only, to verify where the tip is aimed to on the cue ball. This helps
> somewhat, but I do not find it to be an entirely satisfactory solution to my
> problem. Any suggestions on how to deal with this would be welcome. BTW, I have
> scheduled my yearly eye check-up with my opthalmologist and I plan to discuss
> this with him to see what he suggests.

> Thanks in advance,
> Jerry R

Hi Jerry, Sorry to hear about your eye problems. Apparently Tony
Robles a well known talented professional has vision problems as well
and has learned to compensate.Feel free to checkout this website at:
http://SportToday.org/
(scroll down to EMULATE WITH CAUTION)

Here is a cut and paste of what written about Tony Robles on that
site:

Quote:
Both Robles and Varner have adapted to defects by using techniques
that they never wanted to master but were forced to in order play to
play professional pool. Robles has a vision defect. It took a long
time to diagnose. When he sees the cue tip aimed at the center of the
cue ball, his cue tip is actually 1/2 tip right of center. It is an
optical illusion that he has had to compensate for by shooting all
center ball shots with what appear to him to be 1/2 tip of left
english.(to read the rest go to the above website)

Having shown all of this, the majority of amatuers don't hit center
ball when they think they are.In most cases it 's their stroke
mechanics and to a lesser degree the afformentioned vision
problems.The first time I chalked up my cue and tried to hit dead
center on a Jim Rempe* training ball showed me (chalk mark) that my
stroke needed some work as well.A few lessons form a local pro (John
Horsfell)has me hitting much, much closer to center.I'm not suggesting
mechanics is your problem, however, many of us (reading here) could
use a check up lesson from a QUALIFIED instructor.
*(you can also use a nine ball and aim for the round part of the nine
to check things out)

Some instuctors advocate that most amatuers could improve their
accuracy by shortining their bridges and backstrokes. Apparently the
longer everything is the more the bad stroke fundamentals are
accentuated.Feel free to checkout this site for info on that:

http://SportToday.org/

Other than that , take care and good luck at the eye doctors,RJ

 
 
 

Difficulty finding true center ball.

Post by Bill » Thu, 29 Jan 2004 00:41:58

Quote:

> I am severely myopic and have astigmatism in both eyes. I have always suffered
> from a tendency to apply a touch of right english when I think I am hitting
> dead center. In the past I have been able to correct this by using the old
> 'center ball up and down the table and back to the tip of the cue' drill, but
> now this has become much more difficult for me. I keep my right (***) eye
> centered above the shaft while in my stance and have have even taken to
> momentarily shutting my left eye during my practice strokes and using my right
> eye only, to verify where the tip is aimed to on the cue ball. This helps
> somewhat, but I do not find it to be an entirely satisfactory solution to my
> problem. Any suggestions on how to deal with this would be welcome. BTW, I have
> scheduled my yearly eye check-up with my opthalmologist and I plan to discuss
> this with him to see what he suggests.

> Thanks in advance,
> Jerry R

Jerry...on Jan. 17 I started a thread called "The Eyes Have IT" and
that was also the last day of posting, so maybe it'll give you some
insight.  A week prior to that I had a total prescription change on
both my glasses and contacts, which I thought was going to result in
much better play and has been somewhat of a nightmare. Last night was
the first night in over two weeks that I seem to be making some
breakthroughs and coming back to my old self.  I've literally had to
relearn my entire setup, make multiple changes, reposition my ***
eye directly over the shaft (was center man before), and be ultra
careful of any head tilt one way or another.  The new setup then made
everything in my stroke feel wierd and the hand/eye coordination was
completely off.  It seems like my brain is now having to be rewired
for all of these changes as well as a totally different perspective.
If you now get a new prescription change after your visit, you'll
probably have to start from scratch again also.  BTW, I went back to
my eye doctor immediately after these difficulties and he experimented
with my contacts and I've found that I have to play with a contact
that is 1/4 power weaker in my left eye than what my prescription
calls for.  When I'm not playing, I replace it with the correct
prescription.  I really sympathize with you, it's not fun to go
through.

....................Billy

 
 
 

Difficulty finding true center ball.

Post by Nat » Thu, 29 Jan 2004 06:44:20


with.  With  a polished ball you can see the reflection of the tip, > >
ferrule, and  shaft as you stroke.  When you are lined up straight,
everything  will look straight in the >reflection.  When you are hitting to
the  side, then everything looks curved.  This assumes that your >problem
is with setup, not with the final stroke.

Whew...That certainly sounds good, but while I use the "red circle" CB, I
don't EVER recall seeing a reflection.

Squinting old Nat

 
 
 

Difficulty finding true center ball.

Post by Nat » Thu, 29 Jan 2004 06:48:33


Quote:
> I read some where to find the center of the cue ball, you should aim at
the
> base first (where the cue ball rests, touches the cloth), then raise your
> aim.
> The other guy in his 70's, lines up at the base then raises his bridge
hand
> to adjust the hit.

Yeah, that 's me..."Old Nat".

I'm gonna try that...(wondering  just how one raises the bridge with NO
lateral movenent)...will let you know what happens.

Best,
Nat

 
 
 

Difficulty finding true center ball.

Post by Newspos » Thu, 29 Jan 2004 09:56:35

Quote:


> >Try tilting your head just a tad to the left.

> >Lou Figueroa

> That seems to be a very sensible solution. I'll definitely give it a try.

There is also plain old 1-ball practice. Put the cue ball on the foot
spot and try to roll it in a straight line using a center ball hit.

One Spanish author and carom billiard instructor recommends to the
beginning and intermediate student, 25 each per day of 1 table length
lag with center ball, then 2 table lengths, then 3 and finally 4.

From personal experience, when I was incorporating this drill into my
billiard practice sessions, my tip position and cue ball control
improved dramtically and at all stroke speeds.

 
 
 

Difficulty finding true center ball.

Post by Newspos » Thu, 29 Jan 2004 11:21:20

Quote:

> Some instuctors advocate that most amatuers could improve their
> accuracy by shortining their bridges and backstrokes. Apparently the
> longer everything is the more the bad stroke fundamentals are
> accentuated.

IMHO, this is a great point. Several years ago I bought Hal Mix's
great book directly from him. He was kind enough to respond to a
couple of my letters after I received his book.

One thing Hal mentioned in a letter, was whenever a player would come
to him to help diagnose and solve a problem, one of the first things
Hal said he would look at was bridge length. This included top players
such as Nick Varner.

For pool, I was taught that the bridge loop should be between 9-10
inches from the cue ball. Combined with a 9-10 inch follow-through and
approximately 2 inches for the cue ball, this would make a total
stroke length of about 20 inches. Putting this into practice did
wonders for my game when I played a lot.