9-ball rack (was Q: 8 ball rack)

9-ball rack (was Q: 8 ball rack)

Post by Bob Jewe » Sun, 25 Sep 1994 04:45:58


Quote:
> Is there a corresponding WBA or PBT rule for comparison?  

The PBTA rule book says "the other balls in arbitrary order."

Some people believe that you can make a significant difference in the
difficulty of the run out by placing the balls in a nine ball rack in a
certain order.  I've seen no good demonstration of this, and I have
looked for one.

Bob Jewett

 
 
 

9-ball rack (was Q: 8 ball rack)

Post by Mark Stieffenhof » Sun, 25 Sep 1994 17:37:17

: > Is there a corresponding WBA or PBT rule for comparison?  

: Some people believe that you can make a significant difference in the
: difficulty of the run out by placing the balls in a nine ball rack in a
: certain order.  I've seen no good demonstration of this, and I have
: looked for one.

To combine this with the "giving the 8" question...
Some people place the given ball behind the 1, while others place it in
the rear of the rack. Which is the better place to put it so it's made
least often?

 
 
 

9-ball rack (was Q: 8 ball rack)

Post by Knut-Haavard Aksn » Mon, 26 Sep 1994 01:30:25


Quote:

> corresponding WBA or PBT rule for comparison?
> : Some people believe that you can make a significant difference in
> the : difficulty of the run out by placing the balls in a nine ball
> rack in a : certain order.  I've seen no good demonstration of this,
> and I have : looked for one.
> To combine this with the "giving the 8" question...  Some people
> place the given ball behind the 1, while others place it in the rear
> of the rack. Which is the better place to put it so it's made least
> often?

The most difficult place in the rack except for the 9-ball position is
as the last ball in the rack. A popular game in Sweden is the five and
nine version of nine ball, you play  using normal Texas express rules,
with these differences.

        1.) A normal 9-ball rack is used  with the five racked as last
            ball.
        2.) No 3 fault rule.
        3.) No push out.
        4.) Playing old  style ball in hand  in kitchen when erring on
            the break.
        5.) You gain one point when potting the five using a legal shot.
        6.) You gain two points when potting the nine using a legal shot.
        7.) If the five or nine is potted out of turn they are respotted.
        9.) The person potting the nine as the last object ball on the
            table has the opening break in the next frame.
        8.) The game is played as a race to a predetermined score.

This game  is quite  fun for players   at all levels  and  is easy  to
handicap.  The re-spotting can sometimes creating situations with lots
of combination play. Last week I played  a frame with  a score of 8 in
it: The five went twice and the nine three times.
--

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Name:   Knut-H?vard Aksnes (ECMA 94) or                Knut-Haavard Aksnes (ASCII)
Ericsson signature: HI/ETO/H/ZT KNA             Phone: +47 37 05 14 81

 
 
 

9-ball rack (was Q: 8 ball rack)

Post by Mark Stieffenhof » Mon, 26 Sep 1994 15:40:43

: The most difficult place in the rack except for the 9-ball position is
: as the last ball in the rack. A popular game in Sweden is the five and
: nine version of nine ball, you play  using normal Texas express rules,
: with these differences.

[Rules deleted]

We play sorta the same game here as a 3 person game. Money balls: 5 gets
$1, 9 gets $2.
Pocket both: win $3 from both losers
Pocket just the 9: win $3 from person who didn't make the 5. (Since Mr. 9
and Mr. Loser pays a buck each to Mr. 5, and Mr. 5 gives $2 to Mr. 9.)

Ball in hand in on fouls. No 3 foul rule. Play through until both money
balls are pocketted.

 
 
 

9-ball rack (was Q: 8 ball rack)

Post by Whitney Elfn » Tue, 27 Sep 1994 08:31:05

: : Some people believe that you can make a significant difference in the
: : difficulty of the run out by placing the balls in a nine ball rack in a
: : certain order.  I've seen no good demonstration of this, and I have
: : looked for one.

I think racking the 2and 3 behind the 1 creates a greater opportunity
to run out with a player who breaks leaving the cue in the center of
the table. often the 2 and three will also center up between the spot
and head string as well as the common drift of the 1 toward the side,
opening the table up. Try it and let me know! I will rack this way
against a weaker player to get a better run potential.

: To combine this with the "giving the 8" question...
: Some people place the given ball behind the 1, while others place it in
: the rear of the rack. Which is the better place to put it so it's made
: least often?

In trying to break in the corner ball it is not uncommon to make the
rear ball in the opposite corner and often get a lot of action on the
rear ball. I would think it safer to rack it behind the 1 as you
normally must change your break to try to bank it in the side.

Whit
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    ~  _ <<_     / 'All who wander are not lost'  / |       /   \      |
  ~   /.\>/.\    \     &  'f/8 and be there'      \ |      <     >     |

 
 
 

9-ball rack (was Q: 8 ball rack)

Post by Paul Ha » Thu, 29 Sep 1994 13:25:00

Quote:

>To combine this with the "giving the 8" question...
>Some people place the given ball behind the 1, while others place it in
>the rear of the rack. Which is the better place to put it so it's made
>least often?

There was an article in Billiards Digest a couple years ago (I think) in
which the author took statistics from Accu-Stats videos to determine
what the likely trajectories were of each ball in a 9-ball rack.  When I
get time to dig through my back issues I'll post a citation, unless
someone beats me to it.

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