Snooker rule question

Snooker rule question

Post by Rick » Wed, 05 Jan 2000 04:00:00


I have seen some rules on web sites and  a couple rule books, but still
haven't seen a thorough answer.

quick rule interp: Cue ball jumps table--- cue ball is then placed
inside the 'D' and incoming player proceeds to shoot at his 'on' ball
and there is no restriction of where the 'on' ball has to be located and
can be played wherever it is on the table.

1. Question: can the 'on' ball also be located inside the 'D' area?
2.  Question: does this also apply to a scratched cue ball (pocketed)?
I have not seen these answered specifically anywhere. Of course I know
rules will vary depending on location.
feel free to reply to NG or me
Any clarification is appreciated,,,,,,,TIA,,,,,,,,Rick

 
 
 

Snooker rule question

Post by Don M » Wed, 05 Jan 2000 04:00:00

Quote:

>I have seen some rules on web sites and  a couple rule books, but still
>haven't seen a thorough answer.

>quick rule interp: Cue ball jumps table--- cue ball is then placed
>inside the 'D' and incoming player proceeds to shoot at his 'on' ball
>and there is no restriction of where the 'on' ball has to be located and
>can be played wherever it is on the table.

>1. Question: can the 'on' ball also be located inside the 'D' area?
>2.  Question: does this also apply to a scratched cue ball (pocketed)?
>I have not seen these answered specifically anywhere. Of course I know
>rules will vary depending on location.
>feel free to reply to NG or me
>Any clarification is appreciated,,,,,,,TIA,,,,,,,,Rick

Once the cue ball is spotted inside the D you can shoot in any
direction, including other balls inside the D.

Don >---

 
 
 

Snooker rule question

Post by Andrew Wilsher » Wed, 05 Jan 2000 04:00:00

If a situation arises where the cue ball is ?in hand? [ie where the ball can
be placed manually by the player anywhere he wishes in the D] he may play at
a ball on wherever it may lie on the table. A free ball is only awarded when
the cue ball is in hand, when a ball on cannot be hit full ball from every
possible position in the D.

Hope it answers your question.

Andrew T Wilshere
www.snookerweb.fsnet.co.uk


Quote:
> I have seen some rules on web sites and  a couple rule books, but still
> haven't seen a thorough answer.

> quick rule interp: Cue ball jumps table--- cue ball is then placed
> inside the 'D' and incoming player proceeds to shoot at his 'on' ball
> and there is no restriction of where the 'on' ball has to be located and
> can be played wherever it is on the table.

> 1. Question: can the 'on' ball also be located inside the 'D' area?
> 2.  Question: does this also apply to a scratched cue ball (pocketed)?
> I have not seen these answered specifically anywhere. Of course I know
> rules will vary depending on location.
> feel free to reply to NG or me
> Any clarification is appreciated,,,,,,,TIA,,,,,,,,Rick


 
 
 

Snooker rule question

Post by donald tee » Wed, 05 Jan 2000 04:00:00

Andrew, this free ball stuff is new to me.  Could you explain the rules, and
how they apply?  And when did this rule come into being?  I am back at
snooker after not playing for close to 25 years.

Quote:

>If a situation arises where the cue ball is ?in hand? [ie where the ball
can
>be placed manually by the player anywhere he wishes in the D] he may play
at
>a ball on wherever it may lie on the table. A free ball is only awarded
when
>the cue ball is in hand, when a ball on cannot be hit full ball from every
>possible position in the D.

>Hope it answers your question.

>Andrew T Wilshere
>www.snookerweb.fsnet.co.uk



>> I have seen some rules on web sites and  a couple rule books, but still
>> haven't seen a thorough answer.

>> quick rule interp: Cue ball jumps table--- cue ball is then placed
>> inside the 'D' and incoming player proceeds to shoot at his 'on' ball
>> and there is no restriction of where the 'on' ball has to be located and
>> can be played wherever it is on the table.

>> 1. Question: can the 'on' ball also be located inside the 'D' area?
>> 2.  Question: does this also apply to a scratched cue ball (pocketed)?
>> I have not seen these answered specifically anywhere. Of course I know
>> rules will vary depending on location.
>> feel free to reply to NG or me
>> Any clarification is appreciated,,,,,,,TIA,,,,,,,,Rick

 
 
 

Snooker rule question

Post by Andrew Wilsher » Wed, 05 Jan 2000 04:00:00

If the white ball leaves the table by whatever means it may be [going in to
a pocket, jumping off the table etc] the ball is said to be "in hand". This
means that the player may legally touch the balland place it anywhere in the
D he wants. The white ball is in play again (ie not "in hand") when the
player's cue tip has touched the cue ball - when this happens is ultimately
down to the discretion of the referee.

A side point regarding the free ball - a free ball may only be awarded when
the ball is in hand IF:
any one of the  object ball(s) cannot be hit full ball from ANY position in
the D.

I don't think this rule is new --- just obscure.

Andrew T Wilshere
www.snookerweb.fsnet.co.uk


Quote:
> Andrew, this free ball stuff is new to me.  Could you explain the rules,
and
> how they apply?  And when did this rule come into being?  I am back at
> snooker after not playing for close to 25 years.


> >If a situation arises where the cue ball is ?in hand? [ie where the ball
> can
> >be placed manually by the player anywhere he wishes in the D] he may play
> at
> >a ball on wherever it may lie on the table. A free ball is only awarded
> when
> >the cue ball is in hand, when a ball on cannot be hit full ball from
every
> >possible position in the D.

> >Hope it answers your question.

> >Andrew T Wilshere
> >www.snookerweb.fsnet.co.uk



> >> I have seen some rules on web sites and  a couple rule books, but still
> >> haven't seen a thorough answer.

> >> quick rule interp: Cue ball jumps table--- cue ball is then placed
> >> inside the 'D' and incoming player proceeds to shoot at his 'on' ball
> >> and there is no restriction of where the 'on' ball has to be located
and
> >> can be played wherever it is on the table.

> >> 1. Question: can the 'on' ball also be located inside the 'D' area?
> >> 2.  Question: does this also apply to a scratched cue ball (pocketed)?
> >> I have not seen these answered specifically anywhere. Of course I know
> >> rules will vary depending on location.
> >> feel free to reply to NG or me
> >> Any clarification is appreciated,,,,,,,TIA,,,,,,,,Rick

 
 
 

Snooker rule question

Post by Austin K. William » Wed, 05 Jan 2000 04:00:00

Donald,

Answered by email.

Austin

Quote:

>Andrew, this free ball stuff is new to me.  Could you explain the rules,
and
>how they apply?  And when did this rule come into being?  I am back at
>snooker after not playing for close to 25 years.

 
 
 

Snooker rule question

Post by Mikko J?ntt » Wed, 05 Jan 2000 04:00:00

: Andrew, this free ball stuff is new to me.  Could you explain the rules, and
: how they apply?  And when did this rule come into being?  I am back at
: snooker after not playing for close to 25 years.

 Free ball is awarded when player commits a foul and leaves the opponent
in such a position where the reds cannot be hit with any cut. This means
that you must be able to cut the red(s) as thin as possible from both
sides. If not, it's a free ball. Free ball means that since the red is
unavailable player can shoot any colour as a red and get 1 point from
it. And then continue normally shooting a colour and get normal points
etc.
 These are the official rules of snooker. Please let me know if the
explanation didn't satisfy you.

Regards,
Mikko Jantti
Espoo, Finland
http://www.hut.fi/u/mjantti/

 
 
 

Snooker rule question

Post by Andrew Wilsher » Thu, 06 Jan 2000 04:00:00

Wrong- you must be able to hit the ball on rull ball.


Quote:

> : Andrew, this free ball stuff is new to me.  Could you explain the rules,
and
> : how they apply?  And when did this rule come into being?  I am back at
> : snooker after not playing for close to 25 years.

>  Free ball is awarded when player commits a foul and leaves the opponent
> in such a position where the reds cannot be hit with any cut. This means
> that you must be able to cut the red(s) as thin as possible from both
> sides. If not, it's a free ball. Free ball means that since the red is
> unavailable player can shoot any colour as a red and get 1 point from
> it. And then continue normally shooting a colour and get normal points
> etc.
>  These are the official rules of snooker. Please let me know if the
> explanation didn't satisfy you.

> Regards,
> Mikko Jantti
> Espoo, Finland
> http://www.hut.fi/u/mjantti/

 
 
 

Snooker rule question

Post by Ron Shepa » Thu, 06 Jan 2000 04:00:00


Quote:

> : Andrew, this free ball stuff is new to me.  Could you explain the rules,
and
> : how they apply?  And when did this rule come into being?  I am back at
> : snooker after not playing for close to 25 years.

>  Free ball is awarded when player commits a foul and leaves the opponent
> in such a position where the reds cannot be hit with any cut. This means
> that you must be able to cut the red(s) as thin as possible from both
> sides. If not, it's a free ball. Free ball means that since the red is
> unavailable player can shoot any colour as a red and get 1 point from
> it. And then continue normally shooting a colour and get normal points
> etc.
>  These are the official rules of snooker. Please let me know if the
> explanation didn't satisfy you.

I have a question.  Suppose the player fouls on the break shot without hitting
the pack.  Although he can hit several reds, he cannot cut both sides of any of
them.  So, does he get a free ball in this situation?

What if the breaking player scratches, so that the incoming player gets the cue
ball in the D?  Does he get a free ball then too?

$.02 -Ron Shepard

 
 
 

Snooker rule question

Post by Andrew Wilsher » Thu, 06 Jan 2000 04:00:00

I think that would be a free ball.


Quote:



> > : Andrew, this free ball stuff is new to me.  Could you explain the
rules,
> and
> > : how they apply?  And when did this rule come into being?  I am back at
> > : snooker after not playing for close to 25 years.

> >  Free ball is awarded when player commits a foul and leaves the opponent
> > in such a position where the reds cannot be hit with any cut. This means
> > that you must be able to cut the red(s) as thin as possible from both
> > sides. If not, it's a free ball. Free ball means that since the red is
> > unavailable player can shoot any colour as a red and get 1 point from
> > it. And then continue normally shooting a colour and get normal points
> > etc.
> >  These are the official rules of snooker. Please let me know if the
> > explanation didn't satisfy you.

> I have a question.  Suppose the player fouls on the break shot without
hitting
> the pack.  Although he can hit several reds, he cannot cut both sides of
any of
> them.  So, does he get a free ball in this situation?

> What if the breaking player scratches, so that the incoming player gets
the cue
> ball in the D?  Does he get a free ball then too?

> $.02 -Ron Shepard

 
 
 

Snooker rule question

Post by Austin K. William » Thu, 06 Jan 2000 04:00:00

Ron,

You can't be snookered on a red by a red. If you are prevented from
"thinning" both sides of any red only by other reds, you're not snookered
and therefore no free ball. Keep in mind however that it is always the
player's option to have his opponent play again from where the cue ball
comes to rest after any foul. If scratched, the opponent would have BIH in
the "D" if requested to "play again". FYI

Austin


Quote:



>> : Andrew, this free ball stuff is new to me.  Could you explain the
rules,
>and
>> : how they apply?  And when did this rule come into being?  I am back at
>> : snooker after not playing for close to 25 years.

>>  Free ball is awarded when player commits a foul and leaves the opponent
>> in such a position where the reds cannot be hit with any cut. This means
>> that you must be able to cut the red(s) as thin as possible from both
>> sides. If not, it's a free ball. Free ball means that since the red is
>> unavailable player can shoot any colour as a red and get 1 point from
>> it. And then continue normally shooting a colour and get normal points
>> etc.
>>  These are the official rules of snooker. Please let me know if the
>> explanation didn't satisfy you.

>I have a question.  Suppose the player fouls on the break shot without
hitting
>the pack.  Although he can hit several reds, he cannot cut both sides of
any of
>them.  So, does he get a free ball in this situation?

>What if the breaking player scratches, so that the incoming player gets the
cue
>ball in the D?  Does he get a free ball then too?

>$.02 -Ron Shepard