A newbie asks, Squirt?

A newbie asks, Squirt?

Post by fl.. » Tue, 14 Jan 1997 04:00:00


What is squirt and how do you tell how much or how little a given stick has?
From reading this ng there seems to be way more to buying that first stick
than I had realized. Any advice on a book  to explain all the basics?

 
 
 

A newbie asks, Squirt?

Post by Ron Shepa » Wed, 15 Jan 1997 04:00:00


Quote:

>What is squirt and how do you tell how much or how little a given stick has?
>From reading this ng there seems to be way more to buying that first stick
>than I had realized. Any advice on a book  to explain all the basics?

Look for the FAQ at, among other places, http://www.accessone.com/~mavlon/
(as of this posting, look for item 161).  With the possible exception of
quality of contruction, many experienced players think that squirt is the
most important issue when buying a cue stick.

$.02 -Ron Shepard

 
 
 

A newbie asks, Squirt?

Post by Altha » Fri, 17 Jan 1997 04:00:00

Dear Newbie,
book: basics: get Byrne's "Standard Book of Pool and Billiards"
later get Capelle's "Play Your Best Pool"
Squirt: the tendency for the cue ball to move directly away from wherever
the cue tip strikes it, especially if struck hard.  Thus when applying
right english (hitting say 1/3 inch to the right of center) the cue will
shoot slightly left of where you are aiming.  However this effect is
somewhat cancelled by the fact that a ball struck with right english will
generally travel to the right of the line of aim.  As far as testing is
concerned, most formula's given here are too complex for newbies, in fact,
too complex for me, an oldbie!  I'd say any good stick (Adams or Viking to
save money, McDermott or Joss to spend money) should be fine.  Don't get
hung up on weird concepts.  A good player can play well with any stick.

 
 
 

A newbie asks, Squirt?

Post by Bob Jewe » Fri, 17 Jan 1997 04:00:00

: What is squirt and how do you tell how much or how little a given
: stick has?

Here is the new test in the FAQ for squirt.  This replaces the previous
test with which many people had problems.  (Suggestions on improving
clarity solicited.)

    The "aim-and-pivot" method of squirt compensation.

    For each cue stick, there is a particular length of bridge for
    which you can aim straight at a close object ball and then pivot
    about your bridge hand and shoot straight through the new line and
    hit the object ball full.  (You can also use this (very old) method
    for non-full shots too, but a full shot is best for finding the
    right bridge length.)  For a stick you want to measure, just find
    the needed bridge length.  A hint: if you shoot softly at a ball
    far away, the cue ball will curve on its way to the object ball,
    and your measurement will be useless.  Do not give the cue ball the
    time or distance to curve.  Shoot firmly.  Use as much side spin
    as you can without miscuing.  The shorter the bridge, the more
    squirt the stick has.

Bob Jewett

 
 
 

A newbie asks, Squirt?

Post by Ron Shepa » Fri, 17 Jan 1997 04:00:00

Quote:


>: What is squirt and how do you tell how much or how little a given
>: stick has?

>Here is the new test in the FAQ for squirt.  This replaces the previous
>test with which many people had problems.  (Suggestions on improving
>clarity solicited.)

>    The "aim-and-pivot" method of squirt compensation.

>    For each cue stick, there is a particular length of bridge for
>    which you can aim straight at a close object ball and then pivot
>    about your bridge hand and shoot straight through the new line and
>    hit the object ball full.  (You can also use this (very old) method
>    for non-full shots too, but a full shot is best for finding the
>    right bridge length.)  For a stick you want to measure, just find
>    the needed bridge length.  A hint: if you shoot softly at a ball
>    far away, the cue ball will curve on its way to the object ball,
>    and your measurement will be useless.  Do not give the cue ball the
>    time or distance to curve.  Shoot firmly.  Use as much side spin
>    as you can without miscuing.  The shorter the bridge, the more
>    squirt the stick has.

Looks good to me.  I suggest that you include both methods of testing in
the FAQ.  Maybe you could number them, Test #1 and Test #2.  The problem
with Test #1 has always been that swerve contaminates the results.  The
problem with Test #2 is that many sticks will have a pivot point near the
joint, so it is difficult to stroke with such a long bridge.  Perhaps you
could mention that it is alright to slide the bridge hand forward after
the pivot, while being very careful not to move the stick; in this case it
is the distance from the cue ball to the pivot point that is important,
not the final bridge length.

$.02 -Ron Shepard

 
 
 

A newbie asks, Squirt?

Post by phil freedenber » Fri, 17 Jan 1997 04:00:00

Bob==
Please clarify this into a step by step procedure. Thanx

==Phil F



Quote:

> : What is squirt and how do you tell how much or how little a given
> : stick has?

> Here is the new test in the FAQ for squirt.  This replaces the previous
> test with which many people had problems.  (Suggestions on improving
> clarity solicited.)

>     The "aim-and-pivot" method of squirt compensation.

>     For each cue stick, there is a particular length of bridge for
>     which you can aim straight at a close object ball and then pivot
>     about your bridge hand and shoot straight through the new line and
>     hit the object ball full.  (You can also use this (very old) method
>     for non-full shots too, but a full shot is best for finding the
>     right bridge length.)  For a stick you want to measure, just find
>     the needed bridge length.  A hint: if you shoot softly at a ball
>     far away, the cue ball will curve on its way to the object ball,
>     and your measurement will be useless.  Do not give the cue ball the
>     time or distance to curve.  Shoot firmly.  Use as much side spin
>     as you can without miscuing.  The shorter the bridge, the more
>     squirt the stick has.

> Bob Jewett

 
 
 

A newbie asks, Squirt?

Post by Jeffrey Weis » Sat, 18 Jan 1997 04:00:00


Quote:
> ... I'd say any good stick (Adams or Viking to save money, McDermott or Joss
> to spend money) should be fine.  Don't get hung up on weird concepts.  A good
> player can play well with any stick.

Well, Andy, I agree with most of what you're saying, except....I'd venture that
a "newbie" may play a bit better, and learn a little faster with a more
accurate stick.  Especially when (s)he's first experimenting with English.

PS:  Everyone congratulate Andy for winning his first league match this week!
     (Are we blushing now?)
--
jw

 
 
 

A newbie asks, Squirt?

Post by Bob Jewe » Sat, 18 Jan 1997 04:00:00

: Please clarify this into a step by step procedure. Thanx

Well, it sort of is in a step by step procedure, but I wanted
to keep it in a non-list style.  The steps are:

  1. get a stick, two balls, and table
  2. select a bridge length
  3. place the cue ball about a diamond from the object ball
  4. aim full at the object ball
  5. without moving the bridge hand, pivot the line of the stick
     to get a lot of side spin
  6. shoot straight through the new line firmly
  7. notice whether the cue ball goes to the right or left
  8. adjust the bridge length to decrease the cue ball movement
     (that adjusting the bridge length does this is the amazing part)
  9. go back to 3 until the cue ball sits spinning in place after
     the shot

Would this be clearer?

Bob Jewett

: For each cue stick, there is a particular length of bridge for
: which you can aim straight at a close object ball and then pivot
: about your bridge hand and shoot straight through the new line and
: hit the object ball full.  (You can also use this (very old) method
: for non-full shots too, but a full shot is best for finding the
: right bridge length.)  For a stick you want to measure, just find
: the needed bridge length.  A hint: if you shoot softly at a ball
: far away, the cue ball will curve on its way to the object ball,
: and your measurement will be useless.  Do not give the cue ball the
: time or distance to curve.  Shoot firmly.  Use as much side spin
: as you can without miscuing.  The shorter the bridge, the more
: squirt the stick has.