Antique help needed

Antique help needed

Post by Jete » Sat, 22 Jan 2000 04:00:00


We are having the fire department table recovered and have discovered some of
the rail bolts wont tighten. Does anyone know any way to repair or replace the
inserts? The table is a 1900-1915 Brunswick 8 footer with 4 little slates.

Thanks in advance for your expertise.

-Pete

 
 
 

Antique help needed

Post by Mark » Sat, 22 Jan 2000 04:00:00

I think you can get replacement inserts at Mueller Sporting Goods.

--
Mark0

?o`o?,,,,?o`o?,,,,?o`o?,,,,?o`o?o`o?,,,,?o

The statement below is true...
The statement above is false...

?o`o?,,,,?o`o?,,,,?o`o?,,,,?o`o?o`o?,,,,?o


Quote:
> We are having the fire department table recovered and have discovered some
of
> the rail bolts wont tighten. Does anyone know any way to repair or replace
the
> inserts? The table is a 1900-1915 Brunswick 8 footer with 4 little slates.

> Thanks in advance for your expertise.

> -Pete


 
 
 

Antique help needed

Post by Deadstro » Sat, 22 Jan 2000 04:00:00

Quote:
>ubject: Antique help needed

>Date: Thu, 20 January 2000 10:24 PM EST

>We are having the fire department table recovered and have discovered some of
>the rail bolts wont tighten. Does anyone know any way to repair or replace
>the
>inserts? The table is a 1900-1915 Brunswick 8 footer with 4 little slates.

>Thanks in advance for your expertise.

>-Pete

I was under the impression that Brunswick used a four piece slate prior to 1900
and changed to three piece in 1900?  As for the bolts, I've replaced them with
a lag type bolt and was able to tighten them more than the antique style bolts.

Jim Halladay

 
 
 

Antique help needed

Post by Jete » Sat, 22 Jan 2000 04:00:00

I was under the impression that Brunswick used a four piece slate prior to 1900
and changed to three piece in 1900?  As for the bolts, I've replaced them with
a lag type bolt and was able to tighten them more than the antique style bolts.

Jim Halladay

You are probably right, Jim.  I was going by the emblem and the replacement
offered in Mueller's which, if you're right,  would mean it's between 1895 and
1900.
Hey, I learned something.

Lag bolts.  We'll have a look and see.

Thanks,

Pete

 
 
 

Antique help needed

Post by Mark » Sat, 22 Jan 2000 04:00:00

A mig welder can give you a few more pounds of torque too.  After all you
wouldn't want to *restore* an antique......

Mark0   <--Pass the duct tape

Quote:
> >ubject: Antique help needed

> >Date: Thu, 20 January 2000 10:24 PM EST

> >We are having the fire department table recovered and have discovered
some of
> >the rail bolts wont tighten. Does anyone know any way to repair or
replace
> >the
> >inserts? The table is a 1900-1915 Brunswick 8 footer with 4 little
slates.

> >Thanks in advance for your expertise.

> >-Pete

> I was under the impression that Brunswick used a four piece slate prior to
1900
> and changed to three piece in 1900?  As for the bolts, I've replaced them
with
> a lag type bolt and was able to tighten them more than the antique style
bolts.

> Jim Halladay

 
 
 

Antique help needed

Post by Pierce D. Gil » Sat, 22 Jan 2000 04:00:00

The rail bolts thread into a soft metal insert anchored in the slate
most anyone who is marginally handy should be able to repair them, or make
new ones for you

there are two choices worth considering:
  1. If and ONLY if, you can beg, borrow or improvise a tap that matches the
threads on the rail bolt
             then,
                slop some of that *metal* epoxy suff into the worn insert
                re-tap the insert
at that point you should be fine - problem is getting the right tap *not a
trivial concern

    2. <for the more adventurous and/or table mechanic competent>
         remove the slate and flip over onto its back
         the area where the inserts have been put in should be obvious by
the filler residue
         chisel out the old insert and put in a new one
         redo the seal using a good concrete patch material <no more
difficult than doing drywall repair>
         put it all back together - again not trivial due to the seam
         that runs right to the middle of the center pockets

hope this helps
Dale  - you can email me if you have more questions

Quote:

>We are having the fire department table recovered and have discovered some
of
>the rail bolts wont tighten. Does anyone know any way to repair or replace
the
>inserts? The table is a 1900-1915 Brunswick 8 footer with 4 little slates.

>Thanks in advance for your expertise.

>-Pete

 
 
 

Antique help needed

Post by Rob » Sat, 22 Jan 2000 04:00:00

I had 2 missing bolts and the threads were stripped on an
old Brunswick.  I made pea sized lumps of epoxy and rammed
them into the hole and packed them in with a dowel.  I
drilled and tapped a 3/8 X 16 thread per inch thread and
used a modern bolt.  I need to drill & tap the head to put
a coverlet over the bolt head to hide it.  The original
bolts were 3/8 X 14 TPI which is an obsolete style and
would need to be made on a lathe.

* Sent from AltaVista http://www.altavista.com Where you can also find related Web Pages, Images, Audios, Videos, News, and Shopping.  Smart is Beautiful

 
 
 

Antique help needed

Post by Mark » Sun, 23 Jan 2000 04:00:00

Good post.

Mark0    <--He forgot to mention a nail gun.....


Quote:
> The rail bolts thread into a soft metal insert anchored in the slate
> most anyone who is marginally handy should be able to repair them, or make
> new ones for you

> there are two choices worth considering:
>   1. If and ONLY if, you can beg, borrow or improvise a tap that matches
the
> threads on the rail bolt
>              then,
>                 slop some of that *metal* epoxy suff into the worn insert
>                 re-tap the insert
> at that point you should be fine - problem is getting the right tap *not a
> trivial concern

>     2. <for the more adventurous and/or table mechanic competent>
>          remove the slate and flip over onto its back
>          the area where the inserts have been put in should be obvious by
> the filler residue
>          chisel out the old insert and put in a new one
>          redo the seal using a good concrete patch material <no more
> difficult than doing drywall repair>
>          put it all back together - again not trivial due to the seam
>          that runs right to the middle of the center pockets

> hope this helps
> Dale  - you can email me if you have more questions


> >We are having the fire department table recovered and have discovered
some
> of
> >the rail bolts wont tighten. Does anyone know any way to repair or
replace
> the
> >inserts? The table is a 1900-1915 Brunswick 8 footer with 4 little
slates.

> >Thanks in advance for your expertise.

> >-Pete

 
 
 

Antique help needed

Post by Jete » Sun, 23 Jan 2000 04:00:00

Quote:

>Date: Fri, 21 January 2000 12:37 AM EST

>I had 2 missing bolts and the threads were stripped on an
>old Brunswick.  I made pea sized lumps of epoxy and rammed
>them into the hole and packed them in with a dowel.  I
>drilled and tapped a 3/8 X 16 thread per inch thread and
>used a modern bolt.  I need to drill & tap the head to put
>a coverlet over the bolt head to hide it.  The original
>bolts were 3/8 X 14 TPI which is an obsolete style and
>would need to be made on a lathe.

Thanks Rob,

I think all the inserts are there. Some of them are spinning in the slate.  It
is good to know as much about what I am dealing with as possible.

-Pete

 
 
 

Antique help needed

Post by CRSRI » Mon, 24 Jan 2000 04:00:00

Hey does the table have green slate?   If it does I believe that's Vermont
slate. I did an old 1900's table a while ago that had Vermont slate (beautiful
stuff) but the table had no name on it. The bolts went right into the slates
and all anchored well .... I guess we were lucky.
Hope your project goes well.
-Chris in PA
 
 
 

Antique help needed

Post by Jete » Mon, 24 Jan 2000 04:00:00

Quote:

>Date: Sat, 22 January 2000 08:38 PM EST

>Hey does the table have green slate?   If it does I believe that's Vermont
>slate.

I believe those are the green mountains, the slate's pretty much grey.  Try
again though, if you keep talking long enough eventually you will say something
funny.
 
 
 

Antique help needed

Post by Pierce D. Gil » Mon, 24 Jan 2000 04:00:00

Quote:


>>Date: Sat, 22 January 2000 08:38 PM EST

>>Hey does the table have green slate?   If it does I believe that's Vermont
>>slate.

>I believe those are the green mountains, the slate's pretty much grey.  Try
>again though, if you keep talking long enough eventually you will say
something
>funny.

not to be a smartass but, Vermont slate is green <greenish>
at least that was what I was told by one antique table guru I consulted when
researching one of mine.
Gray slate from an early 1900*s table is most likely to be from Pennsylvania

Dale

 
 
 

Antique help needed

Post by donald tee » Mon, 24 Jan 2000 04:00:00

That is interesting ... I ran into a table (1 1/2" greenish slate, snooker
table) a few weeks back, and had never seen slate of that colour before.  It
was about 75 years old, and made by Brunswick.

Quote:

>Hey does the table have green slate?   If it does I believe that's Vermont
>slate. I did an old 1900's table a while ago that had Vermont slate
(beautiful
>stuff) but the table had no name on it. The bolts went right into the
slates
>and all anchored well .... I guess we were lucky.
>Hope your project goes well.
>-Chris in PA

 
 
 

Antique help needed

Post by Jete » Mon, 24 Jan 2000 04:00:00

Quote:
>Antique help needed

>Date: Sun, 23 January 2000 02:09 AM EST



>>>Date: Sat, 22 January 2000 08:38 PM EST

>>>Hey does the table have green slate?   If it does I believe that's Vermont
>>>slate.

>>I believe those are the green mountains, the slate's pretty much grey.  Try
>>again though, if you keep talking long enough eventually you will say
>something
>>funny.

>not to be a smartass but, Vermont slate is green <greenish>
>at least that was what I was told by one antique table guru I consulted when
>researching one of mine.
>Gray slate from an early 1900*s table is most likely to be from Pennsylvania

>Dale

Oh well, looks like I spoke without knowing what I'm talking about.  
Apologies to CRSRIK7...

-Pete

 
 
 

Antique help needed

Post by Stone » Tue, 25 Jan 2000 04:00:00

Saw an episode of This Old House yesterday.  They were working on a
slate roof and using 'Vermont slate'.  It is gray but it definitely does
have a greenish cast to it.

Regards,
Stoney <-----Reporting with These Old Eyes

Quote:
> >>>Hey does the table have green slate?   If it does I believe that's Vermont
> >>>slate.

> >>I believe those are the green mountains, the slate's pretty much grey.  Try
> >>again though, if you keep talking long enough eventually you will say
> >something
> >>funny.

> >not to be a smartass but, Vermont slate is green <greenish>
> >at least that was what I was told by one antique table guru I consulted when
> >researching one of mine.
> >Gray slate from an early 1900*s table is most likely to be from Pennsylvania

> >Dale

> Oh well, looks like I spoke without knowing what I'm talking about.
> Apologies to CRSRIK7...

> -Pete