Hey old-timers... seen leather flap on racks?

Hey old-timers... seen leather flap on racks?

Post by swed » Mon, 06 Jan 2003 07:14:57


Hi fellow old-timers!

I was just thinking back  to my younger years in pool halls and it came to
me that one hall in particular some 40 plus years ago had a flap attached to
one side of their racks. The flap was made of thin leather(or maybe vinyl).
It was as large as the rack and the rack boy would have the flap under the
rack and place the balls in the rack with the flap under them. He would then
pull the rack back toward himself, slightly lift the back edge of the rack
up off the table, and then push forwrd and the flap would roll out from
underneath the balls and the rack then positioned on the spot for the break.

Has anyone else seen this before? I'm not sure why they did that. Maybe to
protect the cloth in that area or to dislodge any grit  or dust or chaulk
from the balls before the break.

Any ideas?

Swede

 
 
 

Hey old-timers... seen leather flap on racks?

Post by Rich Shewmake » Mon, 06 Jan 2003 08:40:37

--


Quote:
> Hi fellow old-timers!

> I was just thinking back  to my younger years in pool halls and it came to
> me that one hall in particular some 40 plus years ago had a flap attached
to
> one side of their racks. The flap was made of thin leather(or maybe
vinyl).
> It was as large as the rack and the rack boy would have the flap under the
> rack and place the balls in the rack with the flap under them. He would
then
> pull the rack back toward himself, slightly lift the back edge of the rack
> up off the table, and then push forwrd and the flap would roll out from
> underneath the balls and the rack then positioned on the spot for the
break.

> Has anyone else seen this before? I'm not sure why they did that. Maybe to
> protect the cloth in that area or to dislodge any grit  or dust or chaulk
> from the balls before the break.

> Any ideas?

> Swede

I know a pool hall where they do that now. But  I doubt that it would work
if the house is not racking the balls. The boys down at the bar would not
only not use the device, they would probably rip it off the rack before the
end of the first night. The place I'm referring to has bibs of pool cloth,
not leather.

--Rich

 
 
 

Hey old-timers... seen leather flap on racks?

Post by al con » Mon, 06 Jan 2003 10:27:40

The flap you refer to is called the " Triangle Apron "

 
 
 

Hey old-timers... seen leather flap on racks?

Post by Fred Agni » Tue, 07 Jan 2003 00:50:08


Quote:

> Has anyone else seen this before? I'm not sure why they did that. Maybe to
> protect the cloth in that area or to dislodge any grit  or dust or chaulk
> from the balls before the break.

I'm not an old-timer, but I have seen several of these in older pool halls.
I was told that it was to protect the cloth when you throw the balls in the
rack. When you push the rack forward, the leather sort of peels it way out
from under the rack.

Fred

 
 
 

Hey old-timers... seen leather flap on racks?

Post by Brian Bade » Tue, 07 Jan 2003 03:25:05

Are there any pictures of this on the internet anywhere?
Regards,
Brian


Quote:
> Hi fellow old-timers!

> I was just thinking back  to my younger years in pool halls and it came to
> me that one hall in particular some 40 plus years ago had a flap attached
to
> one side of their racks. The flap was made of thin leather(or maybe
vinyl).
> It was as large as the rack and the rack boy would have the flap under the
> rack and place the balls in the rack with the flap under them. He would
then
> pull the rack back toward himself, slightly lift the back edge of the rack
> up off the table, and then push forwrd and the flap would roll out from
> underneath the balls and the rack then positioned on the spot for the
break.

> Has anyone else seen this before? I'm not sure why they did that. Maybe to
> protect the cloth in that area or to dislodge any grit  or dust or chaulk
> from the balls before the break.

> Any ideas?

> Swede

 
 
 

Hey old-timers... seen leather flap on racks?

Post by MIKE JANI » Wed, 08 Jan 2003 10:24:15

Quote:

> Are there any pictures of this on the internet anywhere?

Brian, I haven't seen any picture of it anywhere but one of my friends has
one on the table at his house.  it is simply made.

1st you cut the cloth to the size of 1 side of the rack, leaving avout 1
extra inch on the back.
2. you attach the cloth under the rack and use the side with the extra inch
or soo and attach it to any wooden rack with tacks or heavy duty staples.

As stated erliar the cloth is used to minimize damage to the cloth on your
table.  Most people put the rack against the back rail when racking the
balls then push the rack forward to the spot.  On may tables you can notice
the cloth wear by way of heavy lines or indents.

the rack is used as stated in the 1st post

Quote:
> pull the rack back toward himself, slightly lift the back edge of the rack
> up off the table, and then push forwrd and the flap would roll out from
> underneath the balls and the rack then positioned on the spot for the

break.

Try to make one with some old cloth and an old woodeb rack.  It's pretty
simple.

--
Mike Janis
The Viking Cue 9-Ball Tour
1-800-200-POOL


Viking Tour Information - link below
http://www.vikingcue.com/9balltour.htm

 
 
 

Hey old-timers... seen leather flap on racks?

Post by Otto » Wed, 08 Jan 2003 10:34:04

I am visually challenged and can not see this.

Tacks or heavy duty staples on the bottom of my rack and dragging it across
my table?

Anyone have a link to a pic?

Otto--visually challenged  :>)


Quote:
> 1st you cut the cloth to the size of 1 side of the rack, leaving avout 1
> extra inch on the back.
> 2. you attach the cloth under the rack and use the side with the extra
inch
> or soo and attach it to any wooden rack with tacks or heavy duty staples.

 
 
 

Hey old-timers... seen leather flap on racks?

Post by Steve Elli » Wed, 08 Jan 2003 10:51:35

Quote:

>I am visually challenged and can not see this.

>Tacks or heavy duty staples on the bottom of my rack and dragging it across
>my table?

>Anyone have a link to a pic?

>Otto--visually challenged  :>)

I think I can visualize the rack, the tacks or staples go on the side of the rack not in contact
with the table. I just can't visualize how you use it without sending the balls all over hell's
kitchen.
Steve <-- Would probably be too clumsy to use it even if he had it.
Quote:



>> 1st you cut the cloth to the size of 1 side of the rack, leaving avout 1
>> extra inch on the back.
>> 2. you attach the cloth under the rack and use the side with the extra
>inch
>> or soo and attach it to any wooden rack with tacks or heavy duty staples.

 
 
 

Hey old-timers... seen leather flap on racks?

Post by Patrick Johnso » Wed, 08 Jan 2003 11:00:03

Quote:
> I am visually challenged and can not see this.

I've never seen one, but it can only be one thing: Imagine an *unattached* piece
of cloth/leather/whatever, slightly bigger than the rack, that you place on the
table, then put the rack on top of, then place the balls in the rack, then slide
the rack forward to the spot, leaving the cloth where it is.  For convenience,
leave a little extra cloth to fold up and attach to the back *side* of the rack
so their always together.  Since only the back edge is attached, it will still
stay behind when the balls are rolled forward with the rack.  Viola.

Of course, this only protects the surface where the cloth initially sits
(probably right against the foot rail).  The surface forward of that remains
unprotected, and that's where most of the wear is -- especially where the balls
are finally racked.

Pat Johnson
Chicago

 
 
 

Hey old-timers... seen leather flap on racks?

Post by Otto » Wed, 08 Jan 2003 23:13:18


Quote:
>Snipped Pat's explanation<

Aaaaahhhhhh.

Light bulb is now on.

Thanks.

Otto

 
 
 

Hey old-timers... seen leather flap on racks?

Post by Dixiedo » Thu, 09 Jan 2003 11:05:40

Hi Swede,

Yes, I remember those triangle aprons very well.  I used to play at a large
room in Pittsburgh, PA in the late 50's/early 60's where they were used on
every table.  The aprons were cut from pool cloth, and they did protect the
foot of the table where the balls were dropped into the rack before being
scooted up to the footspot.  Of course most rooms were charging by the game
then, so they needed a rack boy to collect the coins after each game, and to
rack the bals for the ensuing game.  I played at one room where 8-ball and
9-ball were a dime; rotation was 15 cents; and if you played straight pool
it was 60 cents per hour.

When rooms started charging by the hour exclusively, the use of rack boys
gradually faded out.  Without rack boys, players found the triangle aprons
cumbersome, so their use also faded out.

I miss those old rooms.  Spittoons were still in use for the tobacco
chewers.  There were no TVs, juke boxes were rare, and there were no women.
There was just pool and billiards.  There was always some guy on the pay
phone in the corner talking to his bookie, and there were usually guys
sitting around sweating games and talking pool.  Now the music is so loud in
most joints that you couldn't carry on a conversation if you wanted to; and
cell phones have replaced pay phones.

Thanks for the memory!

Doc


Quote:
> Hi fellow old-timers!

> I was just thinking back  to my younger years in pool halls and it came to
> me that one hall in particular some 40 plus years ago had a flap attached
to
> one side of their racks. The flap was made of thin leather(or maybe
vinyl).
> It was as large as the rack and the rack boy would have the flap under the
> rack and place the balls in the rack with the flap under them. He would
then
> pull the rack back toward himself, slightly lift the back edge of the rack
> up off the table, and then push forwrd and the flap would roll out from
> underneath the balls and the rack then positioned on the spot for the
break.

> Has anyone else seen this before? I'm not sure why they did that. Maybe to
> protect the cloth in that area or to dislodge any grit  or dust or chaulk
> from the balls before the break.

> Any ideas?

> Swede

 
 
 

Hey old-timers... seen leather flap on racks?

Post by swed » Thu, 09 Jan 2003 13:05:04



Quote:
> Hi Swede,

> Yes, I remember those triangle aprons very well.  I used to play at a large
> room in Pittsburgh, PA in the late 50's/early 60's where they were used on
> every table.  The aprons were cut from pool cloth, and they did protect the
> foot of the table where the balls were dropped into the rack before being
> scooted up to the footspot.  Of course most rooms were charging by the game
> then, so they needed a rack boy to collect the coins after each game, and to
> rack the bals for the ensuing game.  I played at one room where 8-ball and
> 9-ball were a dime; rotation was 15 cents; and if you played straight pool
> it was 60 cents per hour.

> When rooms started charging by the hour exclusively, the use of rack boys
> gradually faded out.  Without rack boys, players found the triangle aprons
> cumbersome, so their use also faded out.

> I miss those old rooms.  Spittoons were still in use for the tobacco
> chewers.  There were no TVs, juke boxes were rare, and there were no women.
> There was just pool and billiards.  There was always some guy on the pay
> phone in the corner talking to his bookie, and there were usually guys
> sitting around sweating games and talking pool.  Now the music is so loud in
> most joints that you couldn't carry on a conversation if you wanted to; and
> cell phones have replaced pay phones.

> Thanks for the memory!

> Doc



>> Hi fellow old-timers!

>> I was just thinking back  to my younger years in pool halls and it came to
>> me that one hall in particular some 40 plus years ago had a flap attached
> to
>> one side of their racks. The flap was made of thin leather(or maybe
> vinyl).
>> It was as large as the rack and the rack boy would have the flap under the
>> rack and place the balls in the rack with the flap under them. He would
> then
>> pull the rack back toward himself, slightly lift the back edge of the rack
>> up off the table, and then push forwrd and the flap would roll out from
>> underneath the balls and the rack then positioned on the spot for the
> break.

>> Has anyone else seen this before? I'm not sure why they did that. Maybe to
>> protect the cloth in that area or to dislodge any grit  or dust or chaulk
>> from the balls before the break.

>> Any ideas?

>> Swede

You're welcome Doc...

I was*** around the same ol' place with the SAME old tables...three
owners later. A dime a rack is what I remember also for 8 ball. You'd call
out "rackem" and the rack 'boy' what come running back and rack. Sometimes
the fulltime bartender would have to come back to rack...they always came
arunning back though right away.  The same old tables are still there with
probably the same balls!!!  They're in very bad shape after these many years
of use since the early 60s.

No TVs, or video games..a few pinball machines tho. The juke box was not as
loud as today.

Things weren't quite as strict back then, because the law didn't mind having
minors in the place for playing pool and drinking soda pop.

Yes-Great memories Doc!!  

 
 
 

Hey old-timers... seen leather flap on racks?

Post by Rich Shewmake » Thu, 09 Jan 2003 19:47:40

--


Quote:


> > Hi Swede,

> > Yes, I remember those triangle aprons very well.  I used to play at a
large
> > room in Pittsburgh, PA in the late 50's/early 60's where they were used
on
> > every table.  The aprons were cut from pool cloth, and they did protect
the
> > foot of the table where the balls were dropped into the rack before
being
> > scooted up to the footspot.  Of course most rooms were charging by the
game
> > then, so they needed a rack boy to collect the coins after each game,
and to
> > rack the bals for the ensuing game.  I played at one room where 8-ball
and
> > 9-ball were a dime; rotation was 15 cents; and if you played straight
pool
> > it was 60 cents per hour.

> > When rooms started charging by the hour exclusively, the use of rack
boys
> > gradually faded out.  Without rack boys, players found the triangle
aprons
> > cumbersome, so their use also faded out.

> > I miss those old rooms.  Spittoons were still in use for the tobacco
> > chewers.  There were no TVs, juke boxes were rare, and there were no
women.
> > There was just pool and billiards.  There was always some guy on the pay
> > phone in the corner talking to his bookie, and there were usually guys
> > sitting around sweating games and talking pool.  Now the music is so
loud in
> > most joints that you couldn't carry on a conversation if you wanted to;
and
> > cell phones have replaced pay phones.

> > Thanks for the memory!

> > Doc



> >> Hi fellow old-timers!

> >> I was just thinking back  to my younger years in pool halls and it came
to
> >> me that one hall in particular some 40 plus years ago had a flap
attached
> > to
> >> one side of their racks. The flap was made of thin leather(or maybe
> > vinyl).
> >> It was as large as the rack and the rack boy would have the flap under
the
> >> rack and place the balls in the rack with the flap under them. He would
> > then
> >> pull the rack back toward himself, slightly lift the back edge of the
rack
> >> up off the table, and then push forwrd and the flap would roll out from
> >> underneath the balls and the rack then positioned on the spot for the
> > break.

> >> Has anyone else seen this before? I'm not sure why they did that. Maybe
to
> >> protect the cloth in that area or to dislodge any grit  or dust or
chaulk
> >> from the balls before the break.

> >> Any ideas?

> >> Swede

> You're welcome Doc...

> I was*** around the same ol' place with the SAME old tables...three
> owners later. A dime a rack is what I remember also for 8 ball. You'd call
> out "rackem" and the rack 'boy' what come running back and rack. Sometimes
> the fulltime bartender would have to come back to rack...they always came
> arunning back though right away.  The same old tables are still there with
> probably the same balls!!!  They're in very bad shape after these many
years
> of use since the early 60s.

> No TVs, or video games..a few pinball machines tho. The juke box was not
as
> loud as today.

> Things weren't quite as strict back then, because the law didn't mind
having
> minors in the place for playing pool and drinking soda pop.

> Yes-Great memories Doc!!

Hey, I WAS a rack boy. I was eight years old when I started. It was the
first job for pay I ever had, and my grandfather owned the pool hall in
Roodhouse, Illinois. When I started, in 1952,  It was ten cents a rack, and
I got a penny. Nearly every player played Rotation then. Pill-pool would be
popular for awhile, then would die out again. An occasional 14.1 game was
played, and a few times a year there would be a couple of guys playing one
pocket. I had a little pocket apron to make change from. I loved it when
players asked for 14.1 racks, and hated the one-hole action. Need I say why?
The straight pool racks went fast, and I could earn more money. One pocket
games were even slower than rotation racks. The one-pocket hustlers were
surely aware that they were hustling the pool hall as well as their fish
because the slow nature of the game made for more pool for their money. By
the time I quit, (in 1958--I could make more money with two paper routes and
mowing lawns on weekends) runaway inflation had raised the price to 25c/rack
with three cents going to the rack boy. By 1960, grandpa bought a time
stamper machine and switched to per-hour rates. I remember making pretty
good money for a kid, but I had to do a lot more work than just racking
balls. I brushed the tables, re-racked cues, swept the floor, emptied and
cleaned spittoons (yuck), washed the front windows, cleaned the bathroom,
and ran "gopher" for the customers. (They'd give me fif*** cents to bring
them a Coke and a pack of potato chips. The tip?...Yeah right--not a
chance.)

The room had no juke box. Grandpa was inclined to throw you out of the place
just for whistling; he thought silence appropriate for the intellectual
pursuit of the game of billiards. Speaking of which, I was not permitted to
play pool. Or rather, pool was not forbidden, but I was required to pay the
full rate for it, not even discounting myself my own rack fee! You see,
Gramps was a three-cushion man, and thought pool a silly-ass kids game.
So I could play all the carom I wanted on my own time for free, so
straight-rail and three-cushion were the games I learned. The pool hall sold
no ***, and only snack foods. And tobacco. Cigarettes and enough cigar
trade that the place had a walk-in humidor. In fact, the humidor was where
those of us who had "private" cues stored them. I bought my first cue when I
was thir***. I have no idea of who made it, but I remember it well. It had
a single shaft, a piloted brass joint, plain maple forearm, single butterfly
splice with green/red/yellow veneers, rosewood prongs and butt, white/green
linen wrap, rosewood butt, with a white (Delrin?) cap (no bumper). I don't
remember what ever happened to it--if it was lost, sold, or abandoned.

Yeah, thanks for the memories!

--Rich

 
 
 

Hey old-timers... seen leather flap on racks?

Post by Brian Bade » Sat, 11 Jan 2003 06:54:18

BINGO!!!!!!


Quote:
> > I am visually challenged and can not see this.

> I've never seen one, but it can only be one thing: Imagine an *unattached*
piece
> of cloth/leather/whatever, slightly bigger than the rack, that you place
on the
> table, then put the rack on top of, then place the balls in the rack, then
slide
> the rack forward to the spot, leaving the cloth where it is.  For
convenience,
> leave a little extra cloth to fold up and attach to the back *side* of the
rack
> so their always together.  Since only the back edge is attached, it will
still
> stay behind when the balls are rolled forward with the rack.  Viola.

> Of course, this only protects the surface where the cloth initially sits
> (probably right against the foot rail).  The surface forward of that
remains
> unprotected, and that's where most of the wear is -- especially where the
balls
> are finally racked.

> Pat Johnson
> Chicago